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Action research proposal ppt
Action research proposal ppt
Action research proposal ppt
Action research proposal ppt
Action research proposal ppt
Action research proposal ppt
Action research proposal ppt
Action research proposal ppt
Action research proposal ppt
Action research proposal ppt
Action research proposal ppt
Action research proposal ppt
Action research proposal ppt
Action research proposal ppt
Action research proposal ppt
Action research proposal ppt
Action research proposal ppt
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Action research proposal ppt

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Looking for feedback and comments on my action research presentation. Please identify yourself as well as your institution or teaching role. Thank you so much

Looking for feedback and comments on my action research presentation. Please identify yourself as well as your institution or teaching role. Thank you so much

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  • nice action research it really help me in my in coming proposal of an action research. I am teacher in a secondary level in the Philippines.
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  • The purpose of this study aimed to determine factors that contributed to student retention, attrition, and drop-out rates. The study aimed to find causation that connects the reduction in retention to student demographic characteristics, social factors, and learning influences. The study takes an introspective look into completion rates and the changing demographics of American society, and students who arrive at universities unprepared to meet the academic and social challenges of their bachelor program (University of Phoenix, 2009).
  • Description of Community At the time of this action research study, The University of Phoenix was the largest private university in North America. Enrollment at the time was approximately 422,500 students nationwide. The university caters to underserved students who want to participate in higher education, but who are shut out of traditional institutions (University of Phoenix, 2009). According to the National Center for Education Statistics, only 27% of undergrads were considered to be traditional students, those defined as going directly from high school into college, living on campus, and financially dependent on their parents (NCES, 2002).Description of Work Setting This research project took place at a local University of Phoenix campus in Central Florida. The student population consisted of two different undergraduate classes enrolled in campus bachelor degree programs. Each class would be approaching their 3rd or 4th course in their undergraduate degree programs. Some students were bachelor level freshman; others were sophomores, all were new, incoming students to the University of Phoenix. All students were c enrolled as ground/ on- campus programs that met once per week, each course lasted for five weeks. Classes required both individual and learning team assignments and projects throughout the duration of the course. All students either worked full-time or part-time, most had families and busy life styles. Taking one class at a time was a proven learning model developed by the University of Phoenix and offered the optimal solution for obtaining higher education while continuing to work and fulfill family and personal responsibilities.
  • Writer’s Role. At the time of this study the writer’s role at University of Phoenix was that of an employee who worked in a business development capacity for the college of education. The writer was also a graduate student working on action research for a master of education degree. The writer was responsible for implementing a survey to the student population being studied. The writer was also responsible for identifying and documenting the characteristics and student factors that contributed and led to student drop rates at the undergraduate level. Experience and inside knowledge of retention rates within the university system created a desire to further explore retention barriers and a pursuit to find a solution that would have long term impact on improved persistence. 
  • Causative Analysis The factors and influences linked to retention and drop rates are wide and plentiful. The evidence suggests changing demographics have a strong correlation as well as socioeconomic factors and background influences play a key role in the equation. Race, ethnic origin, gender, age, and education performance history all had an impact that directly correlated to college level academic retention and the ability to persist through graduation. There is large scale research that suggests if a student is from a diverse background, male, performed poorly in high school and on a college entrance exams, the likelihood of graduation for that student is strongly diminished beyond the first few classes or semesters (Lorenzetti, 2010).
  • Problem Description The problem involved undergraduate students at University of Phoenix who were not completing their degree programs. Retention of campus undergraduate students was declining and this study served to explore and determine the variables responsible for the identified gap in retention. A wide array of variables were identified that may have play a significant role in the retention problem. The University of Phoenix Annual Academic Report touched on some of these variables that included a greater diversity in student populations than ever before and a future gap in the education level of recent generations. (University of Phoenix, 2009). Emphasis was be placed on the changing demographics of students entering the university and the characteristics that drew them to the university as well as factors that led them to abandon their degree programs. Consequently, the attrition rate at which students return to finish their program was low and the length of time it took those students who did return to finish a bachelors degree was at least six to eight years. Almost half of the University’s enrollment consisted of students from underserved racial or ethnic communities-well beyond the institutional average nationwide as Chart #1 below illustrates (University of Phoenix, 2009).
