A Measure of Success
 

A Measure of Success

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This year marks 10 years since Locus Research was formed. This presentation provides some insight our place, who we are, how we work and some of the work we have done.

This year marks 10 years since Locus Research was formed. This presentation provides some insight our place, who we are, how we work and some of the work we have done.

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  • The team at LocusResearch are the kind of people that make it worthwhile staying upright on planet earth for another day, another decade and a lifetime. Their approach to work, their energy and passion, their successes are something we should be sitting up and looking at as illustrating the defining qualities of a New Zealand innovation powerhouse. More than that - they DO STUFF!!!! If you're action and outcomes driven spend the time looking around the company's capabilities - they're in the winning seat.
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  • Aotearoa is made up of either two or three words, \n \n- *Aotea* could be the name of one of the canoes of the great migration, the great magellan cloud near the bright star Canopus in summer, a bird or even food; \n\nOr\n\n- *Ao is a cloud, dawn, daytime, or world*; \n- *Tea white or clear, perhaps bright*, \n- *While roa means long or tall*.\n\n\nPolynesian Voyagers to New Zealand were guided during the day by a long white cloud and at night by a long bright cloud. \n\nOver time this has been condensed and form the:\nAotearoa *'the Land of the long white cloud'*.\n
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  • New Zealand is a remote place. Depending on whose projection you use we are on the bottom right hand corner of nowhere;\n\n- or\n\n- at the bottom centre of nowhere\n
  • It sits deep in the pacific and is not connected to a continent. It has a unique ecology that developed on its own prior to colonisation by first Polynesian and then european settlers.\n\n
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  • New Zealand was an environment where Birds became dominant due to the lack of predators.\n\n- Resulting in a number of unusual birds filling specific niche roles often taken by other animals including our national bird the flightless Kiwi (a bird that you really have to experience first hand to understand how unusual it is).\n\n
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  • This unique flora and fauna were vulnerable, and colonisation by both Polynesian Maori and European Pakeha has led to the destruction of unique habitats and a number of endemic species which cannot be found anywhere else in the world. \n
  • When you consider New Zealand's low population density It illustrates how fragile our ecology is.\n\n
  • - New Zealand as a culture is very young, when compared to other countries. People have only touched our shores for perhaps 700 years. \n\n- Due to its remoteness, people by necessity, had to be independent & resourceful, in New Zealand there is even a name for this called 'Number 8 Wire'. \n\n- It refers to the idea of being able to fix anything with very limited resources. At one point New Zealand defined itself by this attribute.\n\n- With globalization, increased travel, and the explosion in information technology; There has been push back on this idea, as companies are encouraged to take on more refined and sophisticated approach when they are creating new products and services. \n\n
  • *They perhaps miss the point* \n\n- It is about resourcefulness, and doing more with less, and importantly having the space and room to think differently, Something which is a very valuable commodity especially in design.\n\n- Some of the the finest new zealanders have achieved great things by thinking differently in part, because of our isolation. \n\n- I have chosen a few examples of people that to me, exemplify this ideal, those that are unafraid to try new things and bought a unique perspective to what they did.\n\n
  • - Regarded as one of the most influential running coaches of all time. Lydiard pioneered the idea of base/platform training for all of his athletes (he used to get them to run a lot of miles) and then used periodisation to peak them for major events.\n\n- He led New Zealand to many gold medals at the Olympics.\n\n
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  • One of New Zealand's great artists, spanned many of the key artistic movements of the 20th Century. Found his soul with kinetic art and film. He was always ahead of his time and never stood still for his entire life. \n\n
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  • - Many of his works have only found life after his death with a highly successful and innovative engineering company in taranaki (Mathews).\n
  • - Peter Blake learnt from the best (robin scott johnstone) sailing round the world and bought it back to New Zealand and created a sailing dynasty. \n\n\n
  • - Built on exceptional innovation, leadership, they won the whitbread round the world race (now the volvo), then the America's cup several times. \n\n\n
  • - Not content he then moved on to advocacy and support for the oceanic environment he loved so much.\n\n
  • - The quintessential new zealander, tough, uncompromising, unconventional, self effacing. \n\n- The first to summit Everest, along with many other adventurous feats in different regions of the world. \n
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  • - Not comfortable just taking the laurels Hillary spent his life raising funds for the Nepalese, building schools and hospitals.\n\n
  • - Bill Hamilton was farmer, and essentially a self-taught engineer he went on to develop the modern jet boat and found the worlds leading water jet manufacturing company - CWK Hamilton.\n
  • - The problem with South Island rivers is they are often fast flowing but very shallow. His response was to create the modern marine jet engine.\n\n
  • - It was Mark's vision that built the Formway design team and culture over decades that developed a line of the most successful office chairs in the US and licensed it to Knoll generating hundreds of millions of dollars of revenue. \n\n
  • - Mark gave me my first job and treated me the same way when I was 22 as today. \n\n- His humility evident recently talking with young high school students just starting to think about design at the young innovator awards.\n\n
  • - My mentor, an artist, a teacher, and a wonderful human being. \n\n- As a young women she forged a career in arts and education helping to build new Zealand's first art curriculum from scratch, at the same time completing major ceramics works as a successful artist. \n\n- She taught me it is about more than just your work it is about what you do for others.\n\n
  • - Celebrates its diversity;\n- Cherishes it's independence and freedom with compassion;\n- From issues as wide ranging as the right for women to vote to our Anti-Nuclear stance. \n\n- New Zealand has defined itself by thinking differently about the world we live in.\n\n
