Sales – The Last Mile to the Customer

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  • Six sigma is a measure of process quality. 3.4 errors per million. Sales is measured at one sigma – 69% error rate.
  • The Challenger (27% of the sample) – These reps are the debaters on the team.  They have a deep understanding of the customer’s business, and based on that insight, the Challenger rep is not afraid to assert his/her views…even if those views differ from the customer.

    The Relationship Builder (21% of the sample) – Sales reps that fall into this category have a tremendous service mentality.  They are adept at building and nurturing customer relationships by being highly accessible to the customer and responsive to needs

    The Hard Worker (21% of the sample) – These are the folks that are always willing to go the extra mile.  These sales reps are self-motivated, nose to the grindstone, and don’t give up easily.  They run to feedback and seek out opportunities for improvement.

    The Lone Wolf (18% of the sample) – These reps are self-confident – they follow their own instincts instead of the rules.  We love them because they bring in the number – we hate them because they’re both hard to manage as well as hard to find.  These reps are probably best described as the prima donnas of your sales force.

    The Problem Solver (14% of the sample) – Detail-oriented reps that are reliable and naturally drawn to solving client issues (particularly the kinds of post-sales service issues that can really bog down a client relationship).

    Who Wins? By far, the profile most associated with high performance is the Challenger profile.  Again, these are the reps that love to debate and use his/her deep understanding of a customer’s business to provide that customer with a different way of thinking about their business and how to compete.  In fact, when you dig into the data, they do three things well:
    Teach – Providing insight in the moment and teaching customers something new/valuable about how to compete in their market
    Tailor – Crafting the message being delivered to resonate with the customer’s specific priorities
    Assert Control – This does not mean be aggressive or abusive; this is about the ability and willingness of a sales rep to stand their ground when the customer begins to push back.
  • What kinds of sales people are successful? Who do you want on the team?

    The Challenger (27% of the sample) – These reps are the debaters on the team.  They have a deep understanding of the customer’s business, and based on that insight, the Challenger rep is not afraid to assert his/her views…even if those views differ from the customer.

    The Relationship Builder (21% of the sample) – Sales reps that fall into this category have a tremendous service mentality.  They are adept at building and nurturing customer relationships by being highly accessible to the customer and responsive to needs

    The Hard Worker (21% of the sample) – These are the folks that are always willing to go the extra mile.  These sales reps are self-motivated, nose to the grindstone, and don’t give up easily.  They run to feedback and seek out opportunities for improvement.

    The Lone Wolf (18% of the sample) – These reps are self-confident – they follow their own instincts instead of the rules.  We love them because they bring in the number – we hate them because they’re both hard to manage as well as hard to find.  These reps are probably best described as the prima donnas of your sales force.

    The Problem Solver (14% of the sample) – Detail-oriented reps that are reliable and naturally drawn to solving client issues (particularly the kinds of post-sales service issues that can really bog down a client relationship).

    Who Wins? By far, the profile most associated with high performance is the Challenger profile.  Again, these are the reps that love to debate and use his/her deep understanding of a customer’s business to provide that customer with a different way of thinking about their business and how to compete.  In fact, when you dig into the data, they do three things well:
    Teach – Providing insight in the moment and teaching customers something new/valuable about how to compete in their market
    Tailor – Crafting the message being delivered to resonate with the customer’s specific priorities
    Assert Control – This does not mean be aggressive or abusive; this is about the ability and willingness of a sales rep to stand their ground when the customer begins to push back.
  • Sales – The Last Mile to the Customer

    1. 1. Sales – The Last Mile to the Customer Lee Levitt VP, Strategic Accounts By Appointment Only 11/10/2010
    2. 2. “The purpose of a business is to create a customer”
    3. 3. Where does Differentiation Take Place? 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Price Brand Products Field Source: CEB 2010
    4. 4. Where does Differentiation Take Place? 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Price Brand Products Field Source: CEB 2010
    5. 5. Where does Differentiation Take Place? 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Price Brand Products Field The Trusted Advisor Source: CEB 2010
    6. 6. Voice of the Customer: Sales Rep Preparation 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Not Prepared Somewhat Prepared Prepared Very Prepared Source: IDC 2010
    7. 7. Voice of the Customer: Sales Rep Preparation 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% Not Prepared Somewhat Prepared Prepared Very Prepared Source: IDC 2010
    8. 8. Voice of the Customer: Sales Rep Preparation 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% Not Prepared Somewhat Prepared Prepared Very Prepared Source: IDC 2010
    9. 9. 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% Not Prepared Somewhat Prepared Prepared Very Prepared The Trusted Advisor Voice of the Customer: Sales Rep Preparation Source: IDC 2010
    10. 10. Do you have the right people on your team?
    11. 11. Five Types of Sales People • The Challenger • The Relationship Builder • The Hard Worker • The Lone Wolf • The Problem Solver Source: CEB 2010
    12. 12. Five Types of Sales People • The Challenger • The Relationship Builder • The Hard Worker • The Lone Wolf • The Problem Solver Source: CEB 2010
    13. 13. Do you have a Point of View?
    14. 14. The Point of View Developing your Point of View: • Become an expert in your client’s business – The industry, their peers, their operational challenges • Bring your experiences to the table – Where have you seen these patterns before? • Listen – Each customer is unique…don’t ASSuME! It doesn’t matter if you’re right!
    15. 15. The Point of View Delivering your Point of View • Push your customer out of their comfort zone • Help them see competitive challenges in a new light • Highlight painful situations and make them unmistakably urgent • Create constructive tension and use it to your advantage It’s All About Them!
    16. 16. Roadmap to Success
    17. 17. Roadmap to Success • Build the right team • Provide the sales tools that ensure success • Target the “right” customers and get to know them thoroughly • Continue to learn, improve, grow, push your own personal (and organizational) envelope! • Consistency is critical
    18. 18. Next Steps – Ensuring Success in 2011 and Beyond How will you position your company? • What resources will you bring to the table? • What relationship will you develop with your customers? • What will you do differently? What do you want your customers to say about you?
    19. 19. Lee Levitt VP, Strategic Accounts, BAO llevitt@baoinc.com www.thoughtsonselling.com 781 323-7018 To continue the conversation…

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