Lindsey johnson's n5343 book review.ppt

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  • Hello and welcome to my book review of “How Full is your Bucket?” by Tom Rath and Donald O. Clifton. My name is Lindsey Johnson and I am a graduate student at the University of Texas at Arlington School of Nursing. I want to thank you for taking the time to listen to my book review.
  • Don Clifton is the coauthor of “How Full is Your Bucket?” and is the grandfather to Tom Rath (Dr. Donald O. Clifton, Founder, n.d.). He has his Ph.D. in educational psychology and was a professor at the University of Nebraska (Dr. Donald O. Clifton, Founder, n.d.). He is the founder of Selection Research and was a chairman at Gallup Inc. (Dr. Donald O. Clifton, Founder, n.d.). He invented the Clifton Strengths Finder, which is a tool for helping people discover their talents and improve their strengths, and authored three other books (Dr. Donald O. Clifton, Founder, n.d.). In 2002 he was awarded the honor of being named Father of Strengths Psychology by the American Psychological Association (Dr. Donald O. Clifton, Founder, n.d.). Donald Clifton is highly qualified to write this book based on his educational background and research.
  • Tom Rath, the other writer of “How Full is Your Bucket” has earned degrees from the University of Michigan and the University of Pennsylvania (Tom Rath, n.d.). He is currently the global practice leader for Gallup Inc. which is an organization that focuses on “employee engagement, selection, strengths-based development, leadership, and wellbeing”. (Tom Rath, n.d.). He has authored a total of 4 books, has been a number one bestselling author for the New York Times and has sold over four million copies of his books (Tom Rath, n.d.). While Tom Rath’s educational and research qualifications don’t match that of his grandfather, he makes up for it in his innate ability to be an influential writer and leader.
  • Don Clifton’s life work has been studying what is right with people instead of what is wrong (Rath & Clifton, 2004). He discovered that our interactions and relationships with others shape our daily lives (Rath & Clifton, 2004). The authors conclude that our interactions with others are almost always either positive or negative not neutral, therefore, it is crucial that we make our interactions positive (Rath & Clifton, 2004). Don Clifton’s motivation to study what is right with people began when he read a case study detailing the emotional effects of over 1,000 American soldiers who were prisoners of the Korean War (Rath & Clifton, 2004). The Korean War saw the highest number of prisoners of war (POW) death rates in U.S. military, due to denial of emotional support and interpersonal relationships or constant negativity (Rath & Clifton, 2004). The North Koreans did not torture the soldiers nor did they deny them of basic necessities such as: food, shelter, or water (Rath & Clifton, 2004). They did however, utilize four basic tactics to encourage negativity amongst the soldiers and break their allegiance to each other and their country; informing, self-criticism, breaking loyalty to leadership and country, and withholding of all positive emotional support (Rath & Clifton, 2004). From reading and analyzing this case study Clifton was able to understand that constant negative interactions and relationships with others leads a person to give up on life, consequently, that led him to research what constant positivity can do for a person’s emotional well-being (Rath & Clifton, 2004).
  • The purpose of this book is simple really. Rath and Clifton (2004) invented the theory of The Dipper and the Bucket and explain that each person has an invisible bucket and an invisible dipper and our bucket is either full or empty based on what other people say or do to us (Rath & Clifton, 2004). When our bucket is filled, we feel good and when our bucket is empty, we feel bad (Rath & Clifton, 2004).
  • Rath and Clifton (2004) state that every day we have a choice to either fill other people’s buckets or dip from them. We can fill other people’s buckets by doing or saying something positive or we can dip from other’s buckets by doing or saying something negative (Rath & Clifton, 2004). When we fill other people’s buckets we end up filling ours too from the positivity of the interaction but when we dip from others we take away from our own supply because of the negativity of the interaction (Rath & Clifton, 2004). A full bucket enables a person to be strong, optimistic and positive while an empty bucket decreases one’s energy and promotes negativity in a person (Rath & Clifton, 2004).
  • Donald Rath’s and Tom Clifton’s (2004) research included a survey of more than 15 million employees worldwide on the concept of positivity and praise in the workplace or as Tom and Donald call it “bucket filling”. The findings of the study included findings of increased engagement amongst colleagues, increased job satisfaction and intent to stay with the organization, increased productivity, increased loyalty and customer satisfaction scores, and increased safety in the workplace when the bucket theory was used in the organization (Rath & Clifton, 2004). It was found that at least 5 positive interactions were needed to combat 1 negative interaction and that people’s life spans could be lengthened by 10 years by having a positive outlook on life and utilizing bucket filling in everyday life.
  • The number one target audience for this book is employees of organizations but the theory given can be used by anyone in any role to increase positivity in work or life. Organizational leaders, teachers, and parents are highlighted throughout the book through scenarios given by the authors. I would highly recommend this book to anyone because this book contains multiple suggestions and scenarios that are easily understood and relatable in any situation.
  • Strengths of this book include that it is research based and easy to read. There are detailed stories and examples which help the reader to understand and connect with the content and the author’s provide a clear overview of the theory. Weaknesses of the book are that the book does not help the reader identify any of their own strengths and the research is not very detailed. The theory is also very elementary so while it sounds good and is easy to understand it is often difficult to get others to practice these methods in the workplace and everyday life.
  • Here is a list of my references.
  • Does anyone have any questions?
  • Well, thank you for taking the time to listen to my book review and watch my presentation on “How Full is Your Bucket?” and just remember to be positive!
  • Lindsey johnson's n5343 book review.ppt

