Learning Institutions and Communication Technologies - An EDCMOOC Artifact

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I created this digital artifact during the MOOC E-Learning and Digital Cultures. It attempts to express something in a visual way about humans, machines, communication technologies, and the future of …

I created this digital artifact during the MOOC E-Learning and Digital Cultures. It attempts to express something in a visual way about humans, machines, communication technologies, and the future of learning institutions.

More in: Education , Technology
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  • 1. Learning Institutions and Communication Technologies An #EDCMOOC Digital Artifact by Laurence Lachapelle-Bégin This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
  • 2. Today, communicati on technologies are part of human life… ed yourdon| Flickr | CC BY-SA 2.0
  • 3. espinr | Flickr | CC BY 2.0 …and will inscreasingly be.
  • 4. They are already in the hands of students and teachers. Right here. Tommy Huynh | Flickr| CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
  • 5. dcJohn | Flickr| CC BY 2.0 So what does it mean for learning institutions?
  • 6. | Flickr| CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 Students don’t need communication technologies to learn, to be creative, or to socialize.
  • 7. But technologies can help. (So I disagree with you, Lowell Monke.) She’s being creative. They’re engaged in learning. flickingerbrad | Flickr| CC BY 2.0 They’re sharing life experiences (between Thailand and Australia). flickingerbrad | Flickr| CC BY 2.0 superkimbo| Flickr| CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • 8. And they make parts of school work more efficient too. Anyone misses those? ricardo266 | Flickr| CC BY 2.0
  • 9. Will technology replace teachers? dbostrom | Flickr| CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • 10. Not likely for now. Machines can score essays, but are not good at giving feedback. They are. UBC Libraries | Flickr| CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 citrixonline | Flickr| CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
  • 11. Online education Open educational resources tim snell | Flickr| CC BY-ND 2.0 Yet, communication technologies create new learning opportunities.
  • 12. To make the most of it, learning institutions must have a clear picture of the field… The measure of mike| Flickr| CC BY-ND 2.0
  • 13. …and make informed decisions about online learning design and educational technologies. John Daniel’s four B’s are a good tool to weigh things out. VCU Libraries | Flickr| CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  • 14. Pink Sherbet Photography| Flickr| CC BY 2.0 Because a boring face-to-face course…
  • 15. Twaize| Flickr| CC BY –NC-ND 2.0 …will still be boring online.
  • 16. That sounds very posthumanistic… Indeed! mrairie| Flickr| CC BY-SA 2.0 In conclusion, technology is neither good or bad. It is what learning institutions make of it.
  • 17. Deepatheawesome | Flickr| CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 Because in the classroom or online, education is still in human hands.
  • 18. Thank you! Laurence Lachapelle-Bégin Twitter: @llbegin Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/laurencelb