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Why write a Research Question?
Why write a Research Question?
Why write a Research Question?
Why write a Research Question?
Why write a Research Question?
Why write a Research Question?
Why write a Research Question?
Why write a Research Question?
Why write a Research Question?
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Why write a Research Question?

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  • 1. Why write a  Research Question? A focused question provides structure to the search for information.   A well crafted research question helps avoid aimless searching & wasted time.
  • 2. Start with a general topic   Dogs Michigan Middle school students Then ask ...         What do I want to know about     this topic?
  • 3. Use "question words"
    • WHY
    • HOW
    • WHO
    • WHAT
    • WHERE
    • WHEN
  • 4. Four Types of Questions
    • Yes - No question - this type of question elicits a "yes" or a "no" answer. For example, if the question was "Do you work at Trenton Public Schools", you would all answer "yes." 
    •  
    •  
    • Inch question (also called the " hand " question for Kindergarten and First Grade students, and " recall " question for middle and high school students) - an inch question requires a one-word answer and generally little research. Usually the answer can be found in one source. Examples of a one-inch question are: "How many states make up the United States?" or How long is the Mississippi River?" 
  • 5. Four Types of Questions (Continued)
    • Foot question (also called the " elbow " question for Kindergarten and First Grade students, and " comprehension " question for middle and high school students) - a foot question requires students to read a passage, a page or several pages and come up with an answer to the question using their own words. Examples of a foot question are: "How did the original 13 colonies become the United States?" , "How was the Mississippi delta formed?"
  • 6. Four Types of Questions (Continued)
    • Yard question (also called the " arm " question for Kindergarten and First Grade students, and " synthesis " question for middle and high school students) - a yard question requires students to look for the answer in a variety of sources, synthesize that information, and draw their own conclusions. Examples of a yard question are: "How does Hawaii's location and climate affect its economy?" , "If George Washington had not been our first president, how might our history have been different?" 
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    •  
    • Complete lesson plan including the Four Types of Questions can be accessed at: http://www.kn.pacbell.com/wired/21stcent/lgener.html Developing Different Types of Questions was created by Sharon Sutton
  • 7. Four Types of Questions (Continued)
    • "Foot" - Comprehension 
    • &
    • "Yard" - Synthesis
    • Better choices 
    • for most Middle School & High School research projects.
    • Compelling research questions:
      • Allow students to be engaged & challenged
      • Involve higher level skills - organizing, reasoning, descernment, creativity, independence, etc.
  • 8. What makes a good research question?
      • Is it interesting? --- to you or others
    •  
      • Is it research-able? --- can information be found or generated to answer the question?
    •  
      • Is it significant? --- to you or others
    •  
      • Is it manageable? ---not too broad or too narrow
  • 9. Some examples:
    • Dogs
      • Which dog breeds make the best family pets?
      • What characteristics make good seeing-eye dogs?
      • How can I choose a puppy that will be a good hunting dog?
    • Michigan
      • Where are top vacation spots in Michigan and why do people visit them?
      • What are some alternative methods for funding public schools?
      • Who are three of the most significant people in Michigan's history?

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