  • # Like these people we have\n\n- Developed a way of doing things which was different, reflecting our experience and incorporating at each step our learning.\n
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  • - Our goal is to create world class products and deliver them to market. \n\n- It is the deliver them to market bit that takes all the a lot of the effort.\n\n- We are a design company, but design is the mechanism. \n- Design is how we work and the way we work\n- But sometimes what we work on, can look quite far from design.\n\n
  • Our workstreams are divided into three areas which have evolved over 10 years.\n\n1. *Product Development* - actually developing products and delivering them to market. This is generally us researching, creating, and delivering a product to market including involvement in all aspects between.\n\n2. *Innovation Consulting* - helping companies through advice, review and auditing with their product development. \n- As we have developed we have had requests from companies about phone we might be able to help with improving their product development, or with providing guidance or assistance with innovation within there business.\n\n3. *Open Acts* - Advocacy, education and not for profit programs we believe in and believe we can help.e have worked continuously on advocacy and education since our inception. It has provided us with unique benefits and surprising outcomes.\n\n
  • - This was set at the beginning in 2002 and has provided a compass for us in what we do, a purpose.\n\n- To be independent to be creative to always learn. To work with conscience. To create friendship. To rigorously defend and espouse environmental values in design. Be original to the point of eccentricity.\n\n- This set the tone for the work we have done.\n\n
  • - There should be no surprise that research important to us, research is a part of our name. \n\n- It means the systematic investigation into and study of materials and sources in order to establish facts and reach new conclusions.\n\n- Research is the most important risk management tool in undertaking product innovation, it helps to build understanding which in turn creates the insights necessary to deliver breakthrough products.\n\n
  • - So if in my introduction it was not clear New Zealand is not silicone valley. \n\n- We have to work for a wide range of companies and do more with less to create a result. So being a generalist becomes an important skill in its own right. \n\n- The byproduct of this is that it teaches balance and improves the breadth of your perspective. It helps to achieve unity, Something that is important to developing great products.\n\n
  • - This diagram helps to explain the theory behind the integration.\nThe common skills of research, development and management are applied across the four areas we work across product/service, brand/graphic, sustainability/Life Cycle thinking and Business/commercial. \n\n
  • - An important part of our work has been collaborating with science. This has applied in both material technology and environmental science.\n\n- Early on I gravitated toward projects which were more substantive\n\n- Science has offered and continues to offer the potential for doing things in a dramatically different way and some of these collaborations have proven to be some of our most enduring relationships.\n\n- Our belief is that design, business and science working together delivers the best results even for long term science development. \n\n- Design has a contribution to make to the development and application of new science and technology that is evident through our work.\n\n
  • - Most of my career has been spent on trying to bring sustainability into product development (not always successfully).\n\n- A product of my isolation, in the mid to late nineties I did not have anyone in design I could talk to about sustainability when I first started working. I was lucky to work for a company that had a founder that cared that enabled me to get exposure to first to an Ecologist and then to an environmental scientist.\n\n- This opened my eyes to the potential of Life Cycle Thinking, Management, Assessment and tools. We co-opted a lot of approaches through and started to use them in product development.\n\n
  • Defines all the important aspects of the product \n\n1. What is the ‘core function’ of the product (describe it as a service);\n2. Who the users, customers, stakeholders, and influencers;\n3. What the product requirements are;\na. Customer;\nb. User;\nc. Stakeholder;\nd. Technical;\n4. What the product life cycle and interactions are ;\n5. How it is intended to be produced (materials and processes).\n\n
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  • - We have evolved our process of working over a 10 year period to a framework that provides us an effective way of working that considers what it takes to bring a product from research through to market entry.\n\n
  • - It is not a prescriptive process\n- It is a descriptive framework\n\n- It helps to deliver consistent results through a range of different developments. \n\n- Discovery;\n- PDS;\n- Ideation to Embodiment;\n- Commercialization (which occurs throughout the process)\n
  • Product Development Specification (PDS) Corner stone of the development process. We require alot of information prior to starting development to set the compass in the right direction.\n\n## PDS - R&D Process (2 Slides)\n\n- The PDS has become a core part of our workflow. It provides a very strong platform to develop off.\n\n- It is deliberately broad and considers a wide range of factors from the company, to its customers, life cycle, management everything.\n\n- This is all before we have looked at ideation or concept development. At this stage we are looking for a structural direction that is different that will provide us a new alternative.\n\n
  • The development process is more detailed and requires alot of thought before entering it.\n
  • # Commercialization Process\n\n- We have also got a lot more focussed earlier on in the process to try and build a successful profile for a project. We started our branding projects (not just products)\n\n- We are creating project prospectus very early on to communicate the potential of something to investors, partners and distributors.\n\n- Distribution is a critical component to a product being successful and something we increasingly are trying to address head on early in the process.\n\n- This also highlights the other critical step which can be very hard (if not impossible) to estimate up front. THat is the transfer of the technology and the development into a commercial state. This involves training sales people, transferring data and information and specifications to manufacture (always difficult) among other things.\n\n
  • # Integrated Workflow\n\n- Within the last 12 months we have probably reached a fairly stable state with how we work (although always evolving).\n\n- This combines our workflow into one structure which combines time and task recording, project management, electronic document management, and invoicing and reporting.\n\n- This means we can be consistent across all areas and communicate in a constant way.\n\n
