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Using visuals to convey information

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ICEIS 2004 cnference

ICEIS 2004 cnference

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    • 1. Using Visuals to convey information Luís Manuel Borges Gouveia [email_address] Multimedia Resource Centre Fernando Pessoa University Porto - Portugal ICEIS 2004 Conference, 14-17 April
    • 2. Way One: virtual reality
    • 3. Way two: ubiquitous computing
    • 4. “ Two way” integration: visualisation
      • definition : use of images and animations to convey information
      • goal :effectively convey information to the user
        • transforms the abstract and symbolic into the geometric
        • harnesses the human perception system (visual?)
    • 5. Motivation
      • different representations can enhance the understanding level of a particular problem [ Tufte ].
      • the form of representation makes a dramatic difference in the ease of the task [ Norman ].
      • Norman proposes that external representations, that can be part of a workspace shared with others, require some sort of constructed device to support them: an artefact.
      • is proposed an interface that tries to remove the computer as an object of perception, allowing the user to interact directly with the generated environment as discussed by [ Hubbold et al ].
    • 6. Example one: using old fashion text Semantic Maps
      • strategy for graphically representing concepts, portraying the schematic relations that compose a concept
      • assumes that there are multiple relations between a concept and the knowledge that is associated with the concept
      • for any concept there are at least these types of associations:
          • class: the order of things the concept falls into;
          • property: the attributes that define the concept;
          • example: exemplars of the concept.
    • 7. Example two: using real world images Collaboration allows better performance
    • 8. Information Visualisation examples Example of a hyperstructure Dave Snowdon, Nottimgham Univ. Narcissus hyperstructure Birmingham University
    • 9. Information Visualisation examples VisuaLinda (visualize the execution of parallel processes) Koike Labs, University of Electro-communications, Tokyo FSN (fusion) file system navigator Landscape metaphor, Silicon Graphics
    • 10. Information Visualisation examples LyberWorld (navigation cones visualisation) Matthias Hemmje, GMD, Germany LyberWorld (RelevanceSphere visualisation) Matthias Hemmje, GMD, Germany
    • 11. Information Visualisation examples VR-Vibe (searching visualisation) Steve Benford et al., GMD, Germany Internet Foyer (collaborative visualisations) Brown, Benford, and Snowdon, Univ. of Nottingham Overview of the Internet Foyer A group of users around a web page
    • 12. Visualisation (why?)
      • 3D visualisation can offer a more convenient and natural way for people to interact with information spaces (as distinct from environments that are naturally 3D) [ Tufte ] and [ Benedikt ].
      • to date, there is not much evidence to support it, other than in cases where the information has a natural spatial component [ Hubbold et al. ]
      • many problems still exist, as user sense of position that can be lost if the layout changes [ Ingram and Benford ]
    • 13. Visualisation (task approach)
      • an application for testing the visualisation design:
        • information discovery: support user efforts to find relevant information within a given knowledge domain [ Li-Jen and Gaines, 1998 ]
        • setting up a context, a query generation tool and an Information Visualisation [ Card et al., 1999 ]; providing context and information about a particular data source for analysis and comparison.
      • based on a given context shared as a 3D interactive visualisation, users can be assisted to retrieve information and analyse it ― information discovery [ Baeza-Yates and Ribeiro-Neto, 1990 ]
    • 14. One last example: ViDESK
      • prototype (3D interactive visualisation) goals:
        • convey information about a structure for knowledge sharing
        • test how this could support knowledge sharing by proposing a particular system to give support to users in information discovery
        • help users to build their own queries by using a textual search engine based on information from the structure for knowledge sharing
        • allows the visualisation of data source information within the visualisation design and displaying of results using an HTML browser
    • 15. Concept space visualisation
    • 16. Concept space visualisation
    • 17. Mapping concepts in criteria space
    • 18. Information Visualisation in criteria space
    • 19. Accessing results
    • 20. Concluding remarks
      • use of visualisation techniques can improve the interface by supporting familiar cues to user perception and thus convey information for knowledge sharing
      • people were able to use the several described visualisation designs as the one presented
      • further research need to be conducted in order to adopt visualisation practices within current information current use
    • 21. The birth of visualisation based software?

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