After the Fall

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This PowerPoint serves as an introduction to Russia and Central Europe since the collapse of communism.

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After the Fall

  1. 1. After the Fall: Post-Soviet Literature in Russia and Eastern Europe
  2. 2. The Cycle of Empire: Destruction Thomas Cole, 1836
  3. 3. Historical Overview
  4. 4. Europe in 1914
  5. 5. The Bolshevik Revolution, 1917
  6. 6. Vladimir Lenin
  7. 7. Warsaw, 1945
  8. 8. The Soviet Bloc
  9. 9. Eastern Europe Today
  10. 10. Moscow
  11. 11. Warsaw
  12. 12. Prague
  13. 13. Budapest
  14. 14. Kiev
  15. 15. Sarajevo
  16. 16. Mostar, May 1994
  17. 17. Soviet Leaders, Resistance and Repression
  18. 18. Joseph Stalin
  19. 19. Nikita Khrushchev
  20. 20. Budapest, 1956
  21. 21. Leonid Brezhnev
  22. 22. Prague, 1968
  23. 23. Lech Walesa
  24. 24. Mikhail Gorbachev
  25. 25. The Empire Collapses
  26. 26. East German Border Opened, 1989
  27. 27. Fall of the Berlin Wall, 1989
  28. 28. The Velvet Revolution, 1989
  29. 29. Rally in Moscow, 1991
  30. 30. Boris Yeltsin
  31. 31. Vladimir Putin
  32. 32. The European Union Today
  33. 33. Post-Modernism <ul><li>Is there post-modernism in Eastern Europe? </li></ul><ul><li>If so, how is it different from post-modernism in the West? </li></ul>
  34. 34. Purely Western Concepts <ul><li>Fredric Jameson : post-modernism as a product of late capitalism </li></ul><ul><li>Jean Baudrillard : post-modernism as a product of a media-saturated, computerized, “hyper-real” society </li></ul>
  35. 35. Jean-François Lyotard <ul><li>Post-modernism as a response to the failure of “master narratives” or “meta-narratives” </li></ul><ul><li>Reaction vs. ideology, faith in progress and reason, hegemony, hierarchy </li></ul><ul><li>Reaction vs. modernist utopianism (in the USSR as early as the 1960s) </li></ul>
  36. 36. Michel Foucault <ul><li>Link between discourse and power: language is used to wield power </li></ul>
  37. 37. Jacques Derrida <ul><li>Fundamentals of knowledge are uncertain </li></ul><ul><li>Deconstruction reveals internal contradictions in texts </li></ul><ul><li>All knowledge is relative </li></ul>
  38. 38. Jean Baudrillard <ul><li>Everything is a “simulacrum,” a sign of another sign, and the ultimate meaning is unreachable </li></ul><ul><li>What we call reality is unreal, or “hyper-real” </li></ul><ul><li>Words are signs without meaning </li></ul>
  39. 39. Mikhail Bakhtin <ul><li>Dialogism: no omniscient narrative voice, but numerous conflicting voices, registers, discourses </li></ul><ul><li>No word is free of its past uses; bears traces of all of its past meanings </li></ul>
  40. 40. Literary Post-Modernism <ul><li>Narrative may be disjunctive, contradictory, ambiguous, illogical </li></ul><ul><li>May be absurd, parodic, ironic </li></ul><ul><li>May digress without reason </li></ul><ul><li>May play with language </li></ul><ul><li>May reflect, lament, or embrace loss of meaning </li></ul>
  41. 41. Post-Modernist Literary Devices <ul><li>Fragmentation </li></ul><ul><li>Self-consciousness </li></ul><ul><li>Playfulness </li></ul><ul><li>Multiplicity </li></ul><ul><li>Blurring of genre distinctions </li></ul><ul><li>Blurring of distinctions between high and low art </li></ul>
  42. 42. “ That postmodernism is indefinable is a truism. However, it can be described as a set of critical, strategic and rhetorical practices employing concepts such as difference, repetition, the trace, the simulacrum, and hyperreality to destabilize other concepts such as presence, identity, historical progress, epistemic certainty, and the univocity of meaning.” Aylesworth, Gary, &quot;Postmodernism,&quot; http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/win2005/entries/postmodernism/

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