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  • - Development of a sleep system for a bedding company\n- The key research insight was the pressure profile, and the difference between male and female (although obvious) was not\nbeing accounted for.\n- So we sought to create a system which enabled people to be specified onto the right surface without necessarily having to lie on it.\n\n
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  • - Development of an exterior cladding system for a vertically integrated forestry company.\n- The Key research insight was maintenance, looking at other products in the market brick represented 50% + of market share.\n- So we sought to develop a factory finished weatherboard system.\nSounds simple right? required the development of a whole new fixing system that had to be certified. But deliver 2-3x on lifespan with a hugely improved finish.\n\n
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  • - Development of a surfboard travel system for a startup\n- The key insight that drove the development was that surfers were traveling further afield, but the equipment had not kept pace and there were some inherent weaknesses with the existing board bag system\n- The surfboard bag was like a burrito, or a wrap instead of a zipper, it also had a harness for carrying the board bag for long distances and other accessories like soft rack for boards.\n\n
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  • - Development of a non invasive compression therapy system to treat Chronic Venous Disease (CVD) for the largest vertically integrated merino company in australasia.\n- The key insights were that people found the existing products very difficult to apply and it required a clinician. In addition all of the existing products were synthetic which did not aid patient recovery.\n- The system developed was a two layer system that used 'cumulative compression' to create the required level. We developed a novel bi-component textile which created a health micro environment for the skin that would also aid healing and enabled it to be self applied (thereby saving in clinician or nursing time.\n\n
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  • - Development of a wardrobe and storage system for a Distribution company for the DIY domain\n- The key insights were that installation was pretty difficult and complex along with the documentation made it hard for end consumers;\n- The product developed increased the level of flexibility in the system providing not only wardrobes but the ability to configure standard furniture items, It introduced the concept of ventilation within the cabinets to increase airflow to keep clothes fresher for longer.\n\n
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  • - Development of a Hip protection system for elderly at risk of falling for a startup\n- The key insights were that the area which required protection varied significantly over a wide range of people, many products did not appear to attenuate sufficient force to be effective.\n- The product system developed included two different shield designs both able to attenuate significant force under both international emerging standards. \n\n
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  • - As we have developed we have received requests to help companies with innovation and product development. We are however, focussed on outcomes, rather than consulting our goal is still to have a measurable impact through the work we do. \n\n
  • A process to better understand how innovation works within a business.\n\n
  • A series for executive capability development, to train people in product development and innovation. Something we were already doing partially in some projects \n\n
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  • Sustainability, New Materials and Design\n
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  • This year the two creative teams from locus and woods got together to create a campaign which \nReuben will walk you through.\n
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  • I was asked to talk about how we work, and the benefit this has provided us and the lessons we have learnt along the way. It is timely as we have turned 10 this year, and it has prompted us to take a look at what we do and how we do it.\n\n- What have we learnt over the course of ten years, what is important and what are the things which define and differentiate us from others.\n\n- *Integrity* in what you do; \n- *Defined Ethos* to guide your direction;\n- *Going beyond* just your own work;\n- *Integration* helps to create better products;\n- *Operations* is not just for factories.\n\nThanks for listening\n\n
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A Measure of Success A Measure of Success Presentation Transcript

  • A MEASUREOF SUCCESS Celebrating Ten Years of Original Product Development
  • Our Place Ao~tea~roaAotearoa is made up of either two or three words, Aotea and roa or Ao tea and roa.Aotea could be the name of one of the canoes of the great migration, the great magellancloud near the bright star Canopus in summer, a bird or even food;Ao is a cloud, dawn, daytime, or world;Tea white or clear, perhaps bright,while Roa means long or tall.http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/1966/aotearoa/1
  • Our Place Ao~tea~roaAotearoa is made up of either two or three words, Aotea and roa or Ao tea and roa.Aotea could be the name of one of the canoes of the great migration, the great magellancloud near the bright star Canopus in summer, a bird or even food;Ao is a cloud, dawn, daytime, or world;Tea white or clear, perhaps bright,while Roa means long or tall.http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/1966/aotearoa/1
  • New ZealandAotearoa Ao~tea~roaThe land of the long white cloudAotearoa is made up of either two or three words, Aotea and roa or Ao tea and roa.Aotea could be the name of one of the canoes of the great migration, the great magellancloud near the bright star Canopus in summer, a bird or even food;Ao is a cloud, dawn, daytime, or world;Tea white or clear, perhaps bright,while Roa means long or tall.http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/1966/aotearoa/1
  • New ZealandAotearoa Ao~tea~roaThe land of the long white cloudAotearoa is made up of either two or three words, Aotea and roa or Ao tea and roa.Aotea could be the name of one of the canoes of the great migration, the great magellancloud near the bright star Canopus in summer, a bird or even food;Ao is a cloud, dawn, daytime, or world;Tea white or clear, perhaps bright,while Roa means long or tall.http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/1966/aotearoa/1
  • RemoteNew Zealand is a remote place Aotearoa New Zealand
  • DeepSurrounded by Ocean
  • DeepSurrounded by Ocean
  • On its ownNot connected to a continent
  • On its ownNot connected to a continent
  • UniqueThis has created a unique environment
  • UniqueThis has created a unique environment
  • kereruBirds became dominant due to a lack of predation
  • kereruBirds became dominant due to a lack of predation
  • kakapoLike the Kakapo, a nocturnal flightless parrot.
