Everything You Wanted to Know about  Sight Glass Lighting
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Everything You Wanted to Know about Sight Glass Lighting

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Comprehensive presentation on the different types of lighting technology used with sight glasses. It compares LED, halogen, and other styles of sight glass lighting.

Comprehensive presentation on the different types of lighting technology used with sight glasses. It compares LED, halogen, and other styles of sight glass lighting.

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  • 1. o Types, Benefits, Uses o Latest Lighting Technologies o The Perfect Lighting Solution o Ratings and Approvals Everything You Want to Know About Lighting and More!
  • 2. This Lighting Presentation includes: • Halogen lights • LED Lights • Other lighting technologies • Ratings and approvals • Selecting the appropriate light • New lights
  • 3. Halogen Lighting
  • 4. Measurement of Light • Lumens • Measurement of light in all directions - best used for incandescent bulbs • Not an effective measurement of reflected Light • Foot-Candles (candela) measures light at a distance from the bulb
  • 5. Measurement of Light • Lux another effective unit of measurement of reflective light • Foot-candles can be converted to lux by the following formula: Foot-Candles ÷ 0.0929 = Lux • Generally speaking, foot-candles and lux are inversely proportional to the distance squared • Example, a lux of 200 at a distance of 5 ft. from a bulb is 50 lux at a distance of 10 ft. • If the distance is doubled the lux is reduced to ¼ of the original lux
  • 6. Maximizing Light Output • Filament must be at focal point of reflector to maximize light • Intention is to have all light directed in a parallel manner (Figure A)
  • 7. Maximizing Light Output • Some light will be direct and angled (see Figure B) • A typical angle of reflection for a spot is 10º
  • 8. Flood Light • Flood lighting is often desirable but will compromise efficiency • Three ways to produce wider angle (30–35º) 1. Moving filament away from reflector’s focal point 2. Reflecting at angles other than parallel (Figure C) 3. More direct light (angled) will be generated
  • 9. Flood Light • Reflector designed slightly different than parabolic shape • Light reflecting at different angles (Figure D) • Dimpled glass lens usually in encapsulated bulb • A common example is an outdoor floodlight
  • 10. Voltage vs. Intensity 24V light produces more output than 120 or 230V • Basic power formula: Voltage × Amperage = Wattage • As voltage increases and wattage remains the same, amperage must be reduced • Amperage is inversely proportional to the voltage (if wattage remains constant)
  • 11. Voltage vs. Intensity • As a result, the higher the voltage the more resistance is needed • Higher voltage requires a longer, thinner filament – bad for reflecting • 24V shorter, thicker filament has two benefits 1. A thicker filament can burn hotter and produces a brighter, whiter light 2. A shorter filament produces more light at the reflector’s focal point, resulting in more efficient reflections
  • 12. Light vs. Heat • Typical halogen bulb produces 15% light and 85% heat which comes from invisible IR • There are 3 ways to reduce the IR light (or heat) from a light source…
  • 13. Light vs. Heat First Way to reduce the IR light from a light source 1. Cool beam bulb • Allows IR light to pass through reflector • Not 100% effective as non-reflected (direct) light has IR
  • 14. Light vs. Heat Second Way to reduce the IR light from a light source 2. IR mirror • Placed opposite reflector, reflects the IR back • Only allows visible light to pass through
  • 15. Light vs. Heat Third Way to reduce the IR light from a light source 3. IR filter • Placed opposite reflector, absorbs IR • Allows visible light to pass
  • 16. Halogen Bulb Types
  • 17. LED Lighting (Light Emitting Diodes)
  • 18. LED Background • Thomas Edison demonstrated first incandescent in 1879 • Past 40 years LED was used in niche applications • Red light was only effective option • First calculators and watches • Then signs and traffic signals • Benefits: Improved brightness, increased applications
  • 19. LED Advantages • Long service life (5 years and improving) • Shock and vibration resistant • Smaller • Cold light output • Energy efficient (low operating costs – green technology)
  • 20. LED Advantages • Generate directional light • Easy to control color output • Can remove potentially harmful or unwanted radiation, such as ultraviolet or infra-red light • No maintenance
  • 21. LED Future • Energy savings • 20% electricity generated is used for lighting • LEDs could cut that amount in half • Save billions of dollars in electricity bills • Significantly reduce energy demand, environmental pollution and greenhouse-gas emissions • Gov’t funding to triple efficiency of white LEDs by 2025 • The days of the incandescent bulb are numbered
  • 22. LED Comparison LED Cool Light Halogen and Incandescent Lighting Heat Generation 5% of energy consumed to heat generation 85% of energy consumed to heat generation Efficiency 55.6 lumens per watt 10 lumens per watt Color Temperature 4800 - 6300 K temperature, approximates daylight, provides greater ground definition and less eye fatigue 2800 K Temperature approximates dusk and causes eye fatigue Usable Pattern Emits a directional light source that can efficiently be captured and translated into the operational field Emits a spherical light source that is very difficult to capture to the operational field Life Filament free design Filament design that when subjected to shock and vibration causes damage and shortens bulb life (instant expiration) Value Lower maintenance costs, better warranty coverage, lower power consumption, and longer life. Routine maintenance, standard warranty, high power consumption, and shorter life.
