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Creating and organizing literate environments ppt niu 6.24.13

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  • CJ
  • LB
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  • LBCraig’s list, rummage sales, back-to-school sales

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  • 1. C R E A T I N G A N D O R G A N I Z I N GA L I T E R A T E E N V I R O N M E N T C O N D U C I V E T O L E A R N I N GGETTING STARTED WITH THECOMPREHENSIVE LITERACY MODELLEANNE BONGERS CANDICE JOHNSONCLM MODEL CLASSROOM TEACHER GRADES 3-5 LITERACY COACHbongersl@fortschools.org johnsonc@fortschools.orgSchool District of Fort Atkinson - Wisconsinwww.fortschools.org and www.fortschoolspcl.orgJune 2013GO!
  • 2. MEET THE PRESENTERS
  • 3. GETTING A PULSE:HEARING ALL VOICES
  • 4. GETTING STARTED WITH CLM:CREATING AND ORGANIZING A LITERATEENVIRONMENT• The purpose of this document is to help you getstarted setting up your CLM classroom. The ESAILtool, developed by Dr. Linda Dorn, describes thecriterion required for you to create and organizeyour “model classroom.” The following informationaligns to the ESAIL criterion to help you make sureyou have all the components needed to ensurestudents progress and achieve in literacy.*ESAIL published in Interventions That Work (Dorn & Soffos, 2011a)
  • 5. GETTING STARTED WITH CLM :CREATING AND ORGANIZING A LITERATEENVIRONMENT• You may already have some of these components inplace, which is great! You may find the need to “tweak”a few things to better align with criteria, or you mayneed to open your mind to start something new!Whatever the case, you will have the support of acoach and other model classroom teachers to help youalong the way!• Many people find the process of redesigning theirclassrooms to be a breath of fresh air. The key is always“less is more,” so many people purge and start with ablank slate. Opening your mind to rearranging yourclassroom to better support literacy instruction is the keyto starting anew!
  • 6. T H E H E A R T B E A T O F T H E C L A S S R O O MDESIGNING THECLASSROOM LIBRARY:
  • 7. IMPLEMENTATION OF ANORGANIZED CLASSROOM LIBRARY• ESAIL CRITERION 2: ORGANIZES THE CLASSROOM• Descriptor 6: Classroom libraries contain an abundant amountof reading material across genres, authors and topics.• Descriptor 8: Books in classroom library are organized andlabeled according to genre, topic and/or by author.• PURPOSE:• Provides students with easy access to rich, diverse, high-qualityliterature• CLM MODEL CLASSROOM GOAL:• Create a space for the classroom library to become the“heartbeat” of the classroom with rich, diverse, high-qualityliterature as the central focus
  • 8. HOW TO GET STARTED:Use $500 stipend to purchase books to build up and diversify your classroom library• Focus on purchasing nonfiction and persuasive/argumentative texts to align with CCSSexpectations• Purchase texts that align with genre focus/units ofstudy
  • 9. HOW TO GET STARTED:Design and create an inviting classroom library spaceOrganize library with shelving easily accessible to studentsThings to add to your library….• rugs• lamps• couch/chairs/futon• flowers/plants• art• stuffed animals of bookcharacters
  • 10. HOW TO GET STARTED:• Lamps• Rugs• Shelving• Books easilyaccessible
  • 11. HOW TO GET STARTED:• Lamps• Gaming Chairs
  • 12. HOW TO GET STARTED:•Maybe a bathtub?!Ask: What makes yourspace special yetpromotes learning andliteracy?
  • 13. HOW TO GET STARTED:Rotate whosits in thetub orspecialchairs eachweek sothere isnever anyquestion!