  • kakapoLike the Kakapo, a nocturnal flightless parrot.
  • KeaA highly intelligent alpine parrot
  • KeaA highly intelligent alpine parrot
  • KiwiAnd our national symbol, the nocturnal flightless kiwi, the smallest ratite in the world.
  • Fragility Even with New Zealands lowpopulation density we can still damage the environment
  • Fragility Even with New Zealands lowpopulation density we can still damage the environment
  • Fragility Water quality has become a realproblem in New Zealand with the primary sector.
  • Fragility Water quality has become a realproblem in New Zealand with the primary sector.
  • No.8 Wire No.8 WireIt is about being resourceful, doing more with less, and thinking differently
  • No.8 Wire No.8 WireIt is about being resourceful, doing more with less, and thinking differently
  • CultureYour culture is an expression of who you are, your are influenced by where you come from. It Educates youridealogy.Isolation finds its place;Independance is a developed trait that was required;Resourcefulness was a requirement.
  • CultureYour culture is an expression of who you are, your are influenced by where you come from. It Educates youridealogy.Isolation finds its place;Independance is a developed trait that was required;Resourcefulness was a requirement.
  • Arthur LydiardOne of the most influential Athleticscoaches of all time.
  • Len LyeOne of our great artists spannedmost of the art movements of the20th century.
  • Len Lye Len Lye First moving colour film
  • Len LyeThe wind wand, one of his kineticsculptures realised after his death.
  • Peter Blake Peter Blake A great sailor, leader and environmentalist.
  • Peter BlakeThe 1995 Americas Cup
  • Peter Blake Followed his love of the Ocean tocreate Blakepeditions, reporting on the health of our Oceans
  • Edmund Hillary Edmund Hillary The quintessential New Zealander, Tough, unconventional, self effacing, uncompromising.
  • Edmund Hillary Building a school in Nepal
  • Bill Hamilton Bill HamiltonSelf taught engineer developed the modern jet boat.
  • Bill HamiltonFlat fast flowing south island rivers.
  • Mark PenningtonMark Pennington Built the Formway Design team over several decades.
  • Mark Pennington Formway developed the Life and Generation Chairs sold in the US.
  • Doreen Blumhardt Doreen Blumhardt Teacher and ceramic artist who helped establish art education in high school.
  • Our placeCelebrates diversity, Independance, and compassion.
  • Our approach to work is both a product of our place and where we are from, and our desire to think differently about what wedo and how we do it.What do we do;Why do we do it;How do we work 34
  • Locus ResearchOur approach to work is both a product of our place and where we are from, and our desire to think differently about what wedo and how we do it.What do we do;Why do we do it;How do we work 34
  • We develop products &take them to market.We research, create, develop, test and deliver products to market.85% of all products to market in 10 years;Research underpins this performance
  • LCT Leadership and Conference Papers/ Industry Collaboration Active Involvement In Education Presentations and Exchanges Design-related Events (educational leadership, (research/science (collaborative/business (industry leadership, design enlightening, guiding, leadership, cutting edge leadership, strategic, commitment/relevance, raising empowering, enabling) research, expertise) cross-domain, awareness, spectacular) knowledge sharing)METHODS OF GROWTH Branches And Leaves Individual Specialties, Leading Projects Integration through diversityOFFERING Main Trunk PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT Systems focused Working with businesses from different sectors and sizes Product Brand Business Sustainability specialists aware savvy expertsFOUNDATIFOUNDATION Roots Company Ethos Root The belief that accountability does not inhibit creativity Applied Research Tranparent and Established Commitment Originality (empathy and Evidential Processes To Sustainability (Creativity, independance, perceptiveness, (authenticity, analytics, (integrity, experience, insight) understanding process, rigour, focus) method) benchmarking)
  • The GeneralistIt is necessary to have a wide range of skills to develop products in New Zealand. Thislack of specialisation is not a substitute for knowledge in particular areas but pushes youto learn more about the whole process.Isolation means you just need to do it;Self Reliance no one else will do it for you.
  • Common Skills we apply through the delivery of all of our work Research Develop ManageProduct & Service Brand & Graphic Life CycleThinking Business/Commercial The areas we actively integrate in our workflow
  • The Environment Raw materials & energySYSTEM UNDER ANALYSIS agement Waste Man Emissions to air, land & water
  • The product systemDefines all the important aspects of the product1. What is the ‘core function’ of the product (describes it as a service);2. Who the users, customers, stakeholders, and influencers;3. What the product requirements are; a. Customer; b. User; c. Stakeholder; d. Technical;4. What the product life cycle and interactions are ;5. How it is intended to be produced (materials and processes).
