Parent night presentation

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  • www.innovationunit.org
  • We have been receiving several calls from parents asking about what a typical day would look like at the NLC.  One big advantage of this program will be the integrated approach to the curriculum.  The whole grade 8 or grade 9 learning outcomes will be identified.  Over the course of a year students would be covering the entire grade curriculum. The curriculum would be covered through practice and application in their project work. A typical day could look like this:8:45-9:00 Connect time - class connection time with teacher9:00–9:45 Physical activity - in the gym or outside.  Students would pick which activities or sports they would like to participate in.9:45–10:00 Nutrition break/health seminars10:00–11:00 Direct instruction (class) - This would be class time where teacher would be teaching specific items to students.  Content specific skills or ideas that they need to know about in order to proceed with their project.   Student’s classes would be organized based on # of students.11:00–12:00 Direct instruction (seminar) - Break out into small groups where students would be grouped according to interests. Specific skills may need to be taught. Students and teachers may request time to offer direct assistance with specific parts of their project.12:00 12:45 Lunch12:45– 3:00 Project work - After a phasing in time period.  Students would be spending time researching and applying knowledge to complete projects. Some time would be outside the school where connections to real life would me made. This session could be a time to work on solutions, ask questions, consult with teachers, ask experts and apply knowledge. As you can see this timetable offers lots of flexiblity and a whole bunch of freedom to explore. As with many new ideas we need to phase this in. As a grade 8 or 9 student starting this for the first time, this freedom to learning will need to be phased in and taught how to use their time for productive learning.
  • We have been receiving several calls from parents asking about what a typical day would look like at the NLC.  One big advantage of this program will be the integrated approach to the curriculum.  The whole grade 8 or grade 9 learning outcomes will be identified.  Over the course of a year students would be covering the entire grade curriculum. The curriculum would be covered through practice and application in their project work. A typical day could look like this:8:45-9:00 Connect time - class connection time with teacher9:00–9:45 Physical activity - in the gym or outside.  Students would pick which activities or sports they would like to participate in.9:45–10:00 Nutrition break/health seminars10:00–11:00 Direct instruction (class) - This would be class time where teacher would be teaching specific items to students.  Content specific skills or ideas that they need to know about in order to proceed with their project.   Student’s classes would be organized based on # of students.11:00–12:00 Direct instruction (seminar) - Break out into small groups where students would be grouped according to interests. Specific skills may need to be taught. Students and teachers may request time to offer direct assistance with specific parts of their project.12:00 12:45 Lunch12:45– 3:00 Project work - After a phasing in time period.  Students would be spending time researching and applying knowledge to complete projects. Some time would be outside the school where connections to real life would me made. This session could be a time to work on solutions, ask questions, consult with teachers, ask experts and apply knowledge. As you can see this timetable offers lots of flexiblility and a whole bunch of freedom to explore. As with many new ideas we need to phase this in. As a grade 8 or 9 student starting this for the first time, this freedom to learning will need to be phased in and taught how to use their time for productive learning.
  • We have been receiving several calls from parents asking about what a typical day would look like at the NLC.  One big advantage of this program will be the integrated approach to the curriculum.  The whole grade 8 or grade 9 learning outcomes will be identified.  Over the course of a year students would be covering the entire grade curriculum. The curriculum would be covered through practice and application in their project work. A typical day could look like this:8:45-9:00 Connect time - class connection time with teacher9:00–9:45 Physical activity - in the gym or outside.  Students would pick which activities or sports they would like to participate in.9:45–10:00 Nutrition break/health seminars10:00–11:00 Direct instruction (class) - This would be class time where teacher would be teaching specific items to students.  Content specific skills or ideas that they need to know about in order to proceed with their project.   Student’s classes would be organized based on # of students.11:00–12:00 Direct instruction (seminar) - Break out into small groups where students would be grouped according to interests. Specific skills may need to be taught. Students and teachers may request time to offer direct assistance with specific parts of their project.12:00 12:45 Lunch12:45– 3:00 Project work - After a phasing in time period.  Students would be spending time researching and applying knowledge to complete projects. Some time would be outside the school where connections to real life would me made. This session could be a time to work on solutions, ask questions, consult with teachers, ask experts and apply knowledge. As you can see this timetable offers lots of flexiblility and a whole bunch of freedom to explore. As with many new ideas we need to phase this in. As a grade 8 or 9 student starting this for the first time, this freedom to learning will need to be phased in and taught how to use their time for productive learning.