  • Problem Documentation One form of documentation utilized to understand this problem was past research on the topic. My team of researchers found a plethora of resources already documented on retention and motivation strategies educators and administrators have used to implement and assist students in degree completion and persevere to graduation. First, the research was able to catalog and identify the various characteristics and triggers that caused students to drop out of college programs and look at similarities and recurring themes in the results. Another form of documentation to measure correlations and causes of the problem were identified and documented through survey results. The surveys associated with this research project is included in this documentation as Appendices “B” and "C". Further documentation was collected through the support services department . This data consisted of the various types of services students receive as part of their tuition that serves to support the students success in their chosen degree program. Specific areas of student services were identified for improvement and programs were selected that needed to be expanded and further developed as possible solutions that would later assist in retention. One of the most attractive aspects of the University of Phoenix was clearly the ease of enrollment for the identified population group. Students entered their respective bachelor’s degree program without entrance exams or placement assessments. The very nature of the open enrollment process at University of Phoenix makes the retention outlook a volatile picture at best. Diverse student populations typically carry substantial risk and therefore a stronger correlation to drop-out rates. Some of these students come into the education system as an academic risk or a financial risk, or both. Since Federal Financial Aid is not dependent upon credit worthiness or income, the qualifications have historically been very loose. Unless a student had a criminal history or an old student loan in default, they would be able to qualify for new federal funds. Tracking risk factors and triggers associated with these risks was crucial to isolating the nature of the retention problem.
  • Taking a closer look, it was easy to identify a strong correlation between open-access universities and lower-retention. As a non-traditional university offering open-access, with easy enrollment for students from all backgrounds and wide socio-economic status, the consequence of open-access brings higher risk factors. If a student drops their program, drops a class, or simply changes their mind, they must still pay for those dropped classes. Most students feel they shouldn't have to pay for a dropped class. However, the end result of a dropped student is bad debt to the university and a default status for the student from the federal government financial aid department. Further exacerbating the situation is the lengthy remedy to correct a default status. They cannot re-enroll at any college or university until the defaulted loan is satisfied or payments on the loan continue for at least six months without incident. Some universities and colleges that are considered "non-traditional" by nature of their enrollment process and ease of admission, set themselves up for retention issues by opening the door to high risk students. The U.S. Department of Education identified top risk factors that interfere with degree completion.
  • Multiple risk factors reduce student retention over time.Student has 2 Risk Factors = 55%Student has 3 Risk Factors = 48%Student has 4 Risk Factors = 40%Student has 5 Risk Factors = 32%Student has 6 Risk Factors - 18%
  • University of Phoenix offers a unique perspective on enrollment to under-served populations making access very easy. They call this process “open enrollment.” Research will show in that open enrollment is a contributing factor in the retention dilemma and impacts university debt. Open enrollment basically offers opportunity to anyone with the desire for higher education but was unable to enroll at other schools or universities for one reason or another such as low standardized test scores, low academic performance in high school, or a wide variety of other barriers students face with acceptance at traditional universities.