  • Product Development Processa life cycle perspectiveThe product development process as illustrated throughthe life cycle of a native Kauri treeKauri forests are among the most ancient in the world. The antecedents of thekauri appeared during the Jurassic period (between 190 and 135 million yearsago). Although the kauri is among the most ancient trees in the world, it hasdeveloped a unique niche in the foresresearch idea prototype production to market in marketseed developed seed seedling sapling ricker mature kauriThe seed of the magestic Kauri is dispersed If the seed finds itself in dry but cool As a seedling they will develop The young sapling bristles After 50 years or more the trees will reach the The final size of a Kauri is oftenafter pollination by the wind travelling a conditions and isn’t deposited too oblong shaped green or reddish up a and grows a spiky forest canopy. The tree will slow it’s upward determined by it’s conditions, but candistance of up to 1.5 km before settling deeply or eaten by insects or birdlife it borwn leaves quickly dependnig coat developing at a rate of streak and start to broaden and develop grow upwards ofideally in the cool moist foliage under the will germinate and shed it’s coat after on how much direct sunlight they approximately 10-25cm a year. the iconic crown it is well known for. During 30-40 metres high and several metresManuka tree. The Kauri seeds special 35 days. Kauri seeds have bee known are exposed too. this time it will also start to shed the lower wide. Kauri can survive for thousands ofwing like form helps to carry it far from the to develop on fallen trees or even in the branches in a process called abscission years the oldest in New Zealand beingparent tree allowing it to grow gradually and litter at the base of the parent tree, a very leaving the trunk free of knots to become estimated at betweenbroaden over decades.(Stewart, Kauri, 2008) hardy habitat. what’s known as ‘poles’ or ‘rickers’. 1200-1500 years.
  • our frameworkOur work has evolved from a series of frameworks covering individual disciplines to a unifieddevelopment structure.not a prescriptive process for development;a descriptive framework to deliver consistently.
  • Discovery PDS Technical Development CommercialisationPHASE 01 PHASE 02 PHASE 03 PHASE 04 PHASE 0501 Planning 02 Research 03 Concept 04 Embody & Detail CommercialisePLAN & CLARIFY FOUNDATION RESEARCH DEVELOP CONCEPTS IDEA EMBODY & PRE PRODUCTION SALES & MARKETING Defined Project Scoped Technical Principle Final Design & Research Development Solution & Transfer
  • TASK SEQUENCE Planning Research Communicate PLAN & CLARIFY RESEARCH SPECIFY SCOPE COMMUNICATE Into the industry product context and market Technical Should define the following: Plan Present conditions that drive sales in the product Define technical performance requirements category. This is deliberately broad to establish Goals Cost Discuss and other technical factors such as Standards. connections between the consumer, the product, the market and the distribution and Range sale of the product. Consumer Resource Assess Define the consumer and market trends to The Project understand where the product category is Performance Risk Review moving and identify design opportunities. The Product Programme Payback Conclusions Economic The Company Define the price points and margins along with Product Strategy Decision other economic factors. The Market Market Strategy Environmental Define product sustainability in the context of The Consumer the product category using initial tool sets.DELIVERABLES CLARIFICATION RESEARCH DEFINITION SCOPE COMMUNICATION Defined Project and its Objectives. Define Customer Requirements. Set Design Goals/Objectives. Project plan. Present the Documented PDS for review. Define and outline the Product, Service, or Define Technical Requirements. Define intended product item/range. Risk Assessment and Management. Management review and clarification. System. Define Intended markets, investigate drivers Set Performance Goals. Financial Assessment (ROI, IRR, NPV). Assessment of the project viability. v Detail Company Specific Information. and product positioning. Set Technical Targets. Resource Requirements. Decision to proceed, request further Define the Markets. Investigate competing product price points, Define testing & development programme. Provisional Costing. information or to stop. Identify the primary consumers/users. performance levels and general attributes. Define Product Life Cycle/Product System in Document Resource and/or material and relation to user groups. production factors. Define Product Functional Unit. Investigate Intellectual Property landscape. Define Product implementation strategy. Investigate distribution and Supply Chain Define the proposed market entry strategy. aspects. Establish enviornmental characteristics/targets. Investigate Environmental Aspects and Impacts. Research relevant standards and compliance issues for target markets.