  • Parent night presentation

    1. 1. Northern Learning CentreParent Information Night January 19th, 2012
    2. 2. u
    3. 3. Northern Learning Center What’s Different?• Learner• School/Classroom• Curriculum
    4. 4. 21st Century ….21st Century Foundational Skills3 Rs and 7 Cs•Reading •Critical thinking and problem solving•Writing •Creativity and innovation•Numeracy •Collaboration, teamwork and leadership •Cross-cultural understanding •Communications, Computing and ICT literacy •Career and learning self-reliance •Caring for personal health and planet earth
    5. 5. 21st EducationIt is flexible, creative, challenging, and complex. It addresses a rapidly changing world filled with fantastic new problems as well as exciting new possibilities. (www.21stcenturyschools.com)
    6. 6. Personalized Learning• Student centered learning that’s focused on the needs, strengths and aspirations of each individual young person• Student will play an active role in designing their own education and will be increasingly accountable for their own learning success
    7. 7. Towards 21st Century….So Far…• Different assessment (no letter grades, point system, feedback only)• Textbook questions are different, more problem solving questions and application questions• Research is done with technology – Want to know something- we it
    8. 8. • Students demonstrate learning in multiple ways (projects, presentations etc)• Mathematics-use of manipulatives, and problem solving, there is more than one right answer• Diverse classrooms with diverse learners – We know that not all students learn the same way
    9. 9. Learner’s Today…“Educators of today understand that when students are provided with rich learning experiences and opportunities to explore areas of interest, they learn better. When they are given tools to solve problems and encouraged to think creatively, they’re ultimately better equipped to make useful connections with the real world” – Together for Learning: School Libraries and the Emergence of the Learning Commons (Ontario School Library Association)
    10. 10. Learner’s Today…• Growing up in a media-saturated environment; information and ideas are accessed and shared in extremely visual, multi-media formats• Expect to have access to electronic information quickly and easily-most have never known a world where this wasn’t possible• Embrace new technologies readily and transfer their skill with one technology to each new technology• Multitask – Together for Learning: School Libraries and the Emergence of the Learning Commons (Ontario School Library Association)
    11. 11. What has not changed…The structure of school learning was built more than a century before digital communication was developed, and since then the structure has not changed significantly. – Together for Learning: School Libraries and the Emergence of the Learning Commons (Ontario School Library Association)
    12. 12. Schools…• embed learning that is aimed at engaging students in addressing real-world problems, issues important to humanity and questions that matter• “Will go from “buildings” to “nerve centres” with walls that are porous and transparent, connecting teachers, students, parents and the community to the wealth of knowledge that exists in the world”. What is 21st Century Education? (http://www.21centuryschools.com)
    13. 13. Northern Learning Centre Vision• To engage learners through a personal learning choice program. Where real life connection to student learning matters! Mission• To ensure each student is ready for the 21st Century with the skills, attitudes, experiences and mindsets to be successful. Values• Promote creativity and innovation• Practice collaboration, teamwork, leadership• Foster cross cultural understanding• Develop communication and media literacy• Ongoing career learning – self reliance• Promote a lifestyle of caring for personal health
    14. 14. Curriculum is not differentThe students will be learning the curriculum as prescribed in the Ministry of Education’s IRPs for each grade and course
    15. 15. The way students will learn the curriculum will look different• Recognition that some information will need to be directly taught• teachers will have the ability to “embed foundational knowledge acquisition and basic skill development within a more meaningful context and/or authentic task” – Bruce Beairsto, Engagement in Learning: Finding the Depth Beyond Diligence
    16. 16. “As we increasingly move toward an environment of instant and infinite information, it becomes less important for students to know, memorize or recall information, and more important for them to be able to find, sort, analyze, share, discuss, critique and create information. They need to move from being not just knowledgeable to knowledge-able” Michael Wesch, 2008 , A portal to media literacy.