  • Goals and Expectations The goals and expectations of this research aimed to identify the factors leading to drop rates at the undergraduate level and overall student satisfaction rates within the population observed. Additionally, the researcher expected to uncover the variables that impact student retention. Two surveys were used as the measurement methods for this study. The first survey would seek to determine data before a solution strategy was implemented. The solution strategy consisted of improved faculty communication and interaction with the population being studied as well as specific student services that were implemented to support the students throughout the remainder of their degree program. Once these strategies were put into place and monitored for a period of one year the same population of students were surveyed again. The outcomes would serve to confirm our expected results that improved communication and involvement by faculty and enhanced student services would impact retention and attrition in a positive way. This measurement approach identified trends where material changes had occurred as a result of the implemented solution strategy. As a result of the implemented strategies, retention rates increased, drop rates declined, and student satisfaction surveys suggest significant changes had occurred resulting in improved overall student retention. At this point in the research, it was deemed conclusive that measurable changes in retention percentages and student satisfaction rates could be attributable to the solution strategy as being successful. Descriptive statistics were used to determine the change in retention. The standard deviation method used in this instance to calculate the likelihood that 4.7% change is due to the solution strategy implementation. A positive change of 1.5 standard deviation or greater in the level of retention and overall student satisfaction demonstrates a correlation with the percentage of student satisfaction in their degree program. Thus, conclusions were drawn that would suggest the improvement plan and strategy developed could be reproduced at other post-secondary institutions with similar results. The desired goal was to increase student retention at the undergraduate level and to increase overall student satisfaction by 5% in the populations used for this research. Expected outcomes included measurement data indicating the influencing factors which led to student drop rates and student motivation to persist with higher education. As expected, analysis of the data did expose outcomes associated with specific influencing factors related to why students chose to leave their education endeavors and what changes made them stay and persevere through completion and onto graduation. After survey #2 was conducted and data was compared to survey#1 from pre-implementation of the solution strategy, my research team discovered changes had occurred in student perceptions and reported the findings. The second data set proved the original hypothesis was true. As prior theories suggest, risk factors and demographic characteristics play a pivotal role in retention and by implementing strategies that focus on personalized services at the university level proved vital to improving motivation that led to increased student retention.
  • Measurement of Outcomes Measurement outcomes were developed through multiple student surveys and compared against existing data produced by the secondary research sources detailed in the literature review. Specific trends identified include, the relationship between student demographics and retention rates, improved student satisfaction from increased faculty communication and interactions, and improved student relations from the student services department. If just 5% or more of students retain in their program this would indicate that several identified variables within the university's control made an impact in retention. This level of significance in the data would indicate success in the solution strategy program described herein and that the strategy could likely be replicated with some modifications for future success. One year after the implementation phase of the solutions strategy, our hypothesis would prove to be true.
  • The problem, as indicated in this study, is a large private university is experiencing retention decline of up to 30% in undergraduate students after they complete their 4th course. Students begin to drop their program on or about their 3rd or 4th class into their undergraduate degree program. Isolating the primary factors of this problem and drawing conclusions from research will assist in developing a solution aimed at retention improvement and change intervention for the long term (Muirhead, 2006). More current research defines some of the variables related to student persistence as demographics related. According to research conducted by the U.S Department of education, gender, race and ethnicity, socioeconomic status, high school grade point average, college grade point average, as well as the interaction between these variables, are all related to persistence. More students of color, and differing ethnic backgrounds are enrolling in college as a result of immigration. More women are enrolling in college than men, and these numbers will continue to rise. Race and ethnicity were statistically significant in many retention studies, as well as high school grade point average and achievement levels on SAT/ACT test scores (Reason, 2009).  "Similarly, Levitz, Noel, & Richter (1999) reported a linear relationship between SAT/ACT and retention. Institutions that report the highest averages of college entrance examination scores for their students had an average first- to second-year retention rate of greater than 91%. Institutions reporting the lowest average scores for their students, or open-door institutions, (University of Phoenix) had retention rates closer to 56%—an attrition rate five times worse." (Levitz, et al, 1999) Discussion The data from the survey would suggest that several possible solution strategies may have an impact on retention improvement. One of the strongest correlations seems to be influenced by classroom environment and faculty communication. Faculty who made individual welcome calls to students developed a stronger bond with students and if they maintained this level of communication retention rates increased for some classes (Legg & Wilson, 2009). The classroom environment was also a major influence toward retention. Students expressed the need to feel welcome and of equality among peers were factors important for their experience.Selected Solutions As a result of preliminary data, together with an initial overview of selected resources available, the following solutions may have a measureable impact on retention among the sample population. The primary reasons undergraduate students choose to drop their program might include several factors. Learning environments and faculty communication or lack thereof might be a contributing factor to student drop rates. Establishing a strong support system including key players like faculty and student support services are an essential piece of the retention puzzle. Holding university employees who directly interact with students more accountable for improvement and implementation of a student services program that is aimed at increasing student retention. While other factors that influence retention may be out of the university's control such as marriage, divorce, the birth of child, or loss of a relative, loss of a job, starting a new job, or other life changing events, student services teams can still offer counseling and support tools. Additionally, social change or demographic changes occurring in society may have a direct impact on retention. Finally, grade point averages in high school and on entrance exam scores seem to play a key role in retention and present a strong argument as a viable solution as well. Colleges and universities with open-access enrollment tend to have lower retention rates simply because these schools attract underserved populations that carry greater risk. Finding and implementing resources for early program students that provide balance and a sense of security means more retained students (University of Phoenix Demographics, 2009).
