The Drama Times     Sunday, March 20, 468 Est. 490                                                                        ...
Victory! ctnd.                                                        2AAeschylus shares his experience of the battle with...
3A             A Knight of                       Greg Barnes              LaughterAristophanes‟ comedy “The Knights” is cu...
Oracle ctd.                                                                 4A                                            ...
INTERVIEW WITH SOPHOCLES                                                                                                  ...
Theater of                                       6A                                                                       ...
Entertainment   7A
Entertainment Ctnd.     Word Scramble               Word Search                     S   D   S   Q   S   O   S   K   E   N ...
Works CitedBattles of Marathon and Salamis. n.d. Skidmore University. Skidmore.edu. Web. 13 Mar.2011.Christina. “History L...
Interesting WebsitesInterviewhttp://www.enotes.com/oedipus-trilogy/introductionTheater Reviewhttp://www.grisel.net/dionysu...
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Greek drama and its origins

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Greek drama and its origins

  1. 1. The Drama Times Sunday, March 20, 468 Est. 490 Price 2d Reviews The OraclePlays Victory! Allyson Behrens Each week the OracleOur critic attends the selects three luckynew comedy “The individuals to receive aKnights” from playwright glimpse into their future.Aristophanes and shares This week, in honor ofhis honest opinion.Continued 3A our new theater, the oracle has selectedTheater Sophocles, Aeschylus,Our theater critic Jackie and Euripides. Only the Leary Oracle can foresee whatanalyzes the Theater of We have beaten Xerxes and hisDionysus. Persian army. Outnumbered, our the future holds for these young gentlemen. Continued 6A Greek fleet used great cunning Interview Continued 4A and smart strategies to fool the Virginie YangEntertainment Persians, allowing for our victory. We talk to Sophocles7A Our great Father of Drama, about his new trilogy,Comics and games Aeschylus, shares his Oedipus and his future
  2. 2. Victory! ctnd. 2AAeschylus shares his experience of the battle with us in a poem:The night was passing, and the Grecian host At first the current of the Persian hostBy no means sought to issue forth unseen. Withstood; but when within the strait theBut when indeed the day with her white throngsteeds Of ships was gathered, and they couldHeld all the earth, resplendent to behold, not aidFirst from the Greeks the loud-resounding Each other, but by their own brazen bowsdin Were struck, they shattered all our navalOf song triumphant came; and shrill at once host.Echo responded from the island rock. The Grecian vessels not unskillfullyThen upon all barbarians terror fell, Were smiting round about; the hulls ofThus disappointed; for not as for flight shipsThe Hellenes sang the holy pæan then, Were overset; the sea was hid fromBut setting forth to battle valiantly. sight,The bugle with its note inflamed them all; Covered with wreckage and the death ofAnd straightway with the dip of plashing oars men;They smote the deep sea water at Aeschylus fought in both the The reefs and headlands were withcommand, Battle of Marathon and Salamis corpses filled,And quickly all were plainly to be seen. And in disordered flight each ship wasTheir right wing first in orderly array rowed,Led on, and second all the armament As many as were of the Persian host.Followed them forth; and meanwhile there But they, like tunnies or some shoal ofwas heard fish,A mighty shout: “Come, O ye sons of With broken oars and fragments of theGreeks, wrecksAt once ship smote on ship with The Persian Invasions have influenced much ofMake free your country, make your children Struck us and clove us; and at once a cryfree, beak;brazen Of lamentation filled the briny sea,Your wives, the Greeksof your theA vessel of and fanes began ancestral Aeschylus writings and rumor has it that the Battle Till the black darkness‟ eye did rescuegods, us.attack,And your the stem of a For all we nowCrushing sires‟ tombs! Phoenician of Salamis and Xerxes will make appearances in The number of our griefs, not though ten