    1. 1. How Full is Your Bucket?By: Tom Rath & Donald O. Clifton PH.D. BOOK REVIEW PRESENTED BY: LINDSEY JOHNSON RN UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT ARLINGTON MSN STUDENT IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF N5343 NURSING LEADERSHIP AND COMPLEX HEALTH SYSTEM SEPTEMBER 10, 2012
    2. 2. Don Clifton PH.D. (1924-2003)• PH.D. IN EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY• PROFESSOR AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA• FOUNDER OF SELECTION RESEARCH INC.• CHAIRMAN OF GALLUP INC.,• INVENTOR OF THE CLIFTON STRENGTHS FINDER• NAMED FATHER OF STRENGTHS PSYCHOLOGY (Dr. Donald O. Clifton, Founder, n.d.)
    3. 3. Tom Rath• DEGREES FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN AND THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA• GLOBAL PRACTICE LEADER FOR GALLUP INC.• #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLING AUTHOR• AUTHORED 4 BOOKS & SOLD OVER 4 MILLION COPIES (Tom Rath, n.d.)
    4. 4. Discoveries It is important to study what is Don Clifton’s right with people. Discoveries & Our interactions and relationships Motivations with others shape our lives. Interactions with others are almost always either positive or negative not neutral. Motivation Case study of: American prisoners of Korean War(Rath & Clifton, 2004)
    5. 5. Each person has an invisible bucket and dipper. Our bucket is either being emptied or filled based on what other people say or do to us. When our bucket is full, we feel good. When our bucket is empty, we feel bad. The Theory of the Dipper and the Bucket(Rath & Clifton, 2004)
    6. 6. PURPOSE WE HAVE A CHOICE EVERYDAY: FILL R DIPFull bucket= Empty bucket= Positivity, strength, and Negativity and decreased optimism energy (Rath & Clifton, 2004)
    7. 7. Research Surveyed more than 15 million employees worldwide on the concept of bucket filling. Findings:Regular recognition and praise lead to:  Engagement amongst colleagues  Intent to stay with an organization  Increased job satisfaction  Increased productivity  Increased loyalty and customer satisfaction scores  Increased worker safety Magic ratio: 5 positive interactions to every 1 negative interaction Life span could be lengthened by 10 years in people who have an increase in positive emotions (Rath & Clifton, 2004)
    8. 8. Target Audience #1 EMPLOYEES OF ORGANIZATIONS ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERS TEACHERS PARENTS ANYONE
    9. 9. “How Full is Your Bucket?”Strengths Weaknesses Research based  Book does not help Elementary or simple identify a person’s read strengths Detailed stories to  Research is not understand and detailed connect with content  Elementary theory Gives clear overview of theory
    10. 10. ReferencesDr. Donald O. Clifton, Founder. (n.d.) Clifton Strengths School. Retrieved from: http://www.strengths.org/clifton.shtmlRath, T. & Clifton, D. O. (2004). How full is your bucket? Positive strategies for work and life. New York, NY: Gallup Press.Tom Rath. (n.d.) Gallup Speakers Bureau. Retrieved from: http://www.gallup.com/speakersbureau/18562/ tom-rath.aspx
    11. 11. Questions?

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