  • TASK SEQUENCE Plan Research & Generate Concept Embody Commercialise PLAN & CLARIFY RESEARCH CREATE DEVELOP CONCEPTS EMBODY & TEST DEFINE & RESOLVE DOCUMENT & PRODUCTIONISE Clarify Research Generate Isolate & Identify Develop Test Specifications Company Technical A wide variety of possible Opportunities with the product The product system & Test system & technology, Develop detailed specifications for manufacture Industry Sector Consumer system solutions system. Identify key streams for technology. Embody ideas through external ‘Method of Product & Service Economic downstream development functionally & structurally Limits’ trial with end consumers Transfer Target Markets Environmental Communicate System & Technology into the supply chain The ideas in a coherent Search & Combine Select & Make Evaluate Define Specify manner to all key Across all streams for dominant Prototype system & Results & establish final Troubleshoot Goals & Vision Vision & Objectives stakeholders themes and ideas. Review technology with effective amendments Areas where specifications and assemblies Reporting Structure & Scope key ideas and where possible function for testing & Key Stakeholders Outline & Deliverables Assess combine critical streams evaluation Resolve Sign Off Funding Mechanism Users & Stakeholders The ideas and stakeholder Final design specifications All pre-production samples against specifications Project Champion Customer Requirements feedback and document Evaluate Refine Documents for final costing Technical Requirements for approval to proceed Each potential solution against And improve system & Materials & Processes established criteria and scope technology for consumer Approve Manufacturing & Suppliers outlined in the PDS document evaluation and testing. Supply Chain & Distribution Final system & technology and Evaluate against criteria specifications to proceed to Sales & Marekting established in the PDS Product offer commercialisation document Commuication Strategy Pricing Structure Std’s,Compliance & Testing Life Cycle Management Risk & Management Scope Plan Estimate Resource ReturnDELIVERABLES PROJECT PDS PROCESS & GENERATE & KEY IDEAS DEFINED IDEAS REALISED & TESTED PRODUCTION CLARIFICATION DOCUMENT COMMUNICATE Prepare PDS propsal Project Development Capture all ideas Concept Development Embodiment Design Full system testing. Pre-Production Trials. to scope first stage Specification. generated. Exploration. Specification. Full validated costing & All technical specifications released to supply of project research to Project Plans & Outlines. Document full range of Document the critical solution Functional prototypes. Breakdowns. chain. validation. Detailed Cost Projections. ideas covered. streams for consideration. Preliminary Performance Final Approved Design & QC and Approve all masters and approve all final Approve the Project Defined Project Structure. Assess Ideas Objectively. Evaluate and select the key Testing. Specification. Pre-Production for product. Development and Risk Assessment. Communicate to key idea(s) to enter embodiment. Consumer Evaluation & Approve final supply chain. Validation phase. Review project & approve, stakeholders. Testing. amend or reject proposed outline.
  • Discovery PDS Concept Embodiment/Detail Commercialisation PDS RESEARCH TECHNICAL DEVELOPMENT COMMERCIALISATION R&D Strategy Research & Development Product Evaluation Opportunity & Business Case Develop Core Products Product Assessed by Distributors Secure Early Tech Distributor Transfer Foundation Research Approach prospective Certification Commercialisation Product Trial Initial Research Investigation distributors & present Product Certification & Accreditation Entry Phase Product Trial carried out by Distributor vision for early buy in License Agreements HoA & Supply Agreements Tech Transfer Transfer of Assets to Distributor Pitch Presentation Principal Design Market Release Create Sales Presentation Product Range & Technology Product Launch
  • The 17 categories as outlined on the left illustrate the filing structure consistently applied across filing and accounting systems 17 1 and software for all Locus Research projects and development. The key six areas that these are applied to are highlighted below and demonstrate how each is applied to it’s relevant field. 16 2 This consistent use of categories increases our efficiency and provides an easy-to-follow- workflow and development process for both Locus Research staff and their clients. rifying & Life C Sustain Thinking ion Tra g & Cla 15 3 tat ycle inin Design Process Filing Structure en ability um g& Plannin Sa pt c Ed Do les e 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 nc u & Co h& ca M Our design process employs the first six categories of the Each number of the 17 values above represents a category ar & tio ke arc n14 tio 4 n ting a development process used consistently throughout we apply to our filing system as outlined in the diagram. se Ide everything we do. This continuity ensures out designs fully This filing structure is also applied within Basecamp for Re Busi tail ness Deve t & De conceptualise a wide range of options resulting in highly easy file and information sharing with clients. lopm odi men resolved and functional outcomes. ent Emb lient Liaison Manufacturin13 Meetings & C m ing Tes ting & Supply Cha g in 5 Commercialisation 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Timekeeping 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 g ram &C ign ro om &P g We employ the second half of the process structure to our Through the use of internal timekeeping journals and the s plia in De g din nce kag Co commercialisation phase. The production of sales collateral online Harvest time management resource we plan and ion Pro & Man 12 6 and development of assets are created and filed under this record time spent on different aspects of a project divided Pac ct ra gra system for consistent application across the board. into the filing structure categories. te IP ral & In mm geme & Brand Content l& Le ta e D nt llate a ga gi Di l irec t Co 11 7 Management Invoicing tion Prin 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 10 9 8 The management of any given project is featured in a number of key steps from the full development process. Once time has been recorded against a project using the Harvest timekeeping system. These categories are also All relevant information in filed within these categories from evident in our invoicing as clients can connect what our internal filing system through to our invoicing and elements of a project have been worked on through these timekeeping software and documentation. references outlined in the invoices sent out.
  • Our workThese are examples of some of our work illustrating how we put these ideas and approaches into practice.Research underpins each development;Insight is generated from our understanding;Delivery of a complete product solution.
  • CircadianDevelopment of a fundamentallynew sleep system
  • CortexDevelopment of a Pre-FinishedWeatherboard Cladding System
  • Prototyping
  • CurveDevelopment of a SurfboardTravel System
  • Prototyping image
  • EncircleDevelopment of a Non-InvasiveCompression Therapy
  • GetSortedDevelopment of a Wardrobe andHome Storage System
  • Hip FitDevelopment of a Fall Protectionand Prevention System.