  3. 3. 3A A Knight of Greg Barnes LaughterAristophanes‟ comedy “The Knights” is currently showingat the theatre in Athens. In this writer‟s opinion it is wellworth it just to hear the playwright‟s response to Cleon‟sdisapproval. The play clearly labels the aforementioneddemagogue as an inequitable and cajoling public figure.Starting with the characters of Demosthenes and Niciasto the Knights played by the Chorus every character hasmultiple lines laced with funny. The humor is subtle attimes and juvenile at others. The comedic performancecenters on the struggle between Cleon and Agoracritusto determine who will be the steward of Demos. Asparts in the play. The masks they use speaking iscustomary three actors play all of the main disguise and the skene are beautifully for rendered. The actors play their parts well, specifically the sections where Cleon and Agoracritus resort to childish yelling at one another. It grows louder and louder before terminating in nearly incoherent streams of insults. This play is definitely worth risking the offense it might cause the powerful men of Athens. With this offering Aristophanes has
  4. 4. Oracle ctd. 4A Sophocles You will marry twice throughout your life and will father two sons. You will win first place in the Aeschylus Dionysian competition of AthensThroughout your life you will write twenty times. Of the times you doapproximately ninety plays. Only seven will not win you will never receivesurvive over time. In 1990 AD, lower than second place. You willapproximately 2000 years after it had not only be known as an Euripidesinitially been lost, your play, Achilles, will be accomplished playwright but you It is sad to say that you will notdiscovered in Egypt among the remains of will also serve in the military and in be appreciated for youran ancient mummy. You will spend much of government. You will pass away at accomplishment until long afteryour life fighting the war against the nearly one hundred years old in your death in 406 BC. At thePersians. You will write a play about the war the year 405 BC. Before your Dionysian competitions, you willwhich will become an important tool in the death you will have written over win the fewest prizes of all theunderstanding of this time in Greek history. one hundred plays, many of which tragedians. Throughout theYour life will end abruptly in Gela in the year456 BC when a turtle is dropped on your will be lost over time. Seven of course of your life you will writehead by a Lammergeyer. Gela will create a your plays will survive, including over ninety plays. You will havemonument in your honor. Before your death Oedipus the King which will remain the largest number of completeyou will personally create the inscription for the most well known of all the plays to survive with a total ofyour gravestone. It will bear no mention of Greek tragedies. (Scribd) eighteen and fragments of ayour accomplishments as a writer but nineteenth. Your play Cyclopsinstead focus on your accomplishments in will be the only complete satyrthe military. The inscription will read "This play to survive. You will begravestone covers Aeschylus, son of remembered as the mostEuphorion, from Athens, who died in fertile intellectual poet of your timeGela. The field of Marathon will speak of his and called the philosopher of
