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Week 5 storyboard norling
Week 5 storyboard norling
Week 5 storyboard norling
Week 5 storyboard norling
Week 5 storyboard norling
Week 5 storyboard norling
Week 5 storyboard norling
Week 5 storyboard norling
Week 5 storyboard norling
Week 5 storyboard norling
Week 5 storyboard norling
Week 5 storyboard norling
Week 5 storyboard norling
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Week 5 storyboard norling

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  • The target audiencefor this lesson is middle school students, grades 6-8. The objective is to introduce students to debate, view an example of a well developed debate, learn how to build an argument, understand the need for evidence and practice choosing strong arguments.Navigation buttons allow students to revisit on their own areas that may not have been clear such as vocabulary.Graphics: By choosing something that incorporates a formal feel to the speaking, students can begin to understand debate is formally arguing a point. Using computer generated figures removes any sense that debate isn’t for everyone!Narration: Recorded sound file plays automatically in slide show mode for students. This is to explain the purpose of the course (objective) and to provide information on what will be learned in the course.
  • Pre-training: Students learn key vocabulary with examples. Students will need to understand these vocabulary words in order to effectively follow along with the lesson. Segmentation: This is a portion of the skills we will practice today and exposes students to only five words. Worked Example: A sample resolution is provided (Social media such as Facebook should be banned) then the information is identified as to how each of these words would be used if that resolution were the focus of a debate.Personalization: Tone is conversational and welcoming; language is informal but informational.Graphics: Simple background color here provides a backdrop for the vocabulary words. With the text as the main eye focus on the screen, students can understand the importance.Narration: Narration is provided in this slide to not only describe the important vocabulary words but also to put in context the words with a sample resolution. This provides students with a better foundation for understanding the use of the words.
  • Worked Example & Segmenting show the vocabulary words introduced and the way they would work in an actual debate.Navigation buttons allow students to revisit on their own areas that may not have been clear such as vocabulary.Graphics: Here students see two men debating. Facial expressions are useful in showing one is arguing and one is thinking. The chalkboard is to represent the classroom and show the resolution. The dialogue & thought bubble are used to explain further the use of the vocabulary words.Narration: Narration is provided in this slide to instruct and provide directions. Students can then click on each number of the slide to have more explanation of the debate in action. This gives a visual to students with audio as to how a debate might function.
  • Segmentation: This is one example of a debate (6:00). Students will see peers making arguments and rebuttals and practicing debate skills in a short and directed debate.Worked example: This is an excellent example of a debate in process. Students view the video considering how the debate flowed, and who they felt was more compelling and why. Personalization: Tone is conversational and welcoming; language is informal but informational.Graphics & text here are simple so the focus can be on getting students ready to watch a sample debate.Narration: Narration is provided in this slide to share information on the slide.
  • http://viewpure.com/K_rYlWd9qbM6:00 minutesSegmentation: This is one example of a debate (6:00). Students will see peers making arguments and rebuttals and practicing debate skills in a short and directed debate.Worked example: This is an excellent example of a debate in process. (modeling example). Students view the video considering how the debate flowed, and who they felt was more compelling and why. Personalization: Tone is conversational and welcoming; language is informal but informational.Simple picture here again showing 2 opposing sides. Text is clear to provide directions only.Video file: Audio in this slide is provided by the middle school students in the video.
  • Segmentation: Arguments are so important to debates that separating this part out along with reasoning/evidence will help students be aware of the importance.Pre-training: Arguments come before evidence so students will recognize that arguments are based upon evidence.Personalization: Talking about the common idea of arguments then moving to what a debate argument is will make the idea clear for students as they learn what it means to argue a point.Text is next to graphic to enhance the idea that while students are indeed arguing, it is a battle of words only. By keeping the text close to the graphic students easily make the connection. In the clipart, the two men are in suits (showing formal interaction) but on opposing sides, just as students would be in debate.Narration: Narration is provided in this slide to describe the use of arguments and to explain that this isn’t the same type of argument they (the students) may be used to having.
