14 in '14 Online Edition
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14 in '14 Online Edition

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Fourteen things today's online news staff should think about and do for 2014 (or before).

Fourteen things today's online news staff should think about and do for 2014 (or before).

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14 in '14 Online Edition 14 in '14 Online Edition Presentation Transcript

  • 14 in ’14 O N L I N E E D I T I O N Improving your online news operation this year Logan Aimone, MJE Permission granted for educational classroom use only. http://slideshare.net/loganaimone http://loganaimone.com Wednesday, November 13, 13
  • Why try? • Work constantly to improve. What you do, and how you do it, should be in flux. • Experiment. There are not a lot of well-tested best practices online. Figure out the best for your community. • Improve and engage. Better content yields an engaged audience. You want both. • That’s success all around! 14 in ’14: Online Edition Wednesday, November 13, 13
  • Try some new endeavors to improve your online news operation. Here are 14 things you can try. You don’t have to try them all at once, but you can get started right away. 14 in ’14: Online Edition Wednesday, November 13, 13
  • 1. Stop thinking in issues. • Think online first. • The website is live. Update it frequently. • Don’t just dump your print content online. Post when stories are ready. 14 in ’14: Online Edition Wednesday, November 13, 13
  • 2. Don’t assume people are coming to you. • Attract them through social media promotions and referrals, commenting and contextual linking. • Share more. Make it easy. • Referrals matter. 14 in ’14: Online Edition Wednesday, November 13, 13
  • 3. Cover the things your audience likes. • Include coverage of recreational and leisure pursuits: horseback riding, boating, hiking, etc. • Video games are hugely popular but get little coverage. • Don’t be locked into a template of sections just because other news sites do. Suggestions: Health, finance, consumer news. • When you commit to a category, you’ll create content for it. 14 in ’14: Online Edition Wednesday, November 13, 13
  • 4. Do more lists. • Listicle: A simple, arbitrary grouping Example: “28 duck-face selfies” • Definitive list: All-encompassing inventory Example: “The 63 best moments from Homecoming 2013” • Framework list: Only exists to structure a narrative; number is arbitrary — whatever it takes to organize/tell the story Example: “36 reasons you should volunteer for the Red Cross” • More info here, here and here. 14 in ’14: Online Edition Wednesday, November 13, 13
  • (Fun break) 14 in ’14: Online Edition Wednesday, November 13, 13
  • 5. Let print and Web work together. • Don't assume the audience is reading both. • If coverage spans both platforms, make sure a reader can catch up through a printed summary or a digital sidebar. • Use website for updates between printed editions. • It’s not just about a story page. Social media posts contribute to communicating to the audience. Consider using Storify. 14 in ’14: Online Edition Wednesday, November 13, 13
  • 6. Provide context. • Tag or categorize related stories. • Use contextual linking, which aids the reader who might be coming late to a story. • Use short links, which are based on the database, not the initial URL. • Nerd alert: Kill the “http://domain.com” for internal links. • Use mug shots and pull quotes. A sidebar can also add a list of facts or summarize past coverage. 14 in ’14: Online Edition Wednesday, November 13, 13
  • 7. Develop and publish a comments policy. • You need one. • Facebook or Disqus plugins are an option, but you can't truly moderate as a result. • Instead, require a verifiable email address and spot-check occasionally. • Three insightful comments with names are better than 300 worthless rants from anonymous trolls. Wednesday, November 13, 13 14 in ’14: Online Edition
  • 8. Show your background. • Put your policies, awards, practices and interesting trivia in the “About” section where people can find them. • On the header, provide the name of school and physical address. • Make it easy for visitors to contact you. Even a generic “contact” email is helpful. If you use a form, make sure it sends a confirmation after the form is submitted. 14 in ’14: Online Edition Wednesday, November 13, 13
  • 9. Engage readers. • Allow and encourage comments. • Develop a conversation with your audience via comments as well as social media. Interact. • Ask followers for story ideas, tips, sources, submissions and feedback on how you are doing. It’s a two-way conversation. • Nerd alert: Use Akismet (free for nonprofits; flags spam). You’ll be glad you did. 14 in ’14: Online Edition Wednesday, November 13, 13
  • 10. Explore a new social platform. • Instagram, Tumblr, Reddit. • Each has a distinct audience. • Discover the journalistic use for things your peers are already using. • Anticipate what's next: Kik? Snapchat? Something else? 14 in ’14: Online Edition Wednesday, November 13, 13
  • 11. Use your analytics. • See what people are searching for, how they got to the site, what they are spending time with. • Use them as a classroom motivator. Can you get more visitors? Can you increase referrals from certain platforms? 14 in ’14: Online Edition Wednesday, November 13, 13
  • 12. Think about your audience. • Is the site responsive for mobile and tablet readers? • Focus on the content, and make it great. • Have a well-designed UI. • It’s about the UX, stupid. 14 in ’14: Online Edition Wednesday, November 13, 13
  • Watch this, and think. 14 in ’14: Online Edition Wednesday, November 13, 13
  • 13. Use the home page as a dashboard and menu. • Kill the Twitter feed from your home page. The reader is already at the website. Keep Twitter feeds that aren't referrals (sports scores, other interesting links). • Nobody cares about your PDFs. • Showcase the most important stories in the carousel, not just the most recent. Help the reader see what matters. • Reconfigure based on the news of the day. Wednesday, November 13, 13 14 in ’14: Online Edition
  • 14. The story page is your landing page. • Less hub-and-spoke navigation to/from home page. • More inter-category clicking. • Make it easy for the reader to find information and understand the story with context and navigation. 14 in ’14: Online Edition Wednesday, November 13, 13
  • Remember… • Your role on campus is to inform your audience, not just to write stories or take photos. • You have a responsibility — an obligation, even — to take that seriously and to do it well. • Your audience needs you to tell the story in a truthful, authentic way. • Doing a good job means thinking about what the reader needs and using tools to meet those needs, not just providing digital versions of printed newspapers. 14 in ’14: Online Edition Wednesday, November 13, 13
  • Thanks! Questions? logan@snosites.com @loganaimone http://loganaimone.com slideshare.net/loganaimone 14 in ’14: Online Edition Wednesday, November 13, 13