  5. 5. INTERVIEW WITH SOPHOCLES 5ASophocles born in 495 B.C. in Colonus is one of the greatest playwrights of the golden age of Greek Drama. He is son of a wealthymerchant and enjoys all the comforts of a thriving Greek empire. He studied all of the arts. At age twenty-eight with his studiescomplete, he was ready to compete in the City Dionysia where a festival is held every year at the Theatre of Dionysus in which newplays are presented. He is here with us today:Virginie: “Why did you decide to give up acting in your own plays?”Sophocles: “Well, in my first competition, in 468 B.C. I took first prize defeating none other than Aeschylus himself. As an accomplished actor, Ithought I act in many more of my own plays. However, my voice was comparatively weak, and eventually I gave up acting career to pursue otherventures, which bring me to the Oedipus Trilogy.”Virginie: “Why is the play “Oedipus Trilogy” written in three sections?”Sophocles: “The Oedipus Trilogy is a novel that deals with destiny and fate. The spectators are shown a series of events plotted out from whichOedipus one of the main character cannot escape. At the beginning of the play, we must remember our Greek society is based around myths andlegends.. We have a series of gods and muses and fates to explain why things happen. That is the reason why the play has three sections.Virginie: “So can you tell us what the Oedipus Trilogy is about?”Sophocles: “Sure. “Antigone” is written first in 442 B.C. and is actually the ending of the Trilogy. The play that wraps together the final events ofthese characters‟ sad lives begins in Thebes. After her father‟s death, Antigone has returned to the royal palace where she was raised. Her twobrothers Eteocles and Polynices are killed each other in war, as foretold by their father. The new king, Creon, gives an honorable burial to one ofhis nephews, Eteocles, but there is no such mercy for Polynices. Declaring him a traitor, Creon forbids burial of his corpse and promises death toanyone who disobeys this order. Antigone disobey and bury her brother which trigger the drama. I will let you read it. Next I wrote “Oedipus theKing” in 441 B.C., which is the story of a child Oedipus born to the royal couple, Laius and Jocasta. The old king is warned that his son will killhim. In order to avoid fate, they abandon the infant, on the mountainside. Rescued by the shepherd he is delivered to the royal palace at Corinthby a Messenger. Oedipus is raised as the son of the royal house. Life there is good, until Oedipus learns that a prophecy has chosen him as themurderer of his father and the husband of his mother. Hoping to avoid his fate, he leaves the palace. Soon, the wandering Oedipus meets andkills a stranger at a crossroads, and part of the oracle‟s prophecy is fulfilled. He doesn‟t know, but the murdered stranger is Laius, his real father.Continuing his journey, Oedipus enters Thebes—his forgotten first home—as a hero, being the only one to have solved the riddle of themurderous Sphinx. Oedipus‟ reward for solving the riddle is marriage to Jocasta, the Queen of Thebes and widow of Laius. Jocasta doesn‟trecognize Oedipus as her son, and this ill-fated marriage goes forward. Jocasta figures out the secret and kills herself. When he discovers herbody, Oedipus puts out his own eyes. The play closes with Oedipus mourning the destruction of his family, apologizing to his daughters, andbegging Creon, the new king and Jocasta‟s brother, for banishment. His wish is granted. The girls become their Uncle Creon‟s wards, but their ill-fated brothers are left to look out for themselves. The final play written in 406 B.C. “”, which features the blind former king as a shattered old man.His daughter, Antigone, is his loyal companion. Wandering together, they come upon a sacred grove that is protected by the Furies, who are alsoknown as the Eumenides—the protectors of Athens. When he discovers where he is, Oedipus realizes that the last piece of the prophecyforetelling his life is about to be fulfilled. If he is granted shelter there and dies on Athenian soil, his body will draw the blood of the invading forceof Thebes. Back home in Thebes, his two sons are fighting over the throne Oedipus abandoned, and Polynices comes to him seeking help.