  • 14. HOW TO GET STARTED:* Old chairs
  • 15. HOW TO GET STARTED:Organize books into bins (1 color fiction, 1 color nonfiction,and 1 color mixed fiction/nonfiction)white baskets for fictiongrey baskets for mixedfiction and nonfictionblue baskets for nonfiction
  • 16. HOW TO GET STARTED:Organize book bins by applying appropriate labelspurple labels for genre/topic/themesyellow labels for authors/serieswhite labels formixed fictionand nonfiction
  • 17. HOW TO GET STARTED:Add labels to books so they can easily be returned to the correct bins• Book label shouldmatch label onbin/basket• Consider having a“Help Me” basketwhere students canplace books if theycannot find thebin/basket wherethe book belongs
  • 18. HOW TO GET STARTED:Organize book bins by applying appropriate labels
  • 19. HOW TO GET STARTED:Organize book bins by applying appropriate labels•White baskets with purplelabels (fiction genres)•Blue baskets with purplelabels (non-fiction genres)* Truly the „heartbeat‟ of ourclassroom – we spend a lot oftime in our classroom library…
  • 20. HOW TO GET STARTED:Add labels to books so they can easily be returned to the correct bins* Red Dot: Indicates it isa mentor text. Studentsmay read but the bookcannot leave the room!
  • 21. Learning fromdifferentmentor textstransfers intostudents‟Thoughtful Logsfor students topracticestrategiesindependently.Mentor Texts
  • 22. HOW TO GET STARTED:Organize book bins by applying appropriate labels* Grey baskets formentor texts usedthroughout the year for6-traits and genres
  • 23. HOW TO GET STARTED:Establish routines for using the classroom library, checking out books, and selecting texts
  • 24. HOW TO GET STARTED:Establish routines for using the classroom library and checking out books by creating acheck-out schedule/day to use the library• Create a check-outschedule forstudents to use thelibrary• Helps to fosterpurposeful use oflibrary and purposefulselection of texts• Students can thenuse most ofindependent readingtime every day forREADING
  • 25. HOW TO GET STARTED:*Considerclosing offyourclassroomlibrary untilstudents learnhow to use it.*Having alibrary in theclassroom is aPRIVILEGE!
  • 26. HOW TO GET STARTED:*Co-construct aletter to yourprincipal to invitehim or her to bethe ribbon cutter atthe opening ofyour classroomlibrary!
  • 27. C R E A T E A N D D E S I G N S P A C E S F O R P L A N N I N G ,T E A C H I N G , A N D L E A R N I N GIMPLEMENTATION OF AWELL-ORGANIZED CLASSROOM:
  • 28. IMPLEMENTATION OF AWELL-ORGANIZED CLASSROOM• ESAIL CRITERION 2: ORGANIZES THE CLASSROOM• Descriptor 2: Classroom is designed for whole group, small group andindividual teaching and learning.• Descriptor 3: Teachers’ workspace and instructional materials areorganized for teaching and learning.• Descriptor 4: Students’ materials are organized and easily accessible.• Descriptor 7: Literature for daily instruction is organized and accessible.• PURPOSE:• Provides students with organizational skills and strategies needed to meetthe rigorous demands and daily routines of the reading and writingworkshop• CLM MODEL CLASSROOM GOAL:• Design and organize the classroom environment to reflect the value andimportance of literacy learning to facilitate easy access to literacy tools forteacher and students
  • 29. HOW TO GET STARTED:Design and organize whole group learning area to accommodate space for all learners withsupplies readily and easily accessible (i.e. easel, anchor chart paper, markers, highlighter tape,mentor texts)• Design space forwhole-groupinstruction• close to SMARTBoard• close to documentcamera• area rug for students togather• organize space in easelto have makers,highlighter tape, post-its,mentor texts etc. (deskdrawer organizers workwell on the shelf in theeasel)
  • 30. WHOLE-GROUPINSTRUCTION•Back carpet area w/easel -or-• Desks facingSmartboard
  • 31. HOW TO GET STARTED:Design and organize small-group teaching area to accommodate all learners withsupplies readily and easily accessible (i.e. table, chairs, tabletop easel, guidedreading/literature discussion group texts, pencils)• Design spacenext to tableto organizematerials forsmall-groupinstruction• pull-outdrawers foreach group• bins for eachgroup• drawers withpost-its/pens/tapeeasilyaccessible
  • 32. HOW TO GET STARTED:Design and organize teacher instructional materials(teacher manuals, lesson plan book, formative assessment binders, teacherdesk/bookshelves, etc.)
