2007 09 10 Fzi Training Groovy Grails V Ws
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2007 09 10 Fzi Training Groovy Grails V Ws

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2-3 hour introduction to GROOVY and GRAILS given on Sep 10, 2007 for an internal tech talk at the FZI, Germany

2-3 hour introduction to GROOVY and GRAILS given on Sep 10, 2007 for an internal tech talk at the FZI, Germany

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2007 09 10 Fzi Training Groovy Grails V Ws Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Groovy & Grails Lightning Talk Raphael Volz Sep. 10, 2007 FZI, Karlsruhe
      • Builds on content from the following presentations
      • Rod Cope and James Strachan The Groovy Programming Language Presentation held at JavaOne 2004
      • Graeme Rocher Rapid Web Application Development with Grails Presentation held at JavaOne 2006
  • 2. Agenda
    • Why should I care ?
    • Get Groovy
    • Find Grails
  • 3. Why should I care ? 40-60% User Interface 40-60% Functionality Software Development Effort Variance Max. 20 % User Interface Min. 80% Functionality Focus : Users  Great Interface  Developer  Gigantic Functionality Typically Research … try to be efficient in programming efforts … ... try to be efficient in UI efforts...
  • 4. Efficiency Problems in Web Development
    • Many repetitive tasks
      • Consider example data flow: Database – Object Representation – Presentation HTML
    • Different structure of individual applications
      • Hard to understand
      • Hard to maintain
    • Difficulty to get started
      • Many concepts at once: HTML, XML, SQL, JavaScript, Programming Languages …
    • Need:
    • Simplification
    • Standardization
    • Capture “Best Practices”
  • 5. Java’s biggest strengths in Web development ?
    • VM and Binary Compatibility
      • We can build deployment units (class, jar, jnlp, war, ear, rar, car) and run them anywhere
      • We can easily reuse libraries, APIs and tools
        • e.g. high quality BPM, SemWeb, Market APIs
    • Lots of reusable software & components & tools
    • We can innovate at the source code level if we play nice at the binary level
  • 6. Problems with Java in Web Dev’t
    • Verbose
      • Many import statements
      • Try… Catch Nightmare
    • Static
      • Compile Cycle prevents necessary agility
    • Language Concepts
      • (in my opinion) slow to embrace “modern” concepts …
      • … many of which are helpful for Web Development
  • 7. Agenda
    • Why should I care ?
    • Get Groovy
    • Find Grails
  • 8. Get Groovy – An agile dynamic language for Java
    • Integrates with Java
      • Can call Java
      • Can be called by Java
      • Compiles to Java byte code
    • Simplifies syntax of java
    • Adds modern language features from Python, Ruby, Dylan and Smalltalk to Java
    • Supports DSL (domain specific languages) to compact syntax and increase readability
    • Reduces scaffolding code (Web, GUI, database)
    • Simplifies testing (mocks up out-of-the-box)
  • 9. Groovy // Simplifying Java Syntax (1)
    • Automatically imports
    • groovy.lang.*
    • groovy.util.*
    • java.lang.*
    • java.util.*
    • java.net.*
    • java.io.*
    • java.math.BigInteger
    • java.math.BigDecimal
    Declare all imports Imports PUBLIC PRIVATE Default scope OPTIONAL MUST Typing of variables OPTIONAL MUST Brackets with method calls OPTIONAL MUST Semicolon after statement Groovy Java Feature
  • 10. Groovy // New features beyond Java
    • Everything is an object
    • Groovy Beans
      • Automatically generates get/set methods
      • Uses these methods when attributes are read
    • Simple Notation of lists and (hash) maps
    • Closures - Objects with executable code
    • Operator overloading
    • Extended Switch
  • 11. Groovy // Hello World
    • Java
    • public class HelloWorld {
    • public static void main (String[] args) {
    • System.out.println( “Hello World”);
    • }
    • }
    • Groovy
    • println “Hello World”
    • Simplifications applied
      • Public optional
      • Type information optional
      • Every Class knows “println”
      • Script needs no class and main method context
      • Semicolon optional
      • Brackets are optional when calling methods
