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Dignity for All Students Act (DASA)
 

Dignity for All Students Act (DASA)

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The Dignity for All Students Act (DASA) went into effect on July 1, 2012 requiring schools to provide students with a safe and supportive environment free from discrimination, intimidation, taunting, ...

The Dignity for All Students Act (DASA) went into effect on July 1, 2012 requiring schools to provide students with a safe and supportive environment free from discrimination, intimidation, taunting, harassment, and bullying. This presentation will cover what DASA is and how it is being implemented in NYC schools through the Discipline Code and Respect for All initiative. Participants will be provided with ways to find assistance and resources on DASA and bullying.
Luz Minaya

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    Dignity for All Students Act (DASA) Dignity for All Students Act (DASA) Presentation Transcript

    • Dignity for All Students Act(DASA) District Five Anti-Bullying and Safety Conference - Saturday October 27th, 2012 Luz Minaya, United Federation Of TeachersSaturday, October 27, 12
    • IMPORTANT FACTS ✤ The Dignity Act takes effect on July 1, 2012. ✤ The Dignity for All Students Act aims to halt the bias-based harassment and bullying present in public schools throughout New York. The bill passed the State Assembly on May 17, 2010, and the Senate on June 22, 2010. Governor David Paterson signs it into law on September 13. 2010. ✤ The Dignity Act includes, but is not limited to, acts of discrimination and harassment based on a student’s race, color, weight, national origin, ethnic group, religion, religious practice, disability, sexual orientation, gender (defined to include gender identity or expression), or sex. ✤ The Dignity Act makes it the official policy of New York State that all students in public schools have the right to an education free of discrimination and harassment. ✤ The Dignity Act empowers school staff to consider all the forms of harassment of students by other students or staff that occur on school property or at a school function.Saturday, October 27, 12
    • Most important for Schools... ✤ As a result of the Dignity Act, the Board of Regents amended Commissioners Regulation 100.2(c) to include classroom instruction that supports the development of a school environment free of discrimination and harassment, including but not limited to, instruction that raises awareness and sensitivity to discrimination and harassment based on a person’s actual or perceived race, color, weight, national origin, ethnic group, religion, religious practice, disability, sexual orientation, gender, and sex.Saturday, October 27, 12
    • Current State-Level Activities ✤ Dignity Act School Employee Training Program ✤ On or before July 1, 2012, school districts and charter schools shall establish guidelines for its SCHOOL (s) to implement, commencing with the 2012- 2013 school year and continuing in each school year thereafter, Dignity for All Students school employee training programs to promote a positive school environment that is free from discrimination and harassment; and to discourage and respond to incidents of discrimination and/or harassment on school property or at a school function. ✤ Training may be implemented and conducted in conjunction with existing professional development training pursuant to 100.2(dd)(2)(ii) and/or with other training for instructional and non-instructional staff.Saturday, October 27, 12
    • Current State-Level Activities . . . ✤ School Dignity Act Coordinator (DAC) ✤ At least one employee in every school shall be designated as a DAC and thoroughly trained in methods to respond to human relations in the areas of race, color, weight, national origin, ethnic group, religion, religious practices, disability, sexual orientation, gender, or sex. ✤ Annual reporting by school districts, BOCES, and charter schools – starting with incidents in the 2012-13 school year (New Amendment to make this requirement a State Law).Saturday, October 27, 12
    • Implementation In New York City Public Schools ✤ Respect For All - DOE’s Initiative ✤ The Department of Education’s Discipline Code ✤ NYCDOE Chancellor’s Regulations ✤ CR A-832 - STUDENT-TO-STUDENT BIASED-BASED HARASSMENT, INTIMIDATION, AND/OR BULLYING (New changes 10/12/11) ✤ CR A-443 - Student Discipline Procedures (New Changes 03/05/04) ✤ CR A-830 - ANTI-DISCRIMINATION POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR FILING INTERNAL COMPLAINTS OF DISCRIMINATION (New changes 6/26/12)Saturday, October 27, 12
