Semr presentation for august 9, 2012

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  • Biancarosa, C., & Snow, C. E. (2006). Reading next—A vision for action and research in middle andhigh school literacy: A report to Carnegie Corporation of New York (2nd ed.).Washington, DC: Alliancefor Excellent Education. -Page 3-
  • Consider a system for signing up to read the book when it’s available: it could be a list on the board, a sticky note inside the back cover of interested students, or a margarine container where students submit their names and a drawing occurs randomly at the end of the day (sort of like a silent auction)- You may want to have a “display area” (chalk trays work well) where recently featured books are displayed for a certain amount of time or where students who are looking for a new book can peruse. - Another effective strategy is to have related texts (same author, topic, non-fiction, website, etc) and ideas available for interested students
  • Good book choices for this activity:- The Librarian of Basra If the World Were a Village Science Verse John, Paul, George, and Ben Diary of a Wimpy Kid
  • Semr presentation for august 9, 2012

    1. 1. SEM-RSchoolwide Enrichment Model - Reading Presentation for Orange County Public School District Dr. Elizabeth Fogarty East Carolina University fogartye@ecu.edu
    2. 2. NRC The National Research CenterG/T on the Gifted and Talented www.gifted.uconn.edu
    3. 3. Our AgendaAM – What is the SEM-R? 10:00 am = Break Phase I: Book Hooks Phase 2: Supported Independent Reading 11:30-12:45pm = LunchPM – Phase 2 Continued Phase 3: Challenge and Choice Break Your Questions and Concerns
    4. 4. Our SessionsTalk & DoListen 30 minutes30 minutes Synthesize 30 minutes
    5. 5. Today’s ObjectiveO Participants will utilize book hooks, conferencing, and enrichment experiences to create a differentiated reading environment to meet the needs of individual students.
    6. 6. One Size Fits All
    7. 7. To Kill a Mockingbird Miss Caroline writes the alphabet on the board and Scout reads it through easily. Suspicious, Miss Caroline asks Scout to read from the reader and from the local paper. Then she forbids Scout to let Atticus teach her to read anymore. Miss Caroline tells her she can not read at home anymore. Scout explains she doesnt remember learning how to read, but it seems she always knew how. When Miss Caroline forbids her to continue reading, Scout realizes how important it is to her: "Until I feared I would lose it, I never loved to read. One does not love breathing."
    8. 8. Think Back… Choral Reading Waiting to ReadWaiting for others to catch up
    9. 9. What is ―Good Reading Instruction?‖Questions Answers1. How is reading taught at your school?2. What’s the purpose of teaching reading?3. What skills do we want our readers to be able touse?4. What are the goals of good reading instruction?
    10. 10. Many (but not all) talented readers read early • Read at least two grade levels above chronological grade placement • Begin reading early and may be self-taught
    11. 11. Talented readers enjoy the process of reading • Seek and enjoy• Read avidly and depth and with enjoyment complexity in• Use reading reading differently for • Develop a deeper different purposes understanding of• Thirst for insight particular topics and knowledge through reading through reading • Demonstrate• Pursue varied preferences for non- interests in texts fiction• View books as a • Pursue interest- way to explore the based reading richness of life opportunities
    12. 12. Talented readers have advanced language skills.• Enjoy the subtleties and complexities of language• Demonstrate advanced understanding of language• Use expansive vocabulary• Use reading to acquire a large repertoire of language skills• Use language for humor• Use colorful and descriptive phrasing• Demonstrate ease in use of language
    13. 13. Talented readers demonstrate advanced processing skills • Retain a large quantity of information for retrieval • Automatically integrate prior knowledge in reading • Utilize higher-order thinking skills such as analysis and synthesis • Process information and thoughts at an accelerated pace • Synthesize ideas in a comprehensive way • Perceive unusual relationships • Grasp complex ideas and nuances
    14. 14. Time Spent Reading in SchoolStudy by John Goodlad in A Place Called School Elementary 6% Middle 3% High 2%
    15. 15. "I didnt actually read the book, but I did play the video game loosely based on it."