  • Discussion The data from the survey would suggest that several possible solution strategies may have an impact on retention improvement. One of the strongest correlations seems to be influenced by classroom environment and faculty communication. Faculty who made individual welcome calls to students developed a stronger bond with students and if they maintained this level of communication retention rates increased for some classes (Legg & Wilson, 2009). The classroom environment was also a major influence toward retention. Students expressed the need to feel welcome and of equality among peers were factors important for their experience.Selected Solutions As a result of preliminary data, together with an initial overview of selected resources available, the following solutions may have a measureable impact on retention among the sample population. The primary reasons undergraduate students choose to drop their program might include several factors. Learning environments and faculty communication or lack thereof might be a contributing factor to student drop rates. Establishing a strong support system including key players like faculty and student support services are an essential piece of the retention puzzle. Holding university employees who directly interact with students more accountable for improvement and implementation of a student services program that is aimed at increasing student retention. While other factors that influence retention may be out of the university's control such as marriage, divorce, the birth of child, or loss of a relative, loss of a job, starting a new job, or other life changing events, student services teams can still offer counseling and support tools. Additionally, social change or demographic changes occurring in society may have a direct impact on retention. Finally, grade point averages in high school and on entrance exam scores seem to play a key role in retention and present a strong argument as a viable solution as well. Colleges and universities with open-access enrollment tend to have lower retention rates simply because these schools attract underserved populations that carry greater risk. Finding and implementing resources for early program students that provide balance and a sense of security means more retained students (University of Phoenix Demographics, 2009).
  • Results and Recommendation When this research project was conceived its purpose was to assist the University of Phoenix by increasing retention rates in undergraduate classes for incoming freshman and transferring first semester students. The objective was to identify barriers to retention and find a way to circumvent the hurdles preventing retention from being as high at it could be. The research team looked at divers demographics of students enrolling for undergraduate programs. The team also studied relationships between faculty and students to learn more about how this dynamic works to create a sense of success for the student experience. Additionally, the research team looked at risk factors associated with the open enrollment process and the correlation between multiple risk factors and the impact on retention when risks out number the desire for retention. I think we always knew there was some level of correlation. It wasn't until we started to dig deeper did we uncover the vast amount of information that would lead us to our solution strategy and ultimately to a long-term solution that would produce higher retention rates for the university. The relationships and common thread in all of the research kept focusing our attention on demographics and risk factors, with faculty communication being the weakest link. We found the strongest data in the risk factors to be of particular interest in developing the solutions strategy. Developing a program and resources to address students with risk factors involved hiring additional human capitol at the university and bringing in trained staff to assist with issues such as day-care for students, adding bus line stops to the campus for students without transportation, employment counseling, academic mentors, and student crisis officers to name just a few. These resources alone changed the perception on campus and provided the needed support for those students with the highest risk factors. When comparing the data sets side by side, it is evident in the survey results the level of improved student satisfaction. Our solution strategy not only supports the students, addresses their risk factors, but also gives them resources to solve their own issues and become more accountable for their own success. Finally, the research team presented their action research and data to a group of virtual education majors for feedback and recommendations. Some of the suggested recommendations included conducting interviews with post-secondary faculty to get additional input from their perspective on contributions faculty can implement to aid in the motivation of student retention. Expand the student survey to include specific demographic questions and identify groups based upon background information. This type of information could prove to be valuable in determining support services to students with risk factors. Additional recommendations offered during the outside presentation included making correlations between the type of post-secondary institution, the cost of tuition, and the stakes involved in retention. The premise behind this further research makes the assumption that students enrolled at Ivey League institutions are more likely to graduate and persist in their degree program than a student at a less prestigious or expensive school. The comments and feedback were of value during the outside presentation and require further action research that will be conducted at a later time.