    • Implementation in NYCDOE Cont.. ✤ School Dignity Act Coordinator ✤ Designate a Staff Member to Become an Expert on Bullying: The Dignity Act requires each school to have at least one staff member who acts as a point person on bullying issues and incidents. This person must receive comprehensive training on the causes of bullying, the psychology of bullying, and how to intervene when bullying occurs. Title IX requires every school to designate a staff person to handle complaints of sex discrimination; this same person can be responsible for responding to bullying.Saturday, October 27, 12
    • Implementation in NYCDOE Cont.. ✤ School Climate and Culture ✤ Establishing and sustaining a school environment free of discrimination and harassment involves taking a close look at a school’s climate and culture. ✤ School climate and culture have a profound impact on student achievement, behavior, and reflects the school community’s culture. ✤ Impacting schools climate and culture may include, but are not limited to, one’s perception of their personal safety, interpersonal relationships, teaching, learning, as well as the external environment.Saturday, October 27, 12
    • Assistance Outreach and Voluntary Tools ✤ United Federation of Teachers ✤ The UFTs BRAVE campaign aims to combat bullying in our schools. Short for Building Respect, Acceptance and Voice through Education, the BRAVE campaign provides educators with the tools, knowledge and support to be pro-active in confronting and stopping bullying. ✤ www.uft.org/BRAVE ✤ FACEBOOK PAGE – Updates ✤ BRAVE line: 212-709-3222 ✤ Text:" 646-490-0233 ✤ Counselors available: Mon–Fri., 2:30pm – 9:30pmSaturday, October 27, 12
    • Assistance Outreach and Voluntary Tools ✤ New York State Department DASA link ✤ www.p12.nysed.gov/dignityact/ ✤ email:" DASA@MAIL.NYSED.GOV ✤ Facebook Page- fast updates ✤ New York Center for School Center ✤ www.nyscenterforschoolsafety.org ✤ email:" scss@ulsterboces.org ✤ Facebook Page- fast updatesSaturday, October 27, 12
    • Assistance Outreach and Voluntary Tools ✤ National School Climate Center ✤ www.schoolclimate.org/climate ✤ Facebook Page- fast updates ✤ New York Civil Liberties Union ✤ http://www.nyclu.org ✤ Stopbullying.gov ✤ www.stopbullying.gov/topics/civil_violation ✤ Facebook Page- Fast updatesSaturday, October 27, 12
    • GETTING HELP If you have done everything you can to resolve the situation and nothing has worked, or someone is in immediate danger, there are ways to get help. The problem What you can do There has been a crime or someone is at immediate risk of harm. Call 911. Contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline online or at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). Someone is feeling hopeless, helpless, thinking of suicide. The toll-free call goes to the nearest crisis center in our national network. These centers provide 24- hour crisis counseling and mental health referrals. Someone is acting differently than normal, such as always seeming sad or 1. Find a local counselor or other mental health anxious, struggling to complete tasks, or not being able care for services themselves. 2. UFT’s BRAVE Hotline @ 212- 709-3222Saturday, October 27, 12
    • GETTING HELP The problem What you can do Contact: 1. Parent Coordinator 2. Dignity Act Coordinator (DAC) 3. School Counselor A child is being bullied in school. 4. School Principal 5. DOE’s Respect for ALL: email: respectforall@schools.nyc,gov 6.  School  Superintendent 7.  New  York  State  Department  of   The school is not adequately addressing Education harassment based on race, color, national 8.  US  Department  Od  Education,  Of?ice   origin, sex, disability, or religion. of  Cilvil  Rights 9.  US  Department  of  Justice,  Civil  Rights   DivisionSaturday, October 27, 12
    • Luz Minaya’s Brief Bio Luz Minaya is a New York City native. She began her career in education as a Spanish and Technology Teacher in 2002, for a public middle school in NYC’s Washington Heights. She received her Bachelor’s degree in Spanish from Lehman College and completed a Masters of Science in Instructional Technology from New York Institute of Technology. Luz is a creative, passionate instructor and loves to include performances, videos, music and current technology trends during her classes. She brings to her classes a deep understanding of technologys capabilities and limitations, as well as a creative flair that gives her students the opportunity to explore technology in interesting and interactive ways. In 2011, Luz joined the Be BRAVE campaign of the United Federation of Teachers that combats bullying in our schools. The BRAVE campaign provides educators, parents and students with the tools, knowledge and support to be proactive in confronting and stopping bullying. Luz has spoken at a variety of conferences and seminars on topics related to bullying in schools. Currently, the UFT’s BRAVE campaign is recognized in several anti-bullying books and is an official resource on the federal governments anti-bullying website, stopbullying.gov.Saturday, October 27, 12