  • 23. Other Lighting Technologies
  • 24. Lighting Alternatives • Metal Halides (HID) • Cool burning • Consumes less power • Lasts around 10,000 hours • Produces more light at higher color temperature • Requires a ballast • Available in ESL37, ESL39 and USL07 lights
  • 25. Lighting Alternatives • Compact Fluorescent Lights (CFL) • Requires proper disposal (mercury) • Lasts around 10,000 hours • 20-25% of energy cost compared to halogen • Difficult to reflect – not good for process vessel lighting
  • 26. Rating and Approvals
  • 27. NEMA and IP Ratings
  • 28. • North America Class System • Separated into 3 based on explosive characteristics • Further separated into Divisions or Zones • Division has two levels, Zone has three levels Explosion Proof Ratings
  • 29. • Class I level of hazard depends on frequency of occurrence • Longer the material is present, the greater the risk Explosion Proof Ratings
  • 30. • Class I Groups based on explosive properties • North America has four Groups • Cenelec uses three Groups Explosion Proof Ratings
  • 31. Temperature Classes • Ignition temperature is the minimum temperature of a surface at which a explosive atmosphere ignites • Max temp of equipment must be lower than ignition temp • See chart on next page… Explosion Proof Ratings
  • 32. Explosion Proof Ratings
  • 33. NEMA Requirements for Hazardous Locations Explosion Proof Ratings
  • 34. Light Selection
  • 35. • Size (for appropriate port and height restrictions) • Weight (topple over vessel) • Voltage (Customer’s availability) • Wattage (appropriate for application) • Light Pattern (flood vs. spot) Lighting Considerations
  • 36. • Housing Material (Aluminum or stainless - corrosive atmospheres) • Heat output (heat sensitive media) • Atmospheric conditions (wet locations, i.e. hose down) • Location requirements (i.e. hazardous) • Inaccessible area (minimize maintenance) • Required on time (continuous vs. intermittent) Lighting Considerations
  • 37. Light Intensity Requirement • Factors to Consider • Vessel Depth • Vessel Characteristics • Reflection (polished) • Absorption (lined) • Required viewing area • Full or empty • Wide or narrow • Objects being viewed • Foam • Level • Residue
  • 38. Light Selection Chart
  • 39. Light Selection Chart
  • 40. Light Distribution Chart USL06-EX 24/50 Flood
  • 41. Mounting Lights • Light and View Combination • Half-moon type (Lumistar) • Bracket mount • Fiber optic • Direct light mounts • Sanitary, flanged, welded • Bracket, MetaClamp, adapter, etc.
  • 42. Mounting Lights • Onto existing sight ports (i.e. cover flange) with bracket • Visual flow indicators (bracket) • At distance from sight port (fiber optic) • Mount on side of vessel • Away from hose down area • Inside control panel • Special mounting – if possible, we can do it
  • 43. Application Selection Form Data Sheet No. 02-0118
  • 44. Lighting Options • Lights are available in different sizes, volts and watts • Designed for hazardous locations • For very small areas (fiber optics) • Available accessories • Momentary and permanent on/off switches (internal and remote) • Timers (internal and remote) • Cameras for remote viewing
  • 45. New Lights
  • 46. • USL08LF (Lumiflex) Fiberoptic Light • Flexible Fiber Bundle • Approvals • UL 844 • Class I, Div 1&2, Groups C&D • Power Source: 120Volt • Lamp: 39 Watt Fiber Optic Bulb • Options • Mounts to Sanitary MetaClamp • Remote Timer Explosion Proof Luminaires
  • 47. Light Distribution Chart Competitor comparison
  • 48. E/USL 55-EX • Fit and Forget (Up To 50,000 Hours) • Stainless (ESL) or Aluminum (ASL) Construction • Durable – Impact and Vibration Resistant • Low Heat Output • Power Source: 12, 24, 120 & 230 Volt • Low Power Consumption • Options: • Sanitary or Bracket Mount • Momentary Switch • Continuous Use Feature Explosion Proof Luminaires
  • 49. Series USL16/36-LED • Fit and Forget (Up To 50,000 Hours) • All Stainless Steel Construction • Durable – Impact and Vibration Resistant • Cold Light Output • Power Source: 24 or 120 Volt • Low Power Consumption • Options • Sanitary or Bracket Mount • Momentary Switch • Continuous Use Feature Non-Explosion Proof Luminaires
  • 50. Series FLBP (Cordless) • Compact Design (Smallest) • All Stainless Steel Construction • Power Source: Batteries • Lamp: LED • On/Off Switch • Available with Sanitary Connection • For Portable Vessels Non-Explosion Proof Luminaires
  • 51. Series Lumi-View33 • Combination Light/Sight Glass Lighting Port • All Stainless Steel Construction • Mounts to Most Existing Sight Ports • Low Heat Output • Power Source: 24 Volt • Lamp: 5 Watt LED • View/Light 1” view and greater Non-Explosion Proof Luminaires
  • 52. Series ESL39-HID (Metal Halide) • Most Powerful Light • Stainless Steel Construction • Power Source: 24 or 120 Volt • Lamp: 35 or 70 Watt HID • HID High Power ⇒ 300W Halogen • Low Heat Output • One Year Continuous Use (10,000 hrs.) • Options • Wide Angle Distribution • Sanitary Connection Non-Explosion Proof Luminaires
  • 53. Series ESL39-HID (Metal Halide) • Most Powerful Light • Stainless Steel Construction • Power Source: 24 or 120 Volt • Lamp: 35 or 70 Watt HID • HID High Power ⇒ 300W Halogen • Low Heat Output • One Year Continuous Use (10,000 hrs.) • Options • Wide Angle Distribution • Sanitary Connection Non-Explosion Proof Luminaires
  • 54. Click to enter your contact information and receive a FREE White Paper “How to Spec Lighting for Sight Glass Lighting Application” Free Sight Glass Lighting Resource
  • 55. • For More Information • Visit L.J. Star Incorporated for more information on Site Glass Lighting L.J. Star Inc. • Contact us directly: • Mailing Address: L.J. Star Incorporated P.O. Box 1116 Twinsburg, OH 44087 • Telephone: (330) 405-3040 FAX: (330) 405-3070 Lighting and Sight Glass Lighting