  • References Borrego, A.M. (2002). U.S. department of education will emphasize retention in next higher education act. Chronicle of Higher Education, (19)7, 20-21.Buglear, J. (2009). Logging in and dropping out: exploring student non-completion in higher education using electronic footprint analysis. Journal of Further & Higher Education, 33(4), 381-393. doi:10.1080/03098770903272479.Hackman, R., & Oldham, G. (1980). Work Redesign. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.Hovdaughen, E.& Aamodt, P. (2009). Learning environment: relevant or not to students' decision to leave university? Quality in Higher Education, (15)2, 177-189.Huett, J., Kalinowski, K., Moller, L.,Huett, K. C.(2009). Improving the Motivation and Retention of Online Students Through the use of ARCS-Based E-Mails. American Journal of Distance Education. Jul 2008, (22)3, 159-176Legg, A. & Wilson, J. (2009). E-mail from professor enhances student motivation and attitudes. Teaching of Psychology, 36(3), 205-211.Levitz, R. S., Noel, L., & Richter, B. J. (1999). Strategic moves for retention success. In G.H. Gaither (Ed.), Promising practices in recruitment,remediation, and retention (pp. 31–50). (New Directions for Higher Education, n. 108) San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Lorenzetti, J.P (2010). Ten critical persistence factors affecting online community college students. Recruitment & Retention in Higher Education, (24)3, 1-6.McMillan, J. & Schumacher, S. (2006). Research in Education: Evidence based Inquiry, Appendix D (6th ed.). Boston, Pearson Education.Muirhead, B. (2006). Academic research presentations: practical advice for today's graduate students. International Journal of Instructional Technology & Distance Learning, (20)4, 33-38.National Center for Education Statistics, Special Analysis, 2002. Non-Traditional Undergraduates. http://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/2002/analysis/nontraditional/index/asp.National Center for Education Statistics. University of Phoenix, (2009). Demographics Figures & Charts, (2007). Reason, R. (2009). Student variables that predict retention: recent research and new developments. NASPA Journal (National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, Inc.), 46(3), 482-501. Retrieved from Education Research Complete database.Seidman, Alan, (2006). College student retention: a primmer.Center for the Study of College Student Retention.University of Phoenix, (2009). Annual Academic Report. Phoenix Arizona. 
  • Transcript

    • 1. Action Research Proposal<br />Leslie McGinn/EDD580/July 5, 2010 <br />Motivation Strategies Impacting Undergraduate Retention<br />
    • 2. Problem Statement<br /> The problem, as indicated in this study, involved a large private university that was experiencing retention decline of up to 30% in undergraduate students after they complete their 4th course. Students began to drop their program on or about their 3rd or 4th class into their undergraduate degree program. <br />
    • 3. Purpose<br />Identify factors related to declining retention<br />Increased student drop rates<br />Isolate the culprits<br />Conduct research<br />Survey current students<br />Implement solution strategy<br />Repeat survey<br />Report and Recommend<br />
    • 4. Work Setting<br />Largest Private University<br />Campus classrooms (2)<br />Undergraduate students<br />Freshman<br />New students<br />At risk students<br />Adjunct faculty<br />Open enrollment access<br />
    • 5. Writers Role<br />Teacher<br />Researcher<br />Graduate student<br />Stakeholder<br />Life-Long Learner<br />
    • 6. Causative Analysis<br />At Risk Students<br />Socio-economic factors<br />Background influences<br />Open Enrollment<br />Underserved populations<br />Ease of enrollment<br />University accountability<br />
    • 7. Problem Description<br />Declining Retention in undergraduate freshman students<br />Drop out rate increasing<br />Quality of Student Services <br />High Risk students<br />Changing demographics<br />Underserved populations<br />Faculty Involvement<br />
    • 8. Problem Documentation<br />
    • 9. Risk Factors<br />Gender-Male<br />Race-Minority<br />Socio-economic status-poor<br />Single Parents<br />Employed Part-time<br />No academic support system<br />Not prepared for the demands of college life<br />Performed poorly in high school<br />
    • 10. Risk Factors<br />
