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Presentation for wattle wednesday

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  • In this presentation, I will give you the background to our work in terms of who we are and our motivation for undertaking this project. I will introduce the process and product that we have developed to support translating learning outcomes in Moodle and then give a live demonstration of these.
  • Who we each are, our support role in the College.Srinivas- Educational Technologist employed by the Online Environment Support Group, working in CECS as a Wattle Support PersonLauren- Educational Developer working in the FLU to provide advice and support on educational design and development of Wattle sitesLynette- Academic in SoCS with a research interest in curriculum development processes.
  • Within Australian Universities, the alignment of what happens within a course against learning outcomes or graduate attributes is becoming widespread, even standard practice. Bigg’s (1996) idea of constructive alignment is probably the most common, currently used concept.
  • Constructive alignment puts the learning at the centre of the course design. We start by defining the intended learning outcomes, set up appropriate learning activities to produce these and then test these with aligned assessment.You can see on the diagram that students are guided by the Intended learning outcomes and the assessment items. Students use this information to approach their learning in each course. If the learning activities are in line with these, then it should improve the quality of learning and in turn our graduates. AdvantagesIt encourages clarity in the design of the curriculum, and transparency in the links between learning and assessment. Alignment is about getting students to take responsibility for their own learning, as the teacher creates an environment which is encouraging and supportive of students engaging in the appropriate and necessary mental activity to meet the desired outcomes.In a truly Constructively Aligned curriculum it facilitates deep learning as the activities are designed for the purpose.
  • The Flexible Learning Unit has been supporting staff to move towards such a Education Design Process based Biggs’ Constructive Alignment theory. Through supporting staff in this outcomes based approach, we have identified that it is generally quite difficult to translate learning outcomes into an effective course design using tools provided by an LMS, in particular Moodle. This difficulty in mapping outcomes to activities and resources in Moodle is largely compounded by the difference between the language of learning outcomes and that used by the LMS.
  • We've identified the need for a process that provides a link between the pedagogy and the implementation in Moodle. To do this we have formed such a process and developed self-guided online instruments that helps teachers link Moodle activities to learning outcomes.
  • A Process for Implementing Learning Outcomes in MoodleSelect an outcome for the courseThe process assumes the course design has been determinedIdentify the characteristics of the outcome.This is where the teacher considers the outcome in terms of the course, program, discipline and readiness of the learnersUse the online instrumentTo identify the relevant Moodle activity or resourceDevelop the Moodle activity or resource in the courseWill show an example of the process from start to finish in a moment, first I will introduce the Online Instruments
  • We have created flowcharts and online lessons that address the outcomes:Developing communicationDeveloping collaboration and teamworkThe reason these are online self-guided tools is to support staff who have limited time to investigate Moodle activities. Most of you know what you want to achieve and just want to know how to do it, without trawling through all of the documentation. Flowcharts are:................
  • Flowchart 1- develop teamwork through collaboration
  • Flowchart 2- Develop communication skills and interaction
  • Online lessons............
  • Communication Lesson screenshotFollow the links presented at the bottom of the page, to the end point that suggests a tool(s) to use and gives you an example, links to more info and step-by-step guide on how to develop it.
  • Collaboration Lesson screenshot
  • The Course
  • First step in the process is to Select an Outcome.
  • After examining the course outcomes and other criteria for this course, we have selected to focus on developing the ability to function effectively in a team as it is repeated several times in slightly different ways.
  • Step 2 is to identify the characteristicsThe course outlines professional Engineering tasks (project management, managing information and documentation) that students need to learn. The course outcomes refer to functioning effectively in a team and working with peers. We can facilitate this outcome with the course characteristics in mind by creating a learning activity where students collaboratively undertake small scale Professional tasks, for example creating a reference list to manage the information in their project.
  • So what tool will they use to do this in Moodle.......(next slide)
  • ....And how do we develop this?For these last 2 steps, I will go to the Online Instrument.
  • Collaboration FlowchartCreate a reference listDatabaseShow link in Wattle Workflow eBook
  • In the near future, we hope to develop further online instruments that develop outcomes such as reflection and peer assessment skills. We encourage you to utilise the online instruments to inform your course design and welcome any feedback on how we can improve the functionality of these.

Presentation for wattle wednesday Presentation for wattle wednesday Presentation Transcript

  • Translating Learning Outcomes in Moodle
    SrinivasChemboli
    Lauren Kane
    Lynette Johns-Boast
  • About Us
    Srinivas Chemboli is a PhD student in the ANU School of Computer Science, researching effective capture and reuse of intellectual effort in scientific workflows. He is also an Educational Technologist in the Online Environment Support Group (OESG) in the Division of Information at the ANU.
    Lauren Kane is an Educational Developer working in the Flexible Learning Unit at the ANU College of Engineering and Computer Science. Lauren provides advice and support to teaching staff on educational design, structuring course materials for pedagogically effective on-and-off campus delivery, and the appropriate use of educational technologies.
    Lynette Johns-Boast is a lecturer in software engineering at the ANU College of Engineering and Computer Science.  She is currently developing a multi-disciplinary group project course for undergraduate students. Her current research is based around the idea of applying an approach which has recently emerged from the systems engineering world - Aspect Oriented Thinking - to curriculum development.
    This work is supported by The Australian National University and the Commonwealth of Australia through the Engineering Hubs and Spokes Project and the Cooperative Research Centre for Advanced Automotive Technology.
  • Motivation
    Houghton, Warren (2004) Engineering Subject Centre Guide: Learning and Teaching Theory for Engineering Academics. Loughborough: HEA Engineering Subject Centre.
  • Motivation
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  • Motivation
  • The Process
  • The Online Instruments
    Communication
    Collaboration
  • Flowcharts
  • The Online Instruments
    Communication
    Collaboration
  • Demonstration
    COMP3100: Software Engineering Group Project
    This course provides the student with project experience to complement the studies of the software development process in courses COMP2100, COMP2110, COMP3110 and COMP3120. Students work in small groups and participate in all the development phases (requirements analysis, design, construction, testing and documentation) of a nontrivial software system. As well, each group has to address the control of the development process by constructing and following a detailed software development management plan.
    Course Study Guide: https://cecs.anu.edu.au/studentdb/courses/students/overview_student.cgi?Course_Code=COMP3100
  • Demonstration
  • Demonstration
  • Demonstration
  • Demonstration
  • Demonstration
    CECS Education Hub
    MoodleMoot 2010 Site
  • Thank-you