Copyright in the Digital Age
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Copyright in the Digital Age

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Teacher Resource for professional development. Can be used with attribution.

Teacher Resource for professional development. Can be used with attribution.

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  • What’s the big deal? I’m a teacher. I’m trying to do the best I can for my kids. It’s not like I’m making any money off of using resources I find for my classes. No one is getting hurt by this- and my kids are benefitting.
  • I know a little something about copyright. I know that it’s considered fair use if I want to use something that’s copyrighted in my classroom. I mean, I know it’s ok to show a movie in class as long as I bought it and don’t sell tickets or anything. I make copies of magazine articles all the time to share during class. When we study the 60’s I can play music I have from that time frame...can’t I? I always give credit to the author or artist.
  • Many teachers feel the same as the one in the beginning of this presentation - that just about any educational use is fair use. However, that is isn’t really the case. Fair use policy dictates that while some copyrighted works can be used in the classroom, they must be used in small portions for specific tasks. For instance, copying one part of a series of articles for use on a particular day to support the days lesson would be ok. Distributing the entire series of articles to students to read on their own as enrichment is not - even with attribution.
  • It was a bit easier when the copies came from the copy machine in the office. Now it is easier to provide copies of all sorts of media easily via a network, pen drive, or cd. Why buy a license for a series of musical works when you can just upload a song to your online classroom? Then everyone can hear at when they want. Educational Fair use? or Piracy?
  • If you said Educational Fair Use...time to walk the plank. You can&#x2019;t upload any copyrighted work in it&#x2019;s entirety without explicit permission from the owner. <br /> <br /> In some cases, you can&#x2019;t even share information that won&#x2019;t be seen synchronously with other classmates. This causes a BIG problem for those who are working in the online distance learning environment and run their classes asynchrously.
  • The limits of fair use suddenly became very restrictive to teachers who did not have discreet &#x201C;classrooms&#x201D; or classroom time. Staying within the copyright restrictions and delivering necessary content were suddenly at odds in the online environment. Teachers wanted to stay within the law. Intellectual property right owners wanted to retain some control of their content.
  • Passed in November of 1992, the TEACH act took into consideration the changing needs of students and teachers in the online learning community. Not all learning was done synchronously as it had been in the past. The need to share information via online mediums increased. The previous Copyright Act looked at distance learning as just being geographically removed from the classroom, yet together in the same time. The proliferation of the internet as a teaching medium propelled the government to look at legislation that made it possible for teachers to teach and authors and artists to retain control of their work.
  • The TEACH Act actually works to expand the Fair Use policies that most teachers are familiar with. It essentially expands the parameters of fair use without giving away the farm. The internet provides easier ways for people to steal the work of others. The TEACH act helps prevent that by putting in place several parameters:
  • The TEACH Act actually works to expand the Fair Use policies that most teachers are familiar with. It essentially expands the parameters of fair use without giving away the farm. The internet provides easier ways for people to steal the work of others. The TEACH act helps prevent that by putting in place several parameters:
  • The TEACH Act actually works to expand the Fair Use policies that most teachers are familiar with. It essentially expands the parameters of fair use without giving away the farm. The internet provides easier ways for people to steal the work of others. The TEACH act helps prevent that by putting in place several parameters:
  • 1. The Teach Act only applies to government bodies and accredited non-profit educational organizations. When you are writing your personal blog, you do not have the same permissions to use others work as you do for a class delivered asynchronously. <br /> <br /> It requires that your school have a copyright policy and a way to give information about it to students and staff. Generally the librarian or media specialist gets this duty. <br /> <br /> It also requires that students notified that works used in distance education courses may be copyright protected.
  • The Teach Act doesn&#x2019;t give you carte blanche to use whatever you want in whatever way you would like. For instance, if you have a CD with music you&#x2019;d like to share with your students, you can&#x2019;t just upload those files to your website for free distribution to your students. (think Napster and those ugly lawsuits). Here are some guidelines: <br /> <br /> <br /> 3. Sources you use must be a central part of your lesson, not something used as enhancement outside of class.
  • 1. You may use &#x201C;reasonable and limited portions&#x201D; of tranmissions or other performances that would have been used in a classroom setting. This means that you can&#x2019;t upload a whole movie to your class website, but you can use the pertinent clips.
  • 2. You may NOT use materials that are marketed for commercial use (workbook pages, textbook photos, etc.) unless you have written permission from the author. You must also honor licensing restrictions for online textbooks. If you have rights to one copy of a digital textbook, you can&#x2019;t put it online for all of your students.
  • Your job as a distance educator is to control the use of the materials you share. This applies to copyrighted material - you may do what you wish with your own original content. When possible, limit your students&#x2019; ability to download/copy your copyrighted material. This requires you to learn the tools included in your content management system. Be sure you use tools that give you the security you need.
  • The photos used in this presentation all came from the FlikrCC site- a site that gives the owner of content the ability to share what they like in the way that they want to. The attributes for each photo follow at the bottom of each screen. This is a great resource for educators wanting to use images that are copyright compliant. Creative Commons has several different types of licensing. Be sure to search for images that meet your copyright needs.

Copyright in the Digital Age Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Copyright in the Digital Age Lydia Leimbach
  • 2. What’s the Big Deal?
  • 3. Image: 'Memphis Drive-In' Image: 'metamorphose' www.flickr.com/photos/48199147@N00/540578391 www.flickr.com/photos/21253420@N00/3286677564
  • 4. A Little About Fair Use
  • 5. Now My Classroom Is Digital...and It’s Getting Confusing
  • 6. Image: 'Gulf Pirates' www.flickr.com/photos/10646468@N02/991485930
  • 7. The TEACH Act- More Drama? Or Salvation?
  • 8. The Limits of Fair Use Image: 'frustration' www.flickr.com/photos/76172701@N00/2157057475
  • 9. Image: 'Curiosity..... what are they reading?' www.flickr.com/photos/62424894@N00/312922826 The TEACH Act Backstory
  • 10. Fair Use TEACH ACT How the TEACH Act compliments Fair Use Date
  • 11. Fair Use TEACH ACT How the TEACH Act compliments Fair Use Date
  • 12. TEACH doesn’t apply to everyone
  • 13. Your responsibility
  • 14. Reasonable And Limited Portions Image: 'untitled' www.flickr.com/photos/23829501@N00/1279251301
  • 15. Image: 'The Microscope Book' www.flickr.com/photos/33917831@N00/22452221 No commercially marketed items
  • 16. Downloading Technological Considerations
  • 17. How’d I Get Away With All Those Pictures, Anyway?
  • 18. Works Cited http://flickrcc.bluemountains.net net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERB0413.pdf http://www.utsystem.edu/OGC/IntellectualProperty/copypol2.htm#test Date