    Println “Hello World” class HelloWorld { static void main (String[] args) { System.out.println( “Hello World”); } } class HelloWorld { static main (args) { System.out.println( “Hello World”); } } class HelloWorld { static main (args) { println(“Hello World”); } } println(“Hello World”); Println “Hello World”
  • 12. Groovy // Closures : Blocks of code as objects
    • def c = { println "hello" } c()
    • square = { x -> x * x } assert square(2) == 4
    • square = { it * it }
    • 3.times { println "hoch!" }
    • def sum = 0 1.upto(5) { sum += it } assert sum == 15
    • Use to substitute repeated code blocks
    • Closure with parameter
    • Closure with default parameter "it" does not require return
    • Times function
    • upto function
    Remember LISP ? ... pass around as references, store, execute at arbitratry time ... similar to anonymous inner classes, but nicer syntax and more flexible
  • 13. Groovy // Calling Java APIS
    • 10 liner to get "Google Patent Search" results via HTMLUnit
    • 1 import com.gargoylesoftware.htmlunit.WebClient
    • 2 def searchTerm = 'Robot'
    • // Patent Search with Google
    • 3 def client = new WebClient()
    • 4 def page = client.getPage('http://www.google.com/patents')
    • 5 def input = page.forms[0].getInputByName('q')
    • 6 input.valueAttribute = searchTerm
    • 7 page = page.forms[0].submit()
    • 8 def results = page.anchors.grep { it.classAttribute == 'big' }
    • 9 results.each {
    • 10 println it.hrefAttribute.padRight(30) + ' : ' + it.asText() }
    Closure
  • 14. Groovy // Everything is an object
    • def i = 1
    • assert i == new Integer (1)
    • def k = i assert i.is(k) assert !(i.is(new Integer(i)))
    • No primitive datatypes
    • Int, short byte, long real objects
    • == is equals()
    • Checks equality of objects
    • is() checks identity of objects
    Very, very useful when writing test code !!!
  • 15. Groovy // Groovy Beans vs. Java Beans
    • Java
    • public class Person {
    • private String firstName;
    • private String nickName;
    • public String getFirstName() {
    • return firstName;
    • }
    • public String setFirstName( String n) {
    • this.name = n;
    • }
    • ...
    • }
    • Person p = new Person();
    • p.setFirstName("Raphael");
    • System.out.println(p.getName());
    • Groovy
    • class Person {
    • String firstName;
    • String nickName
    • String getNickName() {
    • if (!nickName) return firstName else return nickname
    • }
    • }
    • def p = new Person(firstName: 'Raphael' )
    • assert p.nickName == 'Raphael'
  • 16. Groovy // Simplified List Handling
    • def list = [1,2,3] assert list[0] == 1 assert list[-1] == 3 assert list[1..2] == [2,3]
    • assert list + [4,5] == [1,2,3,4,5] assert list << 9 == [1,2,3,9]
    • assert [1,2,3] - [2] == [1,3] assert [1,2] * 2 == [1,2,1,2]
    • def sum = 0 for (i in list) sum+= i asset sum == 6
    • Simplified addressing of list elements avoids calls to len()
    • Simplied modification of lists
    • Simplified iteration
  • 17. Groovy // List Handling Example
    • public class Filter {
    • public static void main( String[] args ) {
    • List list = new java.util.ArrayList();
    • list.add( &quot;Rod&quot; ); list.add( &quot;James&quot; ); list.add( &quot;Chris&quot; );
    • Filter filter = new Filter();
    • List shorts = filter.filterLongerThan( list, 4 )
    • for ( String item : shorts ) { System.out.println( item ); }
    • }
    • public List filterLongerThan( List list, int length ) {
    • List result = new ArrayList();
    • for ( String item : list ) {
    • if ( item.length() <= length ) { result.add( item ); }
    • }
    • return result;
    • }
    • }
    Select all names with at most 3 characters from a list Groovy Java list = [&quot;Rod&quot;, &quot;James&quot;, &quot;Chris&quot;] shorts = list.findAll { it.size() <= 4 } shorts.each { println it }
  • 18. Groovy // Ranges and Maps
    • def sum = 0 for (i in 1..10) sum += i assert sum ==55
    • map = ['rod' : 33, 'james' : 35] assert map['rod'] == map.rod
    • map.joe = 28 assert map == ['rod':33, 'james':35, 'joe':28]
    • assert map.subMap(['rod', 'joe']) == ['rod':33, 'joe':28]
  • 19. Basic Sorting
    • list = [ 'dog', 'bird', 'chick' ]
    • println( list.sort() )
    • -> [bird, chick, dog]
    • println( list.sort { it.size() }.reverse() )
    • -> [chick, bird, dog]
  • 20. Sorting JavaBeans
    • class Person { name; age }
    • list = [ new Person( name:'Rod', age:33 ),
