Insight to child poverty
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Insight to child poverty

on

  • 801 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
801
Views on SlideShare
801
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Insight to child poverty Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Insight to Child Poverty Lewis Etoria – Project Delivery Manager (Customer Insight)
  • 2. Our tools
  • 3. Benefits of an integrated approach
    • Takes the best of all parts (well tested)
    • Provides a logical and thorough method to review and redesign
    • Evidence based decision making
    • Transparency and accountability
    • It puts the customer at the centre, but NOT at any cost
    • Allows limited resources to be focused to areas where benefits/outcomes are maximised
    • Supports partnership working
  • 4. Insight to Child Poverty
    • OUR APPROACH
    • Established Bridlington Children’s Trust Board – multi agency reporting to the Children’s Trust Board
    • Two workstreams – data and strategic development
    • Mix of tools applied – OBA, Circles of Need, Customer Insight segmentation was used to understand from the customers perspective their issues, experiences and expectations
    • Data analysis identified which characteristics of poverty impact upon different population groups
    • Examined issues/characteristics of poverty challenging the way services were offered and the processes used to provide them
  • 5. Child Poverty Levels in Bridlington
  • 6. Child Poverty
    • Example: Bridlington Central and Old Town Ward’s areas which suffer from Child Poverty
    • Propensity to be:
      • Young working Class families
      • Poorly educated
      • Preference for services to be delivered face to face/ Branch.
      • Unresponsive to Post.
      • These areas have people who have an interest in betting, bingo and going to the pub.
    • Delivered understanding of most effective methods for delivering services and information.
    • High child poverty areas in Bridlington
    • Preferred service delivery methods
  • 7. Challenges
    • Data sharing - DWP
    • Access to good quality household level data relating to child poverty
    • Eligibility/entitlement for services ie free school meals
    • Being clear at the outset of the key drivers/indicators of poverty
    • Resource management across LSP and voluntary sector to deliver the changes
    • Ownership/partnership working – who should lead?
    • Having realistic, measurable and resourced outcomes
    • - ‘is anyone better off?’
  • 8. Lessons learned
    • It is a consistent evidence based approach to evaluating whether services are making a difference and how (& at what cost)
    • Challenged what and how services were delivered to particular population groups (preferred method)
    • Identified where duplication exists and where customer needs are not being met
    • Provided a new approach for commissioning which looked at the whole system and informed its redesign around the customer
  • 9. What next
    • 42 emerging recommendations which have been prioritised into an action plan owned by all agencies, specifically to address:
    • Clearer ownership, strategy and governance for the entire “system” including the establishment of a single shared citizen data analysis team
    • Greater transparency/clarity of roles and outcomes
    • Reduce areas of duplication e.g. signposting/advice key area for redesign,
    • Embed the community & voluntary sector into the “system” to provide role models / mentors / safety net / advocate
    • Evaluate parenting services to maximise impact/outcomes
    • Better targeting of preventative services to shift families away from dependency to increased independence
    • Improve the quality, consistency and empowerment of workers through a review and promotion of the CAF