  • 33. DesksDesks (24 Kids)DesksDesksDesksStorage Small-GroupWork TableShelvingSmall-GroupInstructionTubWhole-GroupCarpetAreaShelvingShelvingStorageTeacherDeskStorageSmall-GroupWork Area/Comfy ChairsDoorSmartboard
  • 34. HOW TO GET STARTED:Design and organize storage and display of mentor texts for easy access(bins, bookshelves, display ledge, crates, etc.)
  • 35. HOW TO GET STARTED:* Have space forstudents to accessmentor texts after youuse them.
  • 36. HOW TO GET STARTED:Provide organizational tools for students (i.e. independent reading boxes, writingprocess binders/portfolios, published writing portfolios, seat chair covers)• Provide students withindependent readingboxes/literacy bins tostore…• read-to-self books• thoughtful logs• writing process binders• Provide students withseat chair covers tostore…• whiteboards• erasers• markers• clipboards
  • 37. HOW TO GET STARTED:Provide a space for a “writing center” so students can easily access writing processtools independently and a writing process binder for independent writing• Provide students with…• dictionaries• thesauri• drawers/bins for writing processtools• prewrite sheets• draft paper• revising/editing checklists• Provide students with a writingprocess binder or folder tohelp them organize suppliesand texts for independentwriting• folder/sleeve for each stage ofthe process• pouch for draft/revise/edit pens
  • 38. HOW TO GET STARTED:* Bins withstudentswritingbinders,ThoughtfulLogs, andind. readingbooks
  • 39. H O N O R A N D V A L I D A T E T H E I M P O R T A N T W O R KO F R E A D E R S A N D W R I T E R SDISPLAYING STUDENT WORK:
  • 40. DISPLAYING STUDENT WORK• ESAIL CRITERION 1: CREATES A LITERATE ENVIRONMENT• Descriptor 1: Reading responses through writing (thoughtful logentries) are displayed on walls and in hallways.• Descriptor 2. Writing drafts and/or published pieces aredisplayed on walls and in hallways.• PURPOSE:• Honors students and validates their work as readers and writers• Makes learning and thinking visible to a larger community ofreaders and writers• CLM MODEL CLASSROOM GOAL:• Change displayed worked quarterly (minimally)
  • 41. HOW TO GET STARTED:Find wall space in classroom and hallway to display thoughtful log entriesand writer’s workshop pieces• Find space in classroomand hallway to displaywriting from writer‟sworkshop• consider adding “Meetthe Author” biographiesnext to work to validatework as real authors• change work minimallyonce a quarter
  • 42. HOW TO GET STARTED:Find wall space in classroom and hallway to display thoughtful log entriesand writer’s workshop pieces• Find space in classroomand hallway to displaywriting about reading /thoughtful log entries• consider titling space“Thoughtful Responses”• provides students with“mentor texts” of quality,deep, thick writtenresponses to writing• consider postingthoughtful log responsesfrom LDGs
  • 43. HOW TO GET STARTED:Find wall space in classroom and hallway to display thoughtful log entriesand writer’s workshop pieces
  • 44. HOW TO GET STARTED:* Thoughtful Responses
  • 45. HOW TO GET STARTED:Find wall space in classroom and hallway to display thoughtful log entriesand writer’s workshop pieces
  • 46. M A K E T H I N K I N G A N D L E A R N I N G V I S I B L EIMPLEMENT CO-CONSTRUCTEDANCHOR CHARTS:
  • 47. IMPLEMENTING CO-CONSTRUCTEDANCHOR CHARTS• ESAIL CRITERION 1: CREATES A LITERATE ENVIRONMENT• Descriptor 4: Co-constructed language charts embrace studentlanguage and are displayed on walls and in students’ notebooks.• PURPOSE:• Makes learning and thinking visible• Promotes acquisition and transfer of skills as learning moves from thewall (anchor chart), to the thoughtful log (resource tool forhelp/problem-solving), to the brain (self-regulation)• CLM MODEL CLASSROOM GOAL:• Create co-constructed anchor charts across the curriculum in ALLsubject areas• Organize display of anchor charts to make them easy to find andaccess
  • 48. HOW TO GET STARTED:Organize display of anchor charts to make them easy to find and access bylabeling/grouping them and designating wall space for each subject area• Usesentencestrips toorganizeanddisplayanchorcharts
  • 49. HOW TO GET STARTED:Organize display of anchor charts to make them easy to find and access bylabeling/grouping them and designating wall space for each subject area•Anchors teaching point•Co-constructed
  • 50. HOW TO GET STARTED:Organize display of anchor charts to make them easy to find and access bylabeling/grouping them and designating wall space for each subject area* Displayed inlayers foreasy access
  • 51. HOW TO GET STARTED:Organize display of anchor charts to make them easy to find and access bylabeling/grouping them and designating wall space for each subject area
  • 52. area* „Anchor‟learningfrom allsubjectareas
  • 53. Anchor charts eventually transfer into Thoughtful Logs to promoteindependence.