    17. 17. Engagement“Increased engagement cannot be imposed through something a teacher does to, or even for, a student. It is only achieved when there is a partnership with the student, and between students, so that learning is co- constructed” Bruce Beairsto, (based on the work of The Critical Thinking Consortium)
    18. 18. Project Based Learning"a growing body of academic research supports the use of project-based learning in schools as a way to engage students, cut absenteeism, boost cooperative learning skills, and improve test scores. Those benefits are enhanced when technology is used in a meaningful way in the projects.“ • http://www.bie.org/research/study/studies_validate_project- based_learning_edutopia_2001
    19. 19. Project Based Learning• Projects – a summative activity generally done to show what the student has learned• Project Based Learning – to learn the curriculum by actively participating in project work
    20. 20. Project Based Learning (PBL)• process of inquiry in response to a complex question, problem, or challenge.• allows for students to engage and own their learning by giving them some choice – “rigorous projects are carefully planned, managed, and assessed to help students learn key academic content, practice 21st Century Skills (such as collaboration, communication & critical thinking), and create high-quality, authentic products & presentations”. • http://www.bie.org/about/what_is_pbl
    21. 21. Why use PBL?• Students gain a deeper understanding of the key concepts as they construct their own learning• Projects can build workplace skills and lifelong learning.• Projects can allow students “to address community issues, explore careers, interact with adult mentors, use technology, and present their work to audiences beyond the classroom”.• PBL can motivate students who might otherwise find school boring or meaningless.• http://www.bie.org/about/what_is_pbl
    22. 22. Math 8• demonstrate an understanding of perfect squares and square roots, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically (limited to whole numbers• determine the approximate square root of numbers that are not perfect squares (limited to whole numbers)• demonstrate an understanding of percents greater than or equal to 0%• demonstrate an understanding of ratio and rate• solve problems that involve rates, ratios, and proportional reasoning• demonstrate an understanding of multiplying and dividing positive fractions and mixed numbers, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically• demonstrate an understanding of multiplication and division of integers, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically• graph and analyse two-variable linear relations• model and solve problems using linear equations of the form: - ax = b - x/a = b, a =/= 0 -ax + b = c - x/a +b = c, a =/= 0 - a(x + b) = c – concretely, pictorially, and symbolically, where a, b, and c are integers• develop and apply the Pythagorean theorem to solve problems• draw and construct nets for 3-D objects• determine the surface area of• - right rectangular prisms• - right triangular prisms• - right cylinders to solve problems• develop and apply formulas for determining the volume of right prisms and right cylinders• draw and interpret top, front, and side views of 3-D objects composed of right rectangular prisms• demonstrate an understanding of tessellation by• - explaining the properties of shapes that make tessellating possible• - creating tessellations• - identifying tessellations in the environment• critique ways in which data is presented• solve problems involving the probability of independent events
    23. 23. Science 8• demonstrate safe procedures• perform experiments using the scientific method• represent and interpret information in graphic form• use models to explain how systems operate• demonstrate scientific literacy• demonstrate ethical, responsible, cooperative behaviour• describe the relationship between scientific principles and technology• demonstrate competence in the use of technologies specific to investigative procedures and research• demonstrate knowledge of the characteristics of living things• relate the main features and properties of cells to their functions• explain the relationship between cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems• explain the functioning of the immune system, and the roles of the primary, secondary, and tertiary defence systems• demonstrate knowledge of the behaviour of waves• explain the properties of visible light• compare visible light to other types of electromagnetic radiation• explain how human vision works• explain the concept of force• describe the relationship between solids, liquids, and gases, using the kinetic molecular theory• determine the density of various substances• explain the relationship between pressure, temperature, area, and force in fluids• recognize similarities between natural and constructed fluid systems (e.g., hydraulic, pneumatic)• explain the significance of salinity and temperature in the world’s oceans• describe how water and ice shape the landscape• describe factors that affect productivity and species distribution in aquatic environments