    • 11. Open Enrollment<br />Easy access<br />No entrance exams required<br />No waitlists<br />Little or no application fees<br />Underserved populations<br />Attractive to high risk students<br />Attract diverse populations<br />High pressure enrollment <br />
    • 12. Expected Outcomes<br />Identify retention factors <br />Implement<br />Change in retention rates<br />Increase in graduation rates<br />Improve faculty communication<br />Improve student services<br />Provide resources for at risk students<br />
    • 13. Measurement Outcomes<br />Student surveys<br />Identify trends<br />Increase retention by 5%<br />1.5 standard deviation or greater in the level of retention <br />Create positive change<br />Increase student satisfaction<br />
    • 14. Solution Strategy<br />Identify risk factors<br />Implement new student services program<br />Offer resources such as on campus child care, on-campus housing, employment assistance<br />Increase faculty communication and interaction<br />Update learning environments<br />Remediation for low high school achievers<br />
    • 15. Results<br />Compare both survey results<br />Document change in student satisfaction<br />Solution strategy emulation<br />Program can be replicated<br />New services provide needed support<br />Higher retention after implementation<br />Lower drop rates after implementation<br />
    • 16. Recommendation<br />Revisit the costs associated with new student services and revise as necessary<br />Select committee to oversee program<br />Review and revise annually<br />Speaking opportunities at other colleges to share program success.<br />Publish articles in education journals about the solution strategy success.<br />
    • 17. References<br /> <br />Borrego, A.M. (2002). U.S. department of education will emphasize retention in next higher education act. Chronicle of Higher Education, (19)7, 20-21.<br />Buglear, J. (2009). Logging in and dropping out: exploring student non-completion in higher education using electronic footprint analysis. Journal of Further &amp; Higher Education, 33(4), 381-393. doi:10.1080/03098770903272479.<br />Hackman, R., &amp; Oldham, G. (1980). Work Redesign. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.<br />Hovdaughen, E.&amp; Aamodt, P. (2009). Learning environment: relevant or not to students&apos; decision to leave university? Quality in Higher Education, (15)2, 177-189.<br />Huett, J., Kalinowski, K., Moller, L.,Huett, K. C.(2009). Improving the Motivation and Retention of Online Students Through the use of ARCS-Based E-Mails. American Journal of Distance Education. Jul 2008, (22)3, 159-176<br />Legg, A. &amp; Wilson, J. (2009). E-mail from professor enhances student motivation and attitudes. Teaching of Psychology, 36(3), 205-211.<br />Levitz, R. S., Noel, L., &amp; Richter, B. J. (1999). Strategic moves for retention success. In G.H. Gaither (Ed.), Promising practices in recruitment,remediation, and retention (pp. 31–50). (New Directions for Higher Education, n. 108) San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.<br />Lorenzetti, J.P (2010). Ten critical persistence factors affecting online community college students. Recruitment &amp; Retention in Higher Education, (24)3, 1-6.<br />McMillan, J. &amp; Schumacher, S. (2006). Research in Education: Evidence based Inquiry, Appendix D (6th ed.). Boston, Pearson Education.<br />Muirhead, B. (2006). Academic research presentations: practical advice for today&apos;s graduate students. International Journal of Instructional Technology &amp; Distance Learning, (20)4, 33-38.<br />National Center for Education Statistics, Special Analysis, 2002. Non-Traditional Undergraduates. http://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/2002/analysis/nontraditional/index/asp.<br />National Center for Education Statistics. University of Phoenix, (2009). Demographics Figures &amp; Charts, (2007). <br />Reason, R. (2009). Student variables that predict retention: recent research and new developments. NASPA Journal (National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, Inc.), 46(3), 482-501. Retrieved from Education Research Complete database.<br />Seidman, Alan, (2006). College student retention: a primmer.Center for the Study of College Student Retention.<br />University of Phoenix, (2009). Annual Academic Report. Phoenix Arizona.<br /> <br />

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