Migration 2

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Migration 2

  1. 1. Video Migration
  2. 2. Learning Objectives <ul><li>Recap examples of forced and voluntary migration; </li></ul><ul><li>Know key terminology; </li></ul><ul><li>Investigate case studies of forced and voluntary migration; </li></ul><ul><li>Be able to identify economic, environmental, social, political and cultural effects of these migrations. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Definitions <ul><li>Refugee – someone who flees from their country from conflict or natural disaster or because of a well-founded fear of persecution in grounds of religion, political views etc </li></ul><ul><li>Asylum seeker – a migrant who is seeking protection and can no longer live safely in their own country. </li></ul><ul><li>Asylum - the formal application by a refugee to reside in a country when they arrive in that country. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Definitions <ul><li>Displaced persons – have been forced to leave their homes, but unlike refugees remain in their own country e.g. during the war in former Yugoslavia. </li></ul><ul><li>Returnees – refugees who have returned to their own country, either voluntarily or through force. </li></ul><ul><li>Economic migrant – a person who moves into a country or region to seek employment or better employment or a higher standard of living. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Voluntary or forced migration? <ul><li>Palestinian Arabs forced from new Israel (1948) </li></ul><ul><li>Retired Brits to Devon and Spain </li></ul><ul><li>Ugandan Asians expelled by Idi Amin in 1970s </li></ul><ul><li>Rwandan war refugees into neighbouring countries </li></ul><ul><li>Polish workers into the UK </li></ul><ul><li>British doctors to USA </li></ul><ul><li>Refugees from Mozambique famine in 2000 </li></ul><ul><li>Mexicans to California </li></ul><ul><li>Eruption of Mount Soufriere, Montserrat, 1990s </li></ul><ul><li>Europeans into the Prairies in C19th </li></ul><ul><li>West Indians to Britain </li></ul><ul><li>Rural-urban migration of people into Brazil’s major cities </li></ul><ul><li>Jews forced out of Nazi Germany </li></ul>
  6. 6. Refugee migrations <ul><li>Refugees are people who flee their homes because of ‘well-founded fear of persecution for reasons of race, religion, nationality, political opinion or membership of a particular social group (UNHCR, 1951) </li></ul><ul><li>One person in every 120 in the world has been forced to flee their home as a result of war, violence or persecution. </li></ul><ul><li>22 million people worldwide are refugees or displaced persons. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Refugee migrations <ul><li>Comment and contrast on the patterns shown in Figures 9a and 9b . </li></ul><ul><li>Annotate the maps. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Exam Question: Asylum
  9. 9. Effects on population structure
  10. 10. Effects on population structure
  11. 11. Consequences of migration <ul><li>Migration affects 2 locations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>destination and origin </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Can have positive and negative effects </li></ul><ul><li>The effects can also be defined as social , political , economic , environmental and cultural . </li></ul>
  12. 12. Consequences of migration POSITIVE FOR HOST COUNTRY POSITIVE FOR COUNTRY OF ORIGIN NEGATIVE FOR HOST COUNTRY NEGATIVE FOR COUNTRY OF ORIGIN
  13. 13. Consequences of migration POSITIVE FOR HOST COUNTRY POSITIVE FOR COUNTRY OF ORIGIN NEGATIVE FOR HOST COUNTRY NEGATIVE FOR COUNTRY OF ORIGIN

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