    16. 16. Three Goals of SEM-RTo increase enjoyment in reading To improve reading fluency, comprehension, and increase reading achievement To encourage students to pursue challenging independent reading
    17. 17. Focus of SEM-R• Joyful reading• Reading above level• Acknowledging and celebrating students’ interests and strengths• Challenging conversations about reading• Increased self-regulation
    18. 18. Three-Legged Stool Renzulli (1977) Enrichment Triad Model
    19. 19. The Enrichment Triad Model (Renzulli, 1977) Type I Type II General Group Training Exploratory Activities Activities Type III Individual & Small Group Investigations of Real Problems
    20. 20. Key Concepts forTypes I, II, & III Enrichment Exposure to new books and genres Self-selection and choice Training in self-regulation and reading strategies and skills
    21. 21. Three-Legged Stool Renzulli (1977) Enrichment Triad ModelVygotsky (1962)Zone of Proximal Development
    22. 22. Zone of Proximal Development If the environment presents no such [challenging] tasks to the adolescent, makes no new demands on him, and does not stimulate his intellect by providing a sequence of new goals, his thinking fails to reach the highest stages, or reaches them with great delay. ~ Vygotsky
    23. 23. … the only books thatinfluence us are thosefor which we are ready,and which have gone alittle further down ourparticular path than wehave gone ourselves.~ E. M. Forster, English novelist
    24. 24. Three-Legged Stool Renzulli (1977) Enrichment Triad ModelVygotsky (1962) National Reading PanelZone of Proximal (2000) Development Need for further research
    25. 25. Components of the SEM-R Framework Phase 2 - Training & Self- Phase 3 - Interest & Phase 1 - Exposure Selected Reading Choice Components• High-interest book Training and discussions Introducing creative hooks for read aloud on Supported thinking Increasing degree of student selection Independent Reading Exploring the Internet• Higher-order thinking One-on-one teacher Genre studies probing questions conferences on higher Literary exploration• Bookmarks for level reading strategy Responding to books teachers with and instruction Investigation centers questions focusing on Bookmarks for students Focus on biographies advanced thinking posing higher-order Buddy reading skills and reading skill questions regarding Books on tape instruction that is character, plot, setting, Literature circles relevant to a broad Creative or expository considering the story, range of literature writing and other useful topics. Type III investigations Type II & Type III Type I Activities Type II Activities Investigations
    26. 26. Phase 1 - Exposure Phase 1• High-interest book hooks for read aloud Exposure - Book Hooks:• Higher-order thinking High interest read probing questions alouds and higher• Bookmarks for teachers with questions focusing order questions on advanced thinking skills and reading skill instruction that is relevant to a broad range of literature Type I Activities
    27. 27. Phase 2 - Training & Self- Selected Reading Phase 2Training and discussions on Supported IndependentSupported IndependentReading Reading (SIR) usingOne-on-one teacher individual conferencesconferences on higher levelreading strategy and and differentiatedinstruction reading instructionBookmarks for studentsposing higher-orderquestions regardingcharacter, plot, setting,considering the story, andother useful topics. Type II Activities
    28. 28. At first, I just wanted them to finish a book. Then I became moreconfident and would say, Come on now,that is just too easyfor you. They wouldsmile, because they knew I was right. ~ Treatment Teacher
    29. 29. Phase 3 Phase 3 - Interest & Choice Components Introducing creativeInterest and Choice thinking Exploring the Internet Increasing degree of student selection Genre studies Literary exploration Responding to books Investigation centers Focus on biographies Buddy reading Books on tape Literature circles Creative or expository writing Type III investigations Type II & Type III Investigations
    30. 30. In the beginning, I did not realize how much middleof the road reading instruction I did and how few of my kids I really challenged. ~ Treatment Teacher
    31. 31. Findings related to self-regulation in and task commitment in reading
    32. 32. In the SEM-R, our focus was on helping childrenshift from LEARNING TO READ to READING TO LEARN!