  • Segmenting & pre-training. Students are seeing a snapshot of types of evidence (four) with a short description of how each type is created. The next slide provides a worked example along with the idea of argument-building. This is important so students can see that there is more than one way to support an argument and to see that each type of evidence has a place in debates.Simple plain background with text as the text is the focus here. I used contrasting text boxes to highlight important points & words.Narration: Narration is provided in this slide to explain the four types of evidence—instructional as well as informational for students.
  • Worked example: Here the types of evidence are displayed with one specific example for each type. The overall idea is that smoking should be banned in all public places, but then the examples provide a specific look at what would be said for the type of evidence required. Students can begin to understand that there are four types of evidence but that each one can support an argument. These examples clearly show how each type is useful in persuasive debates.Simple plain background with text as the text is the focus here. I used contrasting text boxes to highlight important points & words.Narration: Narration is provided in this slide to explain the importance of evidence and use an example that shares how each type of evidence might look.
  • Worked example: Students see one argument then the development of the rebuttal from another speaker. They can decide which argument they feel is most compelling. This is an excellent example of an initial argument but the rebuttal wins because of the evidence. Graphics: Two opposing views shown. In animation, each speaker’s argument is shown. Here students can again get that feel for opposing sides, formal language and the use of evidence. Dialogue bubbles show the speakers are the ones making the points.Narration: Narration is provided in this slide to explain that 2 speakers are sharing arguments, but the students will decide who wins. This is asking students to choose who they believe is the winner in this argument and why, and provides information about which one has the stronger argument.Practice: Students read both arguments after learning about evidence and choose the winning speaker. Here they choose the winner by clicking on the speaker. If incorrect, it takes them to slide 10 where they have an explanation as to where the speaker is lacking. If correct, they receive feedback on what this speaker did correctly. All navigation buttons link to the original slide so students end up seeing why the 2nd speaker is correct, but they have control and are able to move back and forth as needed. This practice avoids irrelevant visuals, aligns directions with practice question, provides feedback on screen and includes no extraneous sounds (not even audio).
  • Practice: Students read both arguments after learning about evidence and choose the winning speaker. Here they choose the winner by clicking on the speaker. If incorrect, it takes them to slide 10 where they have an explanation as to where the speaker is lacking. If correct, they receive feedback on what this speaker did correctly. All navigation buttons link to the original slide so students end up seeing why the 2nd speaker is correct, but they have control and are able to move back and forth as needed. This practice avoids irrelevant visuals, aligns directions with practice question, provides feedback on screen and includes no extraneous sounds (not even audio).
  • Practice: Students read both arguments after learning about evidence and choose the winning speaker. Here they choose the winner by clicking on the speaker. If incorrect, it takes them to slide 10 where they have an explanation as to where the speaker is lacking. If correct, they receive feedback on what this speaker did correctly. All navigation buttons link to the original slide so students end up seeing why the 2nd speaker is correct, but they have control and are able to move back and forth as needed. This practice avoids irrelevant visuals, aligns directions with practice question, provides feedback on screen and includes no extraneous sounds (not even audio).
  • Worked example: Students practice their argument skills here by choosing the right argument to win the debate. They have four choices but the website will share with them why their choice was not a good one if they chose an argument that was not a wining one. This is a practice exercise but it is guided practice so students will get a feel for how an argument might be built.Graphics: Simple headline & directions here again with a picture of 2 opposing sides to continue to develop the idea of 2 sides to a debate & resolutionNarration: Narration is provided in this slide to explain to students that they will go to a site to practice their argument finding skills.Practice: Students are taken to an external website where they have four choices of topic to see arguments on. This site provides instant feedback when students make choices regarding their argument as to why it is right or wrong in the choice.