  • 54. W H A T T O T E A C H T H E F I R S T 2 0 D A Y SMOVING INTO EXPLICIT,HIGH-QUALITY INSTRUCTION:
  • 55. WHAT TO TEACH THE FIRST 20 DAYS• CLASSROOM ROUTINES/PROCEDURES• Teach Independent Reading Expectations (See slide 62.)• 1. Find a spot to read.• 2. Start reading right away.• 3. Read the whole time (independent book or LDG text).• 4. Be strategic…use strategies to help you comprehend!• 5. Flag thinking or respond in thoughtful log.• Teach Independent Writing Expectations• 1. Find a spot to write.• 2. Start writing right away.• 3. Write the whole time.• 4. Use the writing process and think about the 6 Traits.• 5. Conference and reflect to make your writing stronger.• Teach Turn and Talk Expectations• 1. Sit elbow-elbow-knee-knee.• 2. Make eye contact.• 3. Think about what is being said.• 4. Say something meaningful.• 5. Use a 1-2 voice level.
  • 56. WHAT TO TEACH THE FIRST 20 DAYS• CLASSROOM ROUTINES/PROCEDURES• Teach use of classroom library and selecting/previewing text.• (See slides 23 and 24.)• Teach purposeful use of the thoughtful log.• 1. How to write about your thinking. (See slides 57-62.)• 2. How to use each section of the log. (See slide 63.)• Teach use of purposeful talk (See slide 64.)• 1. Hear All Voices (See slide 65.)• 2. Say Something Meaningful• 3. Listen with Intent• 4. Keep the Lines of Thinking Alive (See slide 66.)• 5. Be Flexible with Your Thinking.• Develop Common Expectations for Whole-Group Meeting/InstructionSpace• 1. Sit criss-cross with hands in lap.• 2. Zero voice level.• 3. Supplies on the floor in front of you.• 4. Sit by someone who will help you learn.• 5. Eyes on the speaker and think about the learning.
  • 57. Guided Practice: Students „tryon the skill‟ in close proximity tothe teacher moments after youteach itGUIDEDPRACTICE:
  • 58. Grades K-2 Thoughtful LogTABS:- My Thoughts- Genre Learning- Powerful Words & Phrases- Word WorkGrades 3-5 Thoughtful LogTABS:- My Thoughts- Genre Learning- Powerful Words & Phrases- Author’s Craft- My Strategies
  • 59. -Explicitly teach eachof these using mini-lesson protocol-Teach each skillwithout text first-Then teach each skillusing textPurposefulTalk
  • 60. HEARING ALL VOICES
  • 61. Keep the Lines of Thinking Alive- Model weak andstrong examples
  • 62. WHAT TO TEACH THE FIRST 20 DAYS• Teach the 10 STRATEGIC READING BEHAVIORS,Teaching for Deep Comprehension, CHAPTER 4, P. 42• Reread• Preview and survey text• Ask questions before, during, and after reading• Read aloud to clarify thinking• Use story structure, text genre, and writing conventions• Use text aids to extend meaning• Mark texts and record notes (flag thinking)• Use context clues to infer meaning• Write about your thinking in your thoughtful log. Discuss ideaswith others