    24. 24. Social Studies 8 – History 500AD to 1600AD• assess a variety of positions on controversial issues• co-operatively plan and implement a course of action that addresses the problem, issue, or inquiry initially identified• gather and organize a body of information from primary and secondary print and non-print sources, including electronic sources• identify and clarify a problem, an issue, or an inquiry• interpret and evaluate a variety of primary and secondary sources• plan, revise, and deliver written and oral presentations• compare daily life, family structures, and gender roles in a variety of civilizations• demonstrate awareness of artistic expression as a reflection of the culture in which it is produced• describe a variety of diverse cultural traditions and world religions• describe how societies preserve identity, transmit culture, and adapt to change• identify factors that influence the development and decline of world civilizations• identify periods of significant cultural achievement, including the Renaissance• assess the impact of contact, conflict, and conquest on civilizations• demonstrate understanding of the tension between individual rights and the responsibilities of citizens in a variety of civilizations• describe various ways individuals and groups can influence legal systems and political structures• explain the development and importance of government systems• analyse the effect of commerce on trade routes, settlement patterns, and cultural exchanges• compare basic economic systems and different forms of exchange• compare the changing nature of labour in rural and urban environments• describe the impact of technological innovation and science on political, social, and economic structures• analyse how people interacted with and altered their environments, in terms of – population – settlement patterns – resource use – cultural development• construct, interpret, and use graphs, tables, grids, scales, legends, and various types of maps• describe how physical geography influenced patterns of settlement, trade, and exploration• locate and describe current and historical events on maps• locate and describe major world landforms, bodies of water, and political boundaries on maps
    25. 25. • English 8 interact and collaborate in pairs and groups to – support the learning of self and others – explore experiences, ideas, and information – understand the perspectives of others – comprehend and respond to a variety of texts – create a variety of texts• express ideas and information in a variety of situations and forms to – explore and respond – recall and describe – narrate and explain – persuade and support – engage and entertain• listen to comprehend, interpret, and evaluate ideas and information from a variety of texts, considering – purpose – messages – tone – structure – effects and impact – bias• select and use a range of strategies to interact and collaborate with others in pairs and groups, including – selecting methods for working together effectively – listening actively – contributing ideas and recognizing the ideas of others – demonstrating awareness of diverse points of view – reaching consensus or agreeing to differ• select and use a range of strategies to prepare oral communications, including – interpreting a task and setting a purpose – considering audience – generating ideas – making connections among relevant knowledge and experiences – planning and rehearsing presentations• select and use a range of strategies to express ideas and information in oral communications, including – vocal techniques – style and tone – nonverbal techniques – visual aids – organizational and memory aids – monitoring methods• use listening strategies to understand, recall, and analyse a variety of texts, including – connecting to prior knowledge – making reasonable predictions – identifying main points – generating thoughtful questions – clarifying and confirming meaning• speak and listen to make personal responses to texts, by – making connections with prior knowledge and experiences – describing reactions and emotions – generating thoughtful questions – developing opinions with reasons• speak and listen to interpret and analyse ideas and information from texts, by – examining and comparing ideas and elements within and among texts – identifying perspectives – identifying bias and contradictions• speak and listen to synthesize and extend thinking, by – personalizing ideas and information – explaining relationships among ideas and information – applying new ideas and information – transforming existing ideas and information• use metacognitive strategies to reflect on and assess their speaking and listening, by – referring to criteria – setting goals for improvement – creating a plan for achieving goals – evaluating progress and setting new goals• recognize and apply the structures and features of oral language to convey and derive meaning, including – context – text structures – syntax – diction – usage conventions – rhetorical devices – vocal techniques – nonverbal techniques• read, both collaboratively and independently, to comprehend a variety of literary texts, including – literature reflecting a variety of times, places, and perspectives – literature reflecting a variety of prose forms – poetry in a variety of narrative and lyric forms – significant works of Canadian literature (e.g., the study of plays, short stories, poetry, or novels) – traditional forms from Aboriginal and other cultures – student-generated material• write meaningful personal texts that explore ideas and information to – experiment – express self – make connections – reflect and respond – remember and recall• read, both collaboratively and independently, to comprehend a variety of information and persuasive texts with some complexity of ideas and form, such as – articles and reports – biographies and autobiographies – textbooks, magazines, and newspapers – print and electronic reference material – advertising and promotional material – opinion-based material – student-generated material• write purposeful information texts that express ideas and information to – explore and respond – record and describe – analyse and explain – persuade – engage• view, both collaboratively and independently, to comprehend a variety of visual texts, such as – broadcast media – web sites – graphic novels – film and video – photographs – art – visual components of print media – student-generated material• write effective imaginative texts to explore ideas and information to – make connections and develop insights – explore literary forms and techniques – experiment with language and style – engage and entertain