  • Worked example: Students practice their argument skills here by choosing the right argument to win the debate. They have four choices but the website will share with them why their choice was not a good one if they chose an argument that was not a wining one. This is a practice exercise but it is guided practice so students will get a feel for how an argument might be built.Graphics: Simple headline & directions here again with a picture of 2 opposing sides to continue to develop the idea of 2 sides to a debate & resolutionNarration: Narration is provided in this slide to explain to students that they will go to a site to practice their argument finding skills.Practice & Collaborative Activity:For this activity, give them a few minutes to consider their position. Then explain they will start with ONE positive argument only, then someone can pose a rebuttal to that argument. This is practicing thinking on their feet and also working on opposing points of view. The key is to address each argument specifically. Once you have had one affirmative and one rebuttal, then allow the negative side to say ONE thing, and the positive to have one rebuttal. Students are informally working in teams and can build off one another in their arguments. Each student would require a microphone to be successful in this activity. This activity is in the heart of the debate—arguments and rebuttals. Students have a chance here to try out their arguing skills while also listening to and supporting their fellow debaters!
  • Transcript

    • 1. Title: Debate Camp Scene (opening page) Slide number: 1 Skill or Concept: Introduction to debate Animation (yes or no): Yes Graphics (yes or no):Yes Audio (yes or no): YesNotes:Introduction or welcomescreen. Using a picture ofcomputer generatedpeople takes away theimpression that there is a 6-8 Debate Campcertain type of person thatdebates—it can be anyoneof any size, gender, race,age, etc.Title shows what the focuswill be; navigation buttonsprovide the ability for thelearner to move betweenslides easily.Narration is used in thepresentation to provideinformation to studentsnot seen in text on theslide. The narration beginsautomatically when putinto slideshow mode. Navigation buttons allow students to move forward or backward at their own pace. Text/Audio Narration: Welcome to debate! In this camp we will explore what it means to debate a point, watch an example of a debate that has been developed by students in middle school, learn how to build your own argument, understand the need for evidence, and practice choosing strong arguments.
    • 2. Title: Vocabulary Scene: Vocabulary (pre-training & segmenting) Slide number: 2 Skill or Concept: Introduction to debate Animation (yes or no): Yes Graphics (yes or no):Yes Audio (yes or no): No Notes: Use size 24 or larger text; the vocabulary Important Vocabulary words are the focus • Debate: A competition in which two opposing here. Use a text box to help highlight vocabulary words with a colorful teams make speeches to support their background to arguments and disagree with those of the other team visually enhance the slide. • Resolution: The opinion about which two teams Narration is used in this slide to explain the vocabulary words and to provide argue foundation for those words. • Affirmative team: Agrees with resolution • Negative/Opposing team: Disagrees with resolution • Rebuttal: Explains why one team disagrees with the other team Navigation buttons allow students to move forward or backward at their own pace.Text/Audio Narration:Debate is a competition. There are two sides to the debate just like in most sports or games. Each team is part of a side of the point that is argued calledthe resolution. The affirmative team agrees with the resolution and the negative or opposing team disagrees with it. Each team provides rebuttals againstarguments. For example, my resolution might be that social media such as Facebook should be banned. The affirmative team argues why this shouldhappen while the negative or opposing team argues why it should not happen. When one team provides a reason or argument, the other team provides arebuttal arguing against their point!
    • 3. Title: Debate Camp Scene: Vocabulary in action Slide number: 3Skill or Concept: Introduction to debate Animation (yes or no): Yes Graphics (yes or no):Yes Audio (yes or no): Yes Rebuttal Debate!Notes:The graphic in thisslide shows a two Resolution: TVspeakers in a debate.Using the facial is a badexpressions and influenceaudio, students canmore clearlyunderstand thevocabulary wordsintroduced in theprevious slide.Narration here isbrief, explaining Opposing Affirmativestudents can click on Team Teameach number to get ashort description ofthe vocabulary wordin action. Thestudents click on Navigation buttons allow students to moveeach number to hear forward or backward at their own pace.the audio.Text/Audio Narration:In this slide we see a sample debate. Click on the numbers in order one through 4 to hear the description of each word in action!