    33. 33. “We do not need toburn books to kill ourcivilization; we need only to leave them unread for a generation.” —R. M. Hutchins
    34. 34. A focus of our work in The Schoolwide EnrichmentModel is to increase enrichment opportunities and achievement andprovide differentiated instruction for all students, the core of SEM-R. A rising tide lifts all ships…
    35. 35. Joyful Reading - Pg. 9 Components of the SEM-R Framework Phase 1 - Exposure Phase 2 - Training & Self- Phase 3 - Interest & Selected Reading Choice Components• High-interest books to read Training and discussions on Introducing creative aloud Supported Independent thinking• Higher-order thinking Reading Exploring the Internet probing questions Supported Independent Genre studies• Bookmarks for teachers Reading Literary exploration with questions regarding One-on-one teacher Responding to books Investigation centers Blooms Taxonomy, conferences on reading Focus on biographies biography, character, strategies and instruction Buddy reading illustrations and other Bookmarks for students Books on tape topics relevant to the posing higher-order questions Literature circles study of literature regarding character, plot, Creative or expository setting, considering the story, writing and other useful topics. Type III investigations Type II & Type III Type I Activities Type II Activities Investigations
    36. 36. Find Someone Who. . .1. On a piece of paper, list your five favorite books.2. In a minute, you will have five minutes to find others who have also read those books.3. Try to find a different name for each book title.
    37. 37. Pg. 87 Phase 1 - Exposure Phase 1• High-interest book hooks for read aloud Exposure - Book Hooks:• Higher-order thinking High interest read probing questions alouds and higher• Bookmarks for teachers with questions focusing order questions on advanced thinking skills and reading skill instruction that is relevant to a broad range of literature Type I Activities
    38. 38. Talk & DoListen 30 minutes30 minutes Synthesize 30 minutes
    39. 39. In the SEM-R, the focus was not on me teaching, but rather on them learning. I did not have to spend hours on a lesson plan. Instead, I spent my time thinking of what to read to my students to get them excited about reading. ~ Treatment Teacher
    40. 40. Getting to Know You!1. Think back: What was your favorite book as a child?2. Share a memory about this book (or another book) with your neighbor. • What did you like about it? • What made it special to you? • What associations do you have with this book?
    41. 41. Book Hook
    42. 42. The students have broadened theirreading choices due to the fact that theyhave been introduced to all the genres,and many nonfiction and fiction books, thatthey may have never picked up.
    43. 43. A Primary FocusBefore you read aloud -- Take Three! 1. Exposure: Share why or how you chose the book. 2. Critical Thinking: Choose a question, theme, or strategy to guide your discussion about the literature. 3. Connections: Consider links to other books, websites, art, experiences, activities, or projects.
    44. 44. Teacher Read AloudGuidelines in Phase One • Use a book you enjoy. • Match the book to your audience. • Illustrate reading strategies • Change intonation, speed, and volume. • Leave them wanting to hear more. • Scaffold higher level thinking skills. • Choose multiple books by the same author. • Change genres and styles often. • Utilize great books on tape.
    45. 45. Developing a Question• Help your students see themselves as investigators collecting evidence: – Ask open-ended questions. – Tie answers back to the text. – Modeling is a Must! – Consider creative, offbeat ideas a bonus.
    46. 46. Jacket– Author information– Back cover– illustrationPublicationnformationWhy you enjoy thebook
    47. 47. Table Talk Every time I introduce a new book during Phase 1, five students seem to want to read it right away! What should I do? What about the students in my subsequent class periods?
    48. 48. Complexity of Ideas and Content‘The student, said the teacher, is crazy.The student said the teacher is crazy.’
    49. 49. Complexity of Ideas and Content‘Before fun was invented, people joined bell-ringing clubs.As a member at Boston’s Old North Church, Paul spent hours practicing in the belfry tower.’
    50. 50. Text Level‘Right away I saw a cloud that would make a wonderful tattoo; it looked exactly like a dog, if dogs had only two legs – on the top, not the bottom. I am not allowed to have tattoos yet …’
    51. 51. Text Level‘All the kids in the room made sounds as if they thought a talent show was exciting news. Except me, because it was N- O-T, not.But okay, fine, it wasn’t boring, either.’