    26. 26. English 8• create thoughtful representations that communicate ideas and information to – explore and respond – record and describe – explain and persuade – engage• independently select and read, for sustained periods of time, texts for enjoyment and to increase fluency• before reading and viewing, select and use a range of strategies to anticipate content and construct meaning, including – interpreting a task – setting a purpose – accessing prior knowledge – making logical predictions – generating guiding questions• select and use a range of strategies to generate, develop, and organize ideas for writing and representing, including – making connections – setting a purpose and considering audience – gathering and summarizing ideas from personal interest, knowledge, and inquiry – analysing writing samples or models – setting class-generated criteria• during reading and viewing, select and use a range of strategies to construct, monitor, and confirm meaning, including – predicting, questioning, visualizing, and making connections – making inferences and drawing conclusions – differentiating main ideas and supporting details – summarizing – using text features – determining the meaning of unknown words and phrases – self-monitoring and self-correcting• select and use a range of drafting and composing strategies while writing and representing, including – using a variety of sources to collect ideas and information – generating text – organizing ideas and information – analysing writing samples or models – creating and consulting criteria• select and use a range of strategies to revise, edit, and publish writing and representing, including – checking work against established criteria – enhancing supporting details and examples – refining specific aspects and features of text – proofreading• after reading and viewing, select and use a range of strategies to extend and confirm meaning, including – responding to text – asking questions – reviewing text and purpose for reading – making inferences and drawing conclusions – summarizing, synthesizing, and applying ideas• explain and support personal responses to texts, by – making connections with prior knowledge and experiences – describing reactions and emotions – generating thoughtful questions – developing opinions using evidence• write and represent to explain and support personal responses to texts, by – making connections with prior knowledge and experiences – describing reactions and emotions – generating thoughtful questions – developing opinions using evidence• interpret and analyse ideas and information from texts, by – making and supporting judgments – examining and comparing ideas and elements within and among texts – identifying points of view – identifying bias and contradictions• write and represent to interpret and analyse ideas and information from texts, by – making and supporting judgments – examining and comparing ideas and elements within and among texts – identifying points of view – identifying bias and contradictions• write and represent to synthesize and extend thinking, by – personalizing ideas and information – explaining relationships among ideas and information – applying new ideas and information – transforming existing ideas and information• synthesize and extend thinking about texts, by – personalizing ideas and information – explaining relationships among ideas and information – applying new ideas and information – transforming existing ideas and information• use metacognitive strategies to reflect on and assess their reading and viewing, by – referring to criteria – setting goals for improvement – creating a plan for achieving goals – evaluating progress and setting new goals• use metacognitive strategies to reflect on and assess their writing and representing, by – relating their work to criteria – setting goals for improvement – creating a plan for achieving goals – evaluating progress and setting new goals
    27. 27. English 8• recognize and explain how structures and features of text shape readers’ and viewers’ construction of meaning, including – form and genre – functions of text – literary elements – literary devices – use of language – non-fiction elements – visual/artistic devices• use and experiment with elements of style in writing and representing, appropriate to purpose and audience, to enhance meaning and artistry, including – syntax and sentence fluency – diction – point of view – literary devices – visual/artistic devices• demonstrate increasing word skills and vocabulary knowledge, by – analysing the origins and roots of words – determining meanings and uses of words based on context – using vocabulary appropriate to audience and purpose• use and experiment with elements of form in writing and representing, appropriate to purpose and audience, to enhance meaning and artistry, including – organization of ideas and information – text features and visual/artistic devices• demonstrate an understanding of a variety of economic, social, and emotional issues and challenges that may affect adults at different stages of life use conventions in writing and representing, appropriate to purpose and audience, to enhance meaning and artistry, including – grammar and usage – punctuation, capitalization, and Canadian spelling – copyright and citation of references – presentation/layout