    • 4. Title: MS Debate example & explanation Scene: Explanation of sample debate Slide number: 3 Middle School Skill or Concept: Introduction to debate Animation (yes or no): Yes Graphics (yes or no):Yes Audio (yes or no): No Notes: Simple text here explains the purpose of the video and what students should watch for when viewing the video. Debate • Resolution: All parents be required to have a license before having children. • Format: – Opening Remarks – Point on the PRO side – Rebuttal on the NEGATIVE side – Closing Remarks • Consider which side you are on! Navigation buttons allow students to move forward or backward at their own pace.Text/Audio Narration:Now we are going to view an actual debate held in a middle school. Students argue if parents should be required to have a license before having children.Pay special attention to how each team member forms his or her arguments and then decide which side you felt was most compelling.
    • 5. Title: Sample Debate Scene: Sample debate Slide number: 4 Skill or Concept: Introduction to debate Animation (yes or no): Yes Graphics (yes or no):Yes Audio (yes or no): Yes Notes: The photo shows a “yes” and “no” Click on the picture to view the video side—exactly how a debate appears and provides the link to the video students will view. Navigation buttons allow students to move forward or backward at their own pace.Text/Audio Narration:In this debate, pay attention to the speakers and their arguments. What are their best points? Which side is most compelling?
    • 6. Title: Arguments Scene: Sample debate Slide number: 5 Skill or Concept: Introduction to debate Animation (yes or no): Yes Graphics (yes or no):Yes Audio (yes or no): Yes Notes: The graphic here shows again two men in suits disagreeing Arguments • Arguments are formally rather than in a violent way. The not conflicts or text supports the idea that the arguments are formal rather than informal, quarrels! • Your argument violent clashes. is your position on the issue or your point of view that you will defend. Navigation buttons allow students to move forward or backward at their own pace.Text/Audio Narration:Arguments are what we all think of as fights! In debate, arguments are fights of logic and words only. Your job is to develop a stronger case than youropponent and then effectively argue that point with your team or on your own if not in a team debate.
    • 7. Title: Types of evidence Scene: Four types of evidence Slide number: 6 Skill or Concept: Introduction to debate Animation (yes or no): Yes Graphics (yes or no):Yes Audio (yes or no): Yes Support for an argument consists Notes: Simple text here to show the four types of evidence. This is both instructional of EVIDENCE. and informational. 1. Example: From your own experience or from what you heard or read. 2. Common Sense: Things that you believe everyone knows. 3. Expert Opinions: The opinions of experts—this comes from research. 4. Statistics: Numbers—this also comes from researchText/Audio Narration:Evidence supports arguments. Think of evidence like the parachute for your argument! It holds that argument up! There are four types of evidence wewill examine here—”example”; “common sense”; “expert opinion”; “statistics”. An example is just what you think it is—grabbing something from yourown experience and sharing it in support of your argument. Common sense evidence is something most people should know such as “look both waysbefore you cross the street.” Expert opinions support facts and are found in research along with statistics (numbers).
    • 8. Title: Examples of evidence Scene: Plain background; worked example Slide number: 7 Skill or Concept: Introduction to debate Animation (yes or no): Yes Graphics (yes or no):Yes Audio (yes or no): Yes Notes: This slide is a duplicate of the Smoking should be banned in all public places. previous slide so students can make a 1. Example: Whenever I go into a restaurant and there are correlation between the four types of people smoking near me, I feel I am breathing in their evidence and these four simple smoke. This makes me a smoker even though I don’t want examples. Here they to be. can understand that providing evidence 2. Common Sense: Secondhand smoke is very unhealthy for make sense. This is informational as well nonsmokers. as instructional here! 3. Expert Opinions: Secondhand smoke causes 250,000 respiratory infections in infants & children each year. 4. Statistics: According to the Environmental Protection Agency, “secondhand smoke causes approximately 3,000 lung cancer deaths in nonsmokers each year.”Text/Audio Narration:Now let’s take a look at some examples! The resolution we are looking at is “smoking should be banned in all public places”. We want to argue for thisresolution so let’s see what evidence we can provide! The first type is example. (read the example). Remember this is something from personalexperience. The second type is common sense. Everyone can agree that secondhand smoke is very unhealthy for nonsmokers! (and smokers alike, I’dsay!) Experts say that secondhand smoke causes 250,000 respiratory infections in infants and children each year. This data is from pediatricians examiningthe effects of smoking on kids. Finally the numbers don’t lie—EPA shares that secondhand smoke causes about 3,000 lung cancer deaths in non-smokerseach year. As you can see there is a place for each type of evidence in a debate so consider which piece you believe is most compelling!