  • Innovation ConsultingSince we first started we have worked on programs for advocacy, not for profit tackling issues webelieved in or have a passion for.Six Lenses for InnovationUnderstand innovation within your businessThe Art of Product DevelopmentLearning about the whole development process
  • Cross company review Isolate the issues Seek solutions Six Lenses for Innovation is a process developed by Locus Research to help companies review andassess the performance of their product development and commercialization process or program.
  • Identifying Winning ProductsSuccessful product Development Creating Market Value The Art of Product Development is a three part capability development workshop series designed to help companies become better at developing new products and delivering them to market.
  • Open ActsSince we first started we have worked on programs for advocacy, not for profit tackling issues we believed inor have a passion for.Metaform sustainable materials & design;Design room craft and design to an audience;Life cycle thinking workshop series;SPD guide for the designers institute;YIA young innovator awards;
  • MetaformSustainability, Material Technologyand Design.
  • Design RoomLeveraging New Zealand Design,Craft and Creativity
  • Life CycleThinking SeriesEncouraging the uptake of LifeCycle Thinking, Management, Toolsand Approaches.
  • SustainableDesignProviding guidance, inspiration andmotivation to improve theunderstanding of sustainabledesign
  • Young Innovator Awards Inspiring high school students
  • Young Innovator Awards Inspiring high school students
  • 10 Years distilledWhat have we learnt over the course of ten years, what is important and what are the things which define anddifferentiate us from others.Integrity in what you do;Defined Ethos to guide your direction;Going beyond just your own work;Integration helps to create better products;Operations is not just for factories;
  • nov jan 2012 2012 Aug Feb Aug July JanMar GetSorted Wardrobe & Storage System Blythe Rees-Jones travelled to the Italian merino 2011The Locus Research developed Curve Surfboard Transition research investigation into sports Scion commissioned Locus to undertake researchLocus turned 10 years old. released nationwide in Australia. supply chain as the Bella Merino Ambassador. Travel System product won silver at the Best and equipment future direction completed. into exterior cladding, resulting in the successful May Rogier Simons joined Locus Awards in the consumer product category. Feb Guardian exterior cladding study. This became 2011 Locus Research presented in the Research as senior designer. 2010 Legacy Hold Taapa product won bronze at Blythe Rees-Jones visited ISPO the template for the first ‘Product DevelopmentDec Sustainable 60 Seminar Series. Jan the Best Awards in the Furniture category. international sports and equipment fair Specification’ (PDS) that Locus produces.Delloch Hip Protector launched into the market. March Coast New Zealand and Locus Research June in Munich to further his research. 2003Oct Locus Research sponsored the first Life Cycle created the Louis Vuitton Pacific Series lounge 2009 Locus Research had three finalists selected interiors with Verda, Pollen and Essenze. for the Best Awards: Telecom5up by 2004 Aug‘Success Grows on Wooly Backs’ article Management Conference in New Zealand. Ryder Meggitt, graduate from Glasgow University featured Prolan new Lanolin lubricant. Young Innovator Awards launched Locus Research opened Studio Sixbee in Kylie Baker (student), Taapa (furniture), Oct Ponsonby, Auckland. Vicky Teinaki joins the and Curve Surf (consumer product). Urbis magazine featured Locus Research and Design Engineering course, joined Locus for aSept in the Bay of Plenty. 2008 9-month internship in sustainable product design. oct Locus Research team as an interaction designer. a design approach with new materials. febBlythe Rees-Jones joined the board of the Feb 2006 July Designers Institute of New Zealand. Vicky Teinaki attended ‘IXD 10’ in Georgia, US. 2008 Aug-Oct Nov Locus Research undertook the development Neil Tierney, graduate from GlasgowAug 2009 Dec Locus Research Transform proposal accepted and project management of the Bombay University Design Engineering course, 2007Blythe Rees-Jones judged the Best Design leader Blythe Rees-Jones was selected by the board of Textiles New Zealand. Sapphire Design Room at Air New Zealand joined Locus for an internship in sustainable Awards: Product section. Dec to be the 2009 Bella Merino Ambassador. product design and completed the Locus Research named Overall Sept Fashion Week with great success.Jun Nov 2006Blythe Rees-Jones awarded a Circadian System Life Cycle Analysis. Exemplar (Small Business) in the SeptDr. Wayne Mapp, Minister for Research Science Fairfax Media/PricewaterhouseCoopers Timothy Allan travelled to Ireland to present at professional membership to DINZ. Blythe Rees-Jones joined Lightweight June and Technology visited Locus Research Studio. Sustainable 60 Challenge. ‘Re-Form 08’ on Life Cycle Thinking. He attended Aug Medical for a reciprocal internship in Metaform03 exhibition premiered at the AucklandMay and visited: Timothy Allan appointed as a judge Glasgow and London for nine months. Museum (June-Sept03) with a follow on Nov 1.Michael Braungart’s Nutec conference; 2005 exhibition at the Dowse (Nov03-Jan04).Locus teamed up with Motovated Design Locus Research appointed to MFE Product for the sustainable product design Aug & Analysis for the first ‘Successful 2.TU Delft (Holland) DFS department; award for the 2006 Best Awards. Mar Stewardship Assessors panel. 