    • new Person( name:'James', age:35 ) ]
    • list.sort { | person | person.age }
    • list.sort { [ it.name, it.age ] }
    • list.sort { | a, b | a.name <=> b.name }
    • println( list.sort{it.name}.name )
    • -> [James, Rod]
    • println(list.sort{it.name}.name.join(':'))
    • -> &quot;James:Rod&quot;
  • 21. Groovy // Operator Overloading
    • Maps Operators to Methods
    • Can be implemented by any class and subsequently used
    • Operator Name Method a+b plus a.plus(b) a-b minus a.minus(b) a*b star a.multiply(b) a/b divide a.div(b) a % b modulo a.mod(b) a++ increment a.next() a-- decrement a.previous() a**b power a.power(b)
  • 22. Groovy // Advanced switch
    • switch (v) { case 1: println 'Number one'; break; case 'test': println 'String test'; break; case 2..15 : println 'in range 2 to 15'; break; case [1, '1', 'One'] : println 'Number one'; break; case ~/A.*/: println 'Starts with A'; break; default: println 'Default Output'; break }
  • 23. Groovy // Additional Library
    • Adds methods missing from the JDK
    • String
      • contains(), count(), execute(), padLeft(), center(), padRight(), reverse(), tokenize(), each(), etc.
    • Collection
      • count(), collect(), join(), each(), reverseEach(), find/All(), min(), max(), inject(), sort(), etc.
    • File
      • eachFile(), eachLine(), withPrintWriter(), write(), getText(), etc.
  • 24. Groovy // Strings and Regular Expressions
    • def cal = new GregorianCalendar() println &quot;Date: $cal.time&quot;
    • assert 'only letters' ==~ /((w*) *)*/
    • assert 'only letters' =~ /w*/
    • def matcher = 'only letters' =~ /w*/ mather.each { println it }
    • Usage of variables in strings
    • Matches whole words
    • Matches all words
    • Print all words
  • 25. Groovy // GPath path expressions
    • class Person { name; age }
    • list = [ new Person( name:'Rod', age:33 ),
    • new Person( name:'James', age:35 ) ]
    • println( list.find {it.age > 25}.name )
    • -> [Rod]
    • println( list.findAll {it.age > 25}.name )
    • -> [Rod, James]
    • println( list.any{ it.name.size() > 4 } )
    • -> true
  • 26. Groovy // Builders
    • Implemenation of Builder Design Pattern
    • Used to construct other things
    • Groovy provides builders for
      • Groovy objects NodeBuilder
      • XML,HTML groovy.xml.MarkupBuilder
      • Swing SwingBuilder
      • Ant AntBuilder
    • Can add own Builders (very powerful)
      • Who writes one for RDF ?
      • Who writes one for OWL ?
      • Who writes one for BPEL ?
  • 27. Groovy // XML Builder
    • Groovy
    • data = ['Rod': ['Misha':8, 'Bowie':2], 'Eric': ['Poe':4, 'Doc':3] ]
    • xml = new groovy.xml.MarkupBuilder()
    • people = xml.people() {
    • for ( entry in data ) { person( name: entry.key ) { for ( dog in entry.value) { pet( name:dog.key, age:dog.value ) } }
    • }
    • }
    • XML
    • <people>
    • <person name='Rod'>
    • <pet name='Bowie' age='2' />
    • <pet name='Misha' age='8' />
    • </person>
    • <person name='Eric'>
    • <pet name='Poe' age='4' />
    • <pet name='Doc' age='3' />
    • </person>
    • </people>
  • 28. Groovy // XML Parser
    • XML
    • <people>
    • <person name='Rod'>
    • <pet name='Bowie' age='2' />
    • <pet name='Misha' age='8' />
    • </person>
    • <person name='Eric'>
    • <pet name='Poe' age='4' />
    • <pet name='Doc' age='3' />
    • </person>
    • </people>
    • Groovy
    • def persons = new XmlParser(). parseText(text);
    • assert people.person.pet.name == ['Bowie', 'Misha', 'Poe', 'Doc']
  • 29. Groovy // Dynamic Features
    • Meta Object protocol
      • Intercept method calls
      • Control access to properties
      • Control access to classes
    • Expando Object
      • def e = new Expando () e.a = Math.PI e.m = { println 'I am an expando, this is new method m' } e.m()
    • Duck Typing
      • class Fish { def swim() { println 'I am a fish' } } class Dolphin {def swim() { println 'I am a dolphin' } } [new Fish(), new Dolphin()].each { it.swim() }
  • 30. Groovy // Summary
    • Groovy
    • Dynamic, flexible Components
    • Focus Adaptivity, Prototyping
    • Java
    • Static, stable Components
    • Critical for runtime
    • More efficient compiler
    Typically 50% less development effort (*) Note: (*) Comes at higher debugging expense and 20-90% performance
  • 31. Agenda
    • Why should I care ?