    52. 52. Text Level‘But though he’s helped me make sense of what’s happened, and has earned my loyalty, the entire business is so extraordinarily secretive and complicated that I’ve long been convinced I will never learn anything about my past.’
    53. 53. Text Level‘The first place that I can well remember was a large, pleasant meadow. Over the hedge on one side we looked into a plowed field, and on the other, the gate to our mater’s house.’
    54. 54. Text Level ‘After sitting atop a virtual bomb and traveling nearly half a million miles; after battling 1202 alarms, low fuel, and frozen fuel slugs; after walking on an airless rock; . . .’Given to the most distinguished children’s informational bookpublished in the preceding year.
    55. 55. Text Level‘That year at Perkins had also given Helen a glimpse of her own future. She had learned about another deaf-blind boy named Tommy Stringer. Five-year-old Tommy had lived in a poor house and …’
    56. 56. Resources forFinding Books
    57. 57. Talk & DoListen 30 minutes30 minutes Synthesiz e 30 minutes
    58. 58. Your Turn1. Briefly examine a book on your table and look for a passage you might read aloud.2. Decide which bookmark question and/or reading strategy you might use to guide a book hook from this book.3. What other resources might you connect to this text?
    59. 59. Talk & DoListen 30 minutes30 minutes Synthesiz e 30 minutes
    60. 60. Weekly Book Hook Theme Ideas www.CarolHurst.com/subjects/subjects.html• Author• Historical Event (WW2, Hiroshima, Gold Rush, Pioneering, Colonialism)• Struggle• Race• Gender Issues• Big Questions (Why hate? Why love?)
    61. 61. Weekly Theme: Dealing with Change in Life The Dust BowlOut of the Dust A Year Down YonderBud Not Buddy
    62. 62. Weekly Theme: Freedom and the Loss of Freedom Sweet Clara and the Freedom QuiltJip: His Story To Be a Slave
    63. 63. Weekly Theme: Prejudice Day 1Dr. King uses some very interesting wording in his speeches. [Give one example] How would you have said the same thing? (MC text to self)For what purposes should someone use these books? (MC text to text)
    64. 64. Day 2Why do you think that Dr. King’s sister would decide to write a book about her brother? (Making Inferences)How does Ms. Anderson’s personality contribute to her success or failure? (Making Inferences)How do these two books add to the information that we discussed yesterday? (MC text to text)
    65. 65. Day 3How do the events in the passages from these two books relate to what was going on in the world during the stories’ time periods? (MC text to world)What questions do you have about the time period in which these books tookplace? (Questioning)What kind of text could you use to find answers to your questions? (MC text to text)
    66. 66. Day 4 As I read from this book, I want you to make a picture in your head of the characters and the setting. Be ready to tell me what you see. (Visualization)
    67. 67. DAY 5Today’s books aredifferent from the bookswe’ve book talked theother days this week, butthey have a similar theme.How are they different? (MC text to text)What seems to be thetheme for this week’sbooks? (Synthesis)
    68. 68. Online Resources• http://www.gifted.uconn.edu/semr• Beth Newingham’s website• Amazon Trailer of The Graveyard Book• The Book Hive
    69. 69. http://www.bookhive.org/
    70. 70. http://nancykeane.com/rl/
    71. 71. Phase 2 Pg. 113Phase 2 - Training & Self- Selected ReadingTraining and discussions on Supported IndependentSupported IndependentReading Reading (SIR) usingOne-on-one teacher individual conferencesconferences on higher levelreading strategy and and differentiatedinstruction reading instructionBookmarks for studentsposing higher-orderquestions regardingcharacter, plot, setting,considering the story, andother useful topics. Type II Activities
    72. 72. Talk & DoListen 30 minutes30 minutes Synthesize 30 minutes
    73. 73. Supported Independent Reading was notsustained silent reading
    74. 74. Individualizing and Differentiating Conferences It is important to remember that not all students will need the same strategy instruction at the very same time, but that all students need some instruction if they are reading a book that is adequately challenging. For that reason, be sure that strategy instruction is integrated throughout conferences and differentiated to meet the needs of individual students.
    75. 75. Phase Two Goals• Students will . . .  Enjoy