3.Milano Polytech, Ezio Manzini; Timothy Allan appointed the external design Product Development Seminar’. Principal Timothy Allan presented ‘Design for a June director of Legacy Timber Ltd to assist in the ID Graduate Jared Mankelow joined Locus. 4.Frog Design, Milan; 2004Apr Sustainable World’ at World Usability Day. 5.Therefore Design, London; Karoline Jonsson, a design engineering development of new product for market. 2002Locus featured on AMP – Growing Oct 6.Onzo, London; intern from Chalmers University, and graphic July Business on TVOne. designer Ailie Rundle joined the Locus team. Oct Encircle Medical Devices reached the semi-finals 7.Lightweight Medical, Glasgow. Locus Research established a formal Jeeves Table selected & exhibited at Interiuer02 inEncircle won a Medical Design Excellence in the New Zealand ‘Focus on Health’ Challenge. 2003May alliance with Tim Grant, associate director Award (MDEA) in the US. Jun-Aug Belgium (Kortrijkt), Design for Europe competition. Locus Research completed the ‘Building Locus Research co-hosted the Life Cycle Timothy Allan gave a lecture on of the RMIT Centre for Sustainable DesignMar Blocks of Sustainable Design’ Sustainable Product Design for Otago and director of Life Cycle Strategies. Aug Thinking Series held at Unitec, Auckland. ID Graduate Blythe Rees Jones joinedEncircle selected as a finalist in the DuPont University and Otago Polytechnic. Locus Research gained a formal alliance with Australasian Innovation Awards. septSept Locus Research and Scion co-sponsored Locus Research started the collaborative project Lightweight Medical Ltd (UK) to undertake mar Locus; Blythe was awarded Best Young Cortex Exterior Cladding System for Pacific Wood the Sustainable Design and Innovation Product Design at Best Awards 2001.Feb Products won silver at the Best Awards in the award for the SBN Awards. Timothy Allan Compass investigating the US market for major collaborative research and commercial work inJono Jones joined the Locus team non-consumer category and was one of only two and Trevor Stuthridge judged finalists. forestry companies Panpac and Tenon. the area of sustainable product development. May-June on a design internship. finalists for the Sustainable Product Design Award. April June Locus established Metaform03 concept and Feb developed the exhibition and competition‘Advances in Therapy’ medical paper published Drybase won bronze at the Best Awards Curve Surf exhibited as a finalist at Report into the European context of Timothy Allan appointed as advisor to the on Encircle Compression Therapy. in the non-consumer category. Sustainable Product Design completed London Sustainable Design Collective. format, including the procurement of major renowned sporting fair ISPO. sponsors Carter Holt Harvey and Prodesign. Aug Locus Research committed to the establishment for the Ministry for the Environment. Simple Vision range launched 2010 at EON Design Centre. Mar Cortex awarded Sustainable Design and Innovation of a Life Cycle Thinking studio course at Unitec 2005Dec category for central and southern areas in the NZI with Hothouse director Dr. Cris de Groot May Timothy Allan established a designEngineer Chris Brown rejoined Locus design National Sustainable Business Network Awards. Nov Circadian Living System selected as one company that will specialise in the area team to work on the Delloch Hip Protector. Jan Simple Vision range released into New of Sustainable Product Design. Locus organised Tom Sutton, GM Locus Research relocated to new premises of only 13 finalists for all categories in theOct Frog Milan, to speak at AUT on the Zealand stores nationwide with a Dupont Australasian Innovation Awards at ‘Studio Mauao’ at the base of Mount great response from consumers.‘Bay Innovators Pile up the Design Awards’ development of medical devices. Maunganui, 100 meters from the beach. in Melbourne from more than 90 entries. article in the Bay of Plenty Times about Vicky Teinaki attended ‘UX Australia’. Oct Timothy Allan flew to Melbourne for the the Locus Research design team. May 2007 Timothy delivered ‘Life Cycle Thinking’ paper awards met Australian Minister for Science‘Making Products Better by Design’ article by Yoh Principal Timothy Allan travelled to Asia to Nov at the sustainable business conference and Dupont Australasia managing director. Kar Lee on Locus Research and how we work. speak on Life Cycle Thinking in Shanghai Transform Project was successfully concluded for the Sustainable Business Network. AprilEncircle & Forester appeared on Campbell and Beijing at Impressions Symposium for with all six finalist companies awarded funding. Sept Simple Vision awarded highly commended Live with Blythe Rees-Jones. Fortune 500 company Avery Dennison. aug Josh Astill joined Locus to undertake research in at Designex04 in Sydney. Oct aprEncircle won silver at the Best Awards Timothy Allan spoke at Phillips Hong Sustainable Product Design at TU Delft in Holland, Timothy Allan completed experimental Life & Forester awarded bronze. Tony Clifford, President of PMA, presented Kong Design Studio on Life Cycle Compass findings to the PMA delegates. co-funded by the Ministry for Environment. Cycle Analysis for UK based BEP (BusinessSept Thinking and visited Dell in Taiwan. Environment Partnership) in collaborationTimothy Allan made a Fellow of the Designers with Lightweight Medical Devices (UK). Institute of New Zealand (DINZ). july may june