    • 9. Title: Sample Which Speaker Wins? Scene: Plain background; worked example Slide number: 8 Skill or Concept: Introduction to debate Animation (yes or no): Yes Graphics (yes or no):Yes Audio (yes or no): Yes Notes: In this worked example students can Which Speaker Wins? see the speaker’s Television is a good Speaker 1 says TV is a points and decide for influence because it helps good influence but I themselves which speaker is more you learn valuable skills. disagree. TV is a bad effective. By using For example, children influence because it speakers behind a learn to read and count causes obesity. For podium, the formal impact of the by watching educational example, the average child language is programs. spends 4 hours every day conveyed. watching TV when they White background could be engaged in puts text at forefront physical activities. of the slide and is the focus. Therefore, TV is more of a bad influence. Children can always learn to read and count from other sources but they can’t get back the time they have wasted in front of the TV.Text/Audio Narration:Here we have an example of two speakers in a debate. Which argument is more compelling to you? Why? Read each argument then click on the speakeryou believe provided the best argument!
    • 10. Title: Sample Which Speaker Wins? Scene: Plain background; worked example Slide number: 8 Skill or Concept: Introduction to debate Animation (yes or no): Yes Graphics (yes or no):Yes Audio (yes or no): No Notes: In this worked example students can Which Speaker Wins? see the speaker’s points and decide for This speaker had a themselves which strong start but provided speaker is more very little evidence. In this effective. By using speakers behind a simple argument, podium, the formal Speaker 1 is not the impact of the victor! language is conveyed.Text/Audio Narration:
    • 11. Title: Sample Which Speaker Wins? Scene: Plain background; worked example Slide number: 8 Skill or Concept: Introduction to debate Animation (yes or no): Yes Graphics (yes or no):Yes Audio (yes or no): No Notes: In this worked example students can Which Speaker Wins? see the speaker’s This speaker provides a points and decide for rebuttal to the information themselves which speaker is more shared by speaker 1. In effective. By using addition, the speaker adds speakers behind a evidence. The speaker podium, the formal impact of the uses statistics as well as language is common sense evidence! conveyed. Speaker 2 is the victor!Text/Audio Narration:
    • 12. Title: Practice choosing arguments Scene: Sample debate Slide number: 12 Skill or Concept: Introduction to debate Animation (yes or no): Yes Graphics (yes or no):Yes Audio (yes or no): Yes Notes: The photo here again shows the need to think of the Your turn to practice! argument and the rebuttal when in a debate. The idea is to keep students understanding that the point is to use formal language and be polite at all times. Click on the picture to visit your practice website!Text/Audio Narration:Now it is your turn to have some fun with arguments. Click on the picture. It will take you to FunEnglishGames.com where you will choose a topic toargue (there are four choices), then read the argument presented by your opponent. Click on “Argue” and you will be presented with four argumentchoices. Make your choice and the game will tell you if you made the right choice or not!, and why!
    • 13. Title: Sparring Debate Practice Scene: Dog reading book; colored background Slide number: 13 Skill or Concept: Introduction to debate Animation (yes or no): Yes Graphics (yes or no):Yes Audio (yes or no): Yes Notes: The background is simple in color; text box primary focus. Simple photo that might spark ideas for students when they are approaching their Sparring Debates! positions in the debate. • Our topic is “Animals think like humans.” • We will have a brief sparring debate, where each speaker can share ONE affirmative position and then there will be one rebuttal.Text/Audio Narration:It is your turn to practice debate skills. For this activity, you will need your microphone. This is called a sparring debate. In this debate, we will argue theresolution “Animals think like humans”. Consider your position on this issue. Do you agree or not? What are some arguments you could make to supportyour opinion? Jot down a few ideas. In just a few moments, we will debate by having one person who supports this resolution make an argument, thenwe will have a rebuttal to that argument. Let’s go!

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