  6. 6. Theater of 6A Amechon Blackwell Dionysus There are four major components of the Theater. Orchestra: „dancing space‟- The chorus uses this space to dance, sing, and interact with the actors who were on the stage near the skene. Theatron: „viewing place‟- Is where the spectators will be seen sitting viewing the play. Skene: „tent‟- This area is directly behind the stage and has access to the roof. The tent is where actors enter and exit. The actors also use theIt was here in Athens in 340 BC the world‟s passageways to enter and exit the theater.first theater built of stone and the birthplace Parodos: „passageways‟-This area of the theater isof Greek tragedy was built. The Theater of used for entrance and exits after plays for theDionysus was originally a place to honor the audience.•god Dionysus. The Theater of Dionysus is anoutside theater that seats 17,000 spectatorshaving nearly 300,000 show up to see a play.The plays are performed in the daytime, witha chorus that includes three actors, whowear mask that have exaggerated facialexpressions. Plays by great playwrights suchas Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, andAristophanes will be performed at this
  7. 7. Entertainment 7A
  8. 8. Entertainment Ctnd. Word Scramble Word Search S D S Q S O S K E N E A K I Ce eAlogndG I A E G U L G O E R R C R H R E F S D T F R E A G O H E N K A O Y C S E J Z S Q Q R L D JlspoeSoch N L H S O E E X B T U U I X S T D C Y N H B C Y S E O C E A I E S D R A P E E M N I D M MrceGee G N E E E J I O H Y Q E A O M O Z A M T F Y S S T P R J L S N N A O A H N U R I D H J U Wramad E F B C E P S M R E N U P S P E B J J H T A U V O P I Y H P S N O R T A E H T G D I X O QscAhsluey T R I L O G Y X S E X R E X C M U W D R I D X O B L Z A W Rtaterhe AESCHYLUS ORCHESTRA AGE ORESTEIA ANTIGONE PERSIANS CHORUS SKENE COMEDYtAnneoig SOPHOCLES DIONYSUS THEATER DRAMA THEATRON EURIPEDES THEBES GOLDEN TRILOGYiupsdeEre GREECE XERXES OEDIPUSsipueOd
  9. 9. Works CitedBattles of Marathon and Salamis. n.d. Skidmore University. Skidmore.edu. Web. 13 Mar.2011.Christina. “History Lesson<1000 Words “The Battle of Salamis.”” 30POV.com. n.p. 13 June 2010. Web. 11 Mar. 2011.Ellis, Crystal. “Aeschylus.” CrystalinksGetty Images. Battle of Salamis. n.d. Life.com. Web. 13 Mar. 2011.Englert, Walter. “Ancient Greek Theater.” reed.edu. Hum110 Tech. n.d. Web. 11 Mar. 2011.“Euripedes.” enotes.com. enotes.com, incHarris, S. “What a Lousy Season…” n.d. Cartoonstock.com. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.Hemingway, Colette, and Sean Hemingway. "Ancient Greek Colonization and Trade and Their Influence on Greek Art | Thematic Essay |Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art." The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York: Metmuseum.org. July2007. Web. 16 Mar. 2011.Gonzalez, Grisel. “The Theater of Dionysus.” Grisel.net. n.p. n.d. Web. 12 Mar. 2011.L. Kalmanson. "The Oedipus Trilogy: Introduction." Epics for Students. Ed. Marie Rose Napierkowski. Vol. 0. Detroit: Gale, 1998. eNotes.com.January 2006. 13 March 2011.Jolley, Richard. “I warned you Oedipus…” n.d. Cartooonstock.com. Web. 1 Mar. 2011.Kippen, Cameron. "Shoe Styles of Ancient Greece: Krepis (Crepida)." History of Sandals. Web. 16 Mar. 2011.“Oedipus.” Wikipedia.com. n.p. Web. 12 Mar. 2011.“Oedipus Trilogy.” The Literature Network. Web. 12 Mar. 2011.Professor Robin Mitchell-Boyask. “Biography of Sophocles”. College of Liberal Arts. Temple University. Web. 12 Mar. 2011.“Sophocles Biography”. Pink Monkey.com. n.p. n.d.Web. 12 Mar. 2011.Wilson, Andrew. “Antigone”. The Classics Pages. n.d. Web. 12 Mar. 2011.
  10. 10. Interesting WebsitesInterviewhttp://www.enotes.com/oedipus-trilogy/introductionTheater Reviewhttp://www.grisel.net/dionysus.htmhttp://academic.reed.edu/humanities/110tech/theater.htmlhttp://www.greece-athens.com/page.php?page_id=246Oraclehttp://www.scribd.com/full/49442208?access_key=key-1xsc7q2n7uqsdtj5mztphttp://www.crystalinks.com/aeschylus.htmlhttp://www.enotes.com/authors/euripidesPlay Reviewhttp://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/angk/hd_angk.htmhttp://historyofsandals.blogspot.com/2010/12/krepis-crepida.htmlGameshttp://www.discoveryeducation.com/free-puzzlemaker/Fun Puzzle created by Allyson: http://two.flash-gear.com/npuz/puz.php?c=v&id=2817544&k=76490213Comicshttp://www.cartoonstock.com

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