Policiy Consideration To Protect Volunteers With Criminal Records
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Policiy Consideration To Protect Volunteers With Criminal Records

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CRB checking volunteers is meaningless without a policy to inform practice on how to decide if an offense is relevant, what else is need to ensure that volunteers are kept safe

CRB checking volunteers is meaningless without a policy to inform practice on how to decide if an offense is relevant, what else is need to ensure that volunteers are kept safe

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  • Addressing issues related to criminal convictions needs an objective common sense approach which takes account of: the vulnerability of the client group the volunteer is helping the orgnaisation’s duties in law the nature of the crime when it happened the circumstances involved the sentence patterns of offending efforts to avoid re-offending skills required to volunteer successfully safeguards in place against offending when volunteering possible reactions of workers, trustees, clients etc, objectively assessed.

Policiy Consideration To Protect Volunteers With Criminal Records Policiy Consideration To Protect Volunteers With Criminal Records Presentation Transcript

  • Voluntary Sector Consortia Consultation Checking and Barring Lizzie Saunders Volunteer Centre Manager
  • Common Sense Approach
    • Relevance of Offence
    • Rational Risk Assessment – Replicate
    • Fairness and transparency
    • Knowledge transparency confidentiality
    • Where is the decision made?
    • To whom do these rules apply?
  • Let he who is without sin cast the first stone
    • How can you tell?
    • Who do you need to ask?
    • How will you record your decision making process?
    • What processes are there in place to safeguard the volunteer?
    • Do these relate to and match those which apply to paid staff and service users?
  • Convicted, Contrite, Forgiven
    • How to manage volunteers with convictions – demonstrative, practical measures
    • Charity’s reputation
    • Service users
    • Community views
    • Who needs to know?
  • Keeping Records
    • Live action updates?
    • Useful progress markers?
    • Shared information?
    • Trial period
    • Informing the volunteer
    • Referral back to Volunteer Centre
  • What’s missing?