    28. 28. Now
    29. 29. NowProject Learning Integrated Science in the use of technologies specific to demonstrate knowledge of the characteristics of living things relate the main features and properties of cells to their functions explain the relationship between cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems explain the functioning of the immune system, and the roles of the demonstrate knowledge of the behaviour of waves explain the properties of visible light compare visible light to other types of electromagnetic radiation explain how human vision works explain the concept of force describe the relationship between solids, liquids, and determine the density of various substances describe how water and ice shape the landscape describe factors that affect productivity and species
    30. 30. Now
    31. 31. Eye Spy – Integrated project• explain how human vision works• demonstrate safe procedures• perform experiments using the scientific method• represent and interpret information in graphic form• demonstrate scientific literacy• demonstrate ethical, responsible, cooperative behaviour• demonstrate competence in the use of technologies specific to investigative procedures and research• co-operatively plan and implement a course of action that addresses the problem,• issue, or inquiry initially identified• gather and organize a body of information from primary and secondary print and• non-print sources, including electronic sources• interpret and evaluate a variety of primary and secondary sources• plan, revise, and deliver written and oral presentations• demonstrate an understanding of ratio and rate• solve problems that involve rates, ratios, and proportional reasoning• demonstrate an understanding of multiplying and dividing positive fractions and mixed numbers, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically• demonstrate an understanding of multiplication and division of integers, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically• graph and analyse two-variable linear relations
    32. 32. Eye Spy – Integrated project• interact and collaborate in pairs and groups to – support the learning of self and others – explore experiences, ideas, and information – understand the perspectives of others – comprehend and respond to a variety of texts – create a variety of texts• before reading and viewing, select and use a range of strategies to anticipate content and construct meaning, including – interpreting a task – setting a purpose – accessing prior knowledge – making logical predictions – generating guiding questions• view, both collaboratively and independently, to comprehend a variety of visual texts, such as – broadcast media – web sites – graphic novels – film and video – photographs – art – visual components of print media – student-generated material• listen to comprehend, interpret, and evaluate ideas and information from a variety of texts, considering – purpose – messages – tone – structure – effects and impact – bias• express ideas and information in a variety of situations and forms to – explore and respond – recall and describe – narrate and explain – persuade and support – engage and entertain• write purposeful information texts that express ideas and information to – explore and respond – record and describe – analyse and explain – persuade – engage• create thoughtful representations that communicate ideas and information to – explore and respond – record and describe – explain and persuade – engage
    33. 33. Northern Learning Centre• Choice program• Project based personalized learning with a focus on 21st Century skills• Grade 8 & 9 students- to start - vertically (grades 10,11 & 12...)• Applied learning where teachers & students pull out Prescribed Learning Outcomes• Digital world–reporting, PLOs and portfolios – meeting students in their world• All students needing a digital device. (laptop, net-book, tablet, or smart phone)• Approximately 1 to 25 ratio – hopefully a cohort of 50-100
    34. 34. Northern Learning Centre 8:45-9:00 Connect time 9:00–9:45 Physical activity or PE 9:45–10:00 Nutrition break 10:00–11:00 Direct instruction (class or seminar) 11:00–12:00 Direct instruction (class or seminar) 12:00 12:45 Lunch 12:45– 3:00 Project workOther days more instruction – if needed
    35. 35. Northern Learning Centre• What about electives? – Goal is to hire teachers with that experience – If not – plan to put students in electives – Integrate electives with projects• Gradual Release
    36. 36. Program Location
    37. 37. I am interested what next?• Check out our website at krss.sd57.bc.ca• See the NLC blog for more info• Apply by Feb 3rd• Wait to hear back on or before Feb 17th• If accepted follow transfer process – we will explain
    38. 38. Criteria1. a completed application,2. a laptop computer or other tablet like device, (assistance is available to those students that are unable to afford their own)3. Looking for best fit based on grade level, interests, maturity, and their ability to show interests.The school will have a committee that will go through the applications.
    39. 39. Questions
    40. 40. I am interested what next?• Check out our website at krss.sd57.bc.ca• See the NLC blog for more info• Apply by Feb 3rd• Wait to hear back on or before Feb 17th• If accepted follow transfer process – we will explain

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