    • Get Groovy
    • Find Grails
  • 32. What is GRAILS ?
    • Grails is an MVC Web framework
      • Initially inspired by Ruby on Rails
    • Built upon solid bricks & best of breed components
      • Spring : IoC, DI, Spring MVC, transactional support, experimental Spring WebFlow…
      • Hibernate : ORM, querying mechanism…
      • Groovy : for focusing on everything that matters
      • And: SiteMesh, Quarz, AJAX frameworks…
    • « Convention over configuration »: Focus not on wiring and configuration!
  • 33. GRAILS // Layering on Java Components Source: G. K. Rocher, The Definite Guide to Grails, Apress, 2006, p. 7
  • 34. GRAILS // Step 1
  • 35. Source: G. K. Rocher, The Definite Guide to Grails, Apress, 2006, p. 39
  • 36. GRAILS // Basic application already there after Step 1
  • 37. GRAILS // Step 2 - Define a Model
    • • Now that the skeleton is there, focus on the model
    • • Model backed by GORM
    • • The model is just a set POGO s
    • (Plain Old Groovy Objects)
    • • First class of our domain: the books
    • class Book {
            • String title
            • String author
            • String publisher
    • }
  • 38. GRAILS // GRAILS Contribution
    • • Automatically, Grails add dynamic instance &
    • static
    • methods to all your domain classes:
    • Static methods: Instance methods:
      • • Book.get(1) • Book.save()
      • • Book.find() • book.validate()
      • • Book.findAll() • book.update()
      • • bok.delete()
  • 39. GRAILS // Step 3 Generation of views and controllers • Once the Book class is created, let´s benefint from static scaffolding -> grails generate-all -> grails run-app • A BookController is created, as well as four GSP: ▪ create.gsp ▪ edit.gsp ▪ list.gsp ▪ show.gsp
  • 40. GRAILS // Scaffolding provides basic GUI for CRUD
  • 41. GRAILS // Taking control of GRAILS V iew M odel C ontroller grails generate-controller /grails-app/controllers grails generate-views /grails-app/views grails create-domain-class /grails-app/model J obs S ervices /grails-app/jobs /grails-app/services grails create-app 1 2 Web Test Unit Test 4 5 6 grails generate-all 3
  • 42. GRAILS // VIEW CONTROLLER INTERACTION Source: G. K. Rocher, The Definite Guide to Grails, Apress, 2006
  • 43. GRAILS // Hibernate interaction • Hibernate is the de facto ORM solution • Domain classes are automatically and transparently mapped with Hibernate • 1:1, 1:n & m:n realtionships supported • Various database environments (dev, test, prod) • Default HSQLDB in-memory config • You can even provide your own Hibernate mapping files for legacy schemas • You can also reuse your EJB3 ! V M C S J
  • 44. GRAILS // A more complex domain class Author { String firstName String lastName def hasMany = [books: Book ] String toString() { “ $firstName $lastName” } } class Book { String title Author author Publisher publisher def belongsTo = [ Publisher , Author ] String toString() { title } } class Publisher { String name def hasMany = [ books: Book ] String toString() { name } } Author has many Books Publisher has many Books V M C S J
  • 45. GRAILS // Domain with constraints to keep valid Add an email to Author class Author { String email // … static constraints = { email (email: true) } } Add an ISBN to Book class Book { Stringisbn // … static constraints = { isbn (matches: “ [0-9] {9} [0-9X ]”) } } V M C S J
  • 46. GRAILS // ... and even more constraints • Many constraints available: blank , creditcard, email, inList , length, min, minLength, minSize, matches , max, maxLength, maxSize, notEqual, nullable , range , size, unique , url , validator • And you can create your own closure validator: even( validator: { it % 2 == 0 )} V M C S J
  • 47. GRAILS // Querying your Model
    • Grails provides various querying mechanisms:
    • Dynamic finder methods
    • Query by example
    • Criteria builders
    • Full-blown HQL queries
    V M C S J
  • 48. GRAILS // Query Examples • Book. find By Title (“The Stand”) Book.findByTitle Like (“Harry Pot%”) Book.findByReleaseData Between (start, end) Book.findByTitleLike Or ReleaseData LessThan ( “ %Grails%”, someData) • Find by relationship Book.find All By Author ( Author.get(1) ) • Affect sorting Book.findAllbyAuthor(me, [sort:‘title’,order:’asc’] ) V M C S J
  • 49. GRAILS // Views • Spring MVC under the hood • Support for flash scope between requests • GSP : Groovy alternative to JSP • Dynamic taglib development: no TLD, no configuration, just conventions • Adaptive AJAX tags (Yahoo, Dojo, Prototype) • Customizable layout with SiteMesh • Page fragments through reusable templates • View under grails-app/views V M C S J TIP: Use grails install-templates to install and customize your the templates to be used for generation (templates in ../src/templates)
  • 50. GRAILS // GSP Groovy Server Pages <html> <head> <meta name=“layout“ content=“main“ /> <title>Book List</title> </head> <body> <a href=“ $ {createLinkTo(dir:’’)} ”>Home</a> <g:link action=“create”> New Book</g:link> <g:if test=“ $ { flash.message } ”> ${flash.message} </g:if> <g:each in=“${bookList}”> $ {it.title} </g:each> </body> </html> V M C S J
  • 51. GRAILS // Rich Set of Dynamic Tag Libs • Logical: if, else, elseif • Iterative: while, each, collect, findAll… • Linking: link, createLink, createLinkTo • Ajax: remoteFunction, remoteLink, formRemote, submitToRemote… • Form: form, select, currencySelect, localSelect, datePicker, checkBox… • Rendering: render*, layout*, paginate… • Validation: eachError, hasError, message • UI: rich TextEditor… V M C S J
  • 52. GRAILS // URL Convention • URL mapping convention: controller/action/id http://localhost:8080/library/ book / show / 1 • Scaffolding can be ▪ dynamic (def scaffold = true) ▪ static (code generation) • Controllers pass data to the view through maps • Direct access to parameters • Easy redirect and forward • Can define allowed methods for each action V M C S J
  • 53. GRAILS // Controllers provide actions to execute (call) class Book Controller { def index = { redirect(action:list,params:params) } def list = { [ bookList: Book.list( params )] } def show = { [ book : Book.get( params.id ) ] } def edit = { def book = Book.get( params.id ) if(!book) { flash.message = “Book ${params.id} not found” redirect(action:list) } else return [ book : book ] } } V M C S J
  • 54. GRAILS // Chaining and Flashing Source: G. K. Rocher, The Definite Guide to Grails, Apress, 2006
  • 55. GRAILS // Services • Services are Groovy classes that should contain your business logic • Automatic injection of services in controllers & services simply by declaring a field: class BookController { MySuperService mySuperService } V M C S J
  • 56. Grails // Jobs • You can create recuring events with Quartz under the hood, configured by Spring • Again a convention on the name and directory • Regular intervals, or cron definitions • class My Job {} def cronExpression = “0 0 24 * * ?” def execute() { print “Job run!” } } V M C S J
  • 57. Further Reading
  • 58. Concluding Notes
    • Slides (largely) inspired by the following two presentations
      • Rod Cope and James Strachan The Groovy Programming Language Presentation held at JavaOne 2004
      • Graeme Rocher Rapid Web Application Development with Grails Presentation held at JavaOne 2006
    • Get started with...
      • GRAILS: grails.codehaus.org
      • GROOVY: groovy.codehaus.org