Semicolon Usage<br />View this presentation to learn more about how to use semicolons, an awesome piece of punctuation. <b...
Let’s start by looking at why we might need a semicolon. <br />First, we will look at a simple sentence: <br />Mary doesn’...
Independent Clause<br />Mary doesn’t like to miss anything is a complete sentence – or you can use the fancy term and call...
What happens when you want to add more?<br />What if we want to add more details? <br />Mary doesn’t like to miss anything...
Can we combine these into one sentence? <br />Now we have two independent clauses about the same topic: <br />Mary doesn’t...
Ways to use Semicolons:<br />There are three main ways to use semicolons: <br />To join two independent clauses without an...
To join two independent clauses without any connecting terms:<br />I want to go to the store; mom wants to go to the movie...
To join two independent clauses with a conjunctive adverb and a comma<br />I like to swim; however, I like to bike even mo...
To separate items in a complicated list that already has commas.<br />We need to take a tent, a sleeping bag, and a compas...
For more information about how to use semicolons, please read the notes in the semicolon folder.<br />
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Semicolon usage presentation

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Semicolon usage presentation

  1. 1. Semicolon Usage<br />View this presentation to learn more about how to use semicolons, an awesome piece of punctuation. <br />
  2. 2. Let’s start by looking at why we might need a semicolon. <br />First, we will look at a simple sentence: <br />Mary doesn’t like to miss anything. <br />
  3. 3. Independent Clause<br />Mary doesn’t like to miss anything is a complete sentence – or you can use the fancy term and call it an independent clause. It has a subject (Mary) and a predicate (like). <br />
  4. 4. What happens when you want to add more?<br />What if we want to add more details? <br />Mary doesn’t like to miss anything. She stays up very late. <br />
  5. 5. Can we combine these into one sentence? <br />Now we have two independent clauses about the same topic: <br />Mary doesn’t like to miss anything. She stays up very late. <br />Let’s learn a new way to combine sentences:<br />Mary doesn’t like to miss anything; she stays up very late. <br />
  6. 6. Ways to use Semicolons:<br />There are three main ways to use semicolons: <br />To join two independent clauses without any connecting terms<br />To join two independent clauses with a conjunctive adverb and a comma<br />To separate items in a complicated list that already has commas. <br />
  7. 7. To join two independent clauses without any connecting terms:<br />I want to go to the store; mom wants to go to the movies. <br />Ralph hates school; Fred thinks it is a great place to spend the day. <br />The cat went to climb the tree; the dog chased it away. <br />
  8. 8. To join two independent clauses with a conjunctive adverb and a comma<br />I like to swim; however, I like to bike even more. <br />The sky looks grey; as a result, it might rain. <br />Sarah is studying; meanwhile, Jenny is at ball practice. <br />
  9. 9. To separate items in a complicated list that already has commas.<br />We need to take a tent, a sleeping bag, and a compass; a cook stove, a cooler, and some plates; and some boots, a coat, and rain gear when we go camping. <br />
  10. 10. For more information about how to use semicolons, please read the notes in the semicolon folder.<br />
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