Chapter 13:  Clues to Earth’s Past
 
 
Paleontologists study fossils and reconstruct the appearance of animals.
Fossils: remains, imprints, or traces of prehistoric organisms
Fossils can form if the organism is quickly buried by sediments.
Organisms with hard parts are more likely to become fossils than organisms with soft parts.
Types of preservation
Fossils in which spaces inside are filled with minerals from  groundwater are called permineralized remains.
Carbon film results when a thin film or carbon residue forms a silhouette of the original organism; carbonized plant mater...
Mold:  cavity in rock left when the hard parts of an organism decay.
If sediments wash into a mold, they can form a cast of the original organism
Occasionally original remains are preserved in a material such as amber, ice, or tar.
Trace fossils:  evidence of an organism’s activities
Trace fossils can be footprints left in mud or sand that became stone.
Trace fossils can be burrows made by worms and other animals.
Index fossils:  abundant, geographically widespread organisms that existed for relatively short periods of time.
Fossils can reveal information about past land forms and climate.
 
 
 
Section 2:  Relative Ages of Rock
Principle of superposition:  process of reading undisturbed rock layers. <ul><li>Oldest rocks in the bottom layer </li></u...
How old something is in comparison with something else is its “relative age.”
The age of undisturbed rocks can be determined by examining layer sequences.
The age of disturbed rocks may have to be determined by fossils or other clues.
Unconformities:  drastic changes in rock layers
“ Angular unconformity”:  rock layers are tilted, and younger sediment layers are deposited horizontally on top of the ero...
  DISCONFORMITY: 2 SEPARATE REGIONS OF HORIZONTAL ROCK LAYERS INTERUPTED BY UPLIFTING, EROSION FOR A PERIOD OF TIME THEN M...
Nonconformity:  sedimentary rock forms over eroded “metamorphic or igneous rock.”
The same rock layers can be found in different locations; fossils can be used to correlate those rock layers .
Section 3:  Absolute Ages of Rock
Absolute age:  age, in years, of a rock or other object; determined by properties of atoms.
Unstable isotopes break down into other isotopes and particles in the process of radioactive decay.
The time it takes for half the atoms in an isotope to decay is the isotope’s half-life.
Calculating the absolute age of a rock using the ratio of parent isotope to daughter product and the half-life of the pare...
Potassium-argon dating is used to date ancient rocks millions of years old.
Carbon-14 dating is used to date bones, wood, and charcoal up to 75,000 years old.
Earth is estimated to be about 4.5 billion years old; the oldest known rocks are about 3.96 billion years old.
Uniformitatianism:  Earth processes occurring today are similar to those that occurred in the past.
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Chapter 13

1,477

Published on

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,477
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
38
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Chapter 13

  1. 1. Chapter 13: Clues to Earth’s Past
  2. 4. Paleontologists study fossils and reconstruct the appearance of animals.
  3. 5. Fossils: remains, imprints, or traces of prehistoric organisms
  4. 6. Fossils can form if the organism is quickly buried by sediments.
  5. 7. Organisms with hard parts are more likely to become fossils than organisms with soft parts.
  6. 8. Types of preservation
  7. 9. Fossils in which spaces inside are filled with minerals from groundwater are called permineralized remains.
  8. 10. Carbon film results when a thin film or carbon residue forms a silhouette of the original organism; carbonized plant material becomes coal.
  9. 11. Mold: cavity in rock left when the hard parts of an organism decay.
  10. 12. If sediments wash into a mold, they can form a cast of the original organism
  11. 13. Occasionally original remains are preserved in a material such as amber, ice, or tar.
  12. 14. Trace fossils: evidence of an organism’s activities
  13. 15. Trace fossils can be footprints left in mud or sand that became stone.
  14. 16. Trace fossils can be burrows made by worms and other animals.
  15. 17. Index fossils: abundant, geographically widespread organisms that existed for relatively short periods of time.
  16. 18. Fossils can reveal information about past land forms and climate.
  17. 22. Section 2: Relative Ages of Rock
  18. 23. Principle of superposition: process of reading undisturbed rock layers. <ul><li>Oldest rocks in the bottom layer </li></ul><ul><li>Younger rocks in the top layer </li></ul>
  19. 24. How old something is in comparison with something else is its “relative age.”
  20. 25. The age of undisturbed rocks can be determined by examining layer sequences.
  21. 26. The age of disturbed rocks may have to be determined by fossils or other clues.
  22. 27. Unconformities: drastic changes in rock layers
  23. 28. “ Angular unconformity”: rock layers are tilted, and younger sediment layers are deposited horizontally on top of the eroded and tilted layers .
  24. 29. DISCONFORMITY: 2 SEPARATE REGIONS OF HORIZONTAL ROCK LAYERS INTERUPTED BY UPLIFTING, EROSION FOR A PERIOD OF TIME THEN MORE DEPOSITION
  25. 30. Nonconformity: sedimentary rock forms over eroded “metamorphic or igneous rock.”
  26. 31. The same rock layers can be found in different locations; fossils can be used to correlate those rock layers .
  27. 32. Section 3: Absolute Ages of Rock
  28. 33. Absolute age: age, in years, of a rock or other object; determined by properties of atoms.
  29. 34. Unstable isotopes break down into other isotopes and particles in the process of radioactive decay.
  30. 35. The time it takes for half the atoms in an isotope to decay is the isotope’s half-life.
  31. 36. Calculating the absolute age of a rock using the ratio of parent isotope to daughter product and the half-life of the parent is called radiometric dating.
  32. 37. Potassium-argon dating is used to date ancient rocks millions of years old.
  33. 38. Carbon-14 dating is used to date bones, wood, and charcoal up to 75,000 years old.
  34. 39. Earth is estimated to be about 4.5 billion years old; the oldest known rocks are about 3.96 billion years old.
  35. 40. Uniformitatianism: Earth processes occurring today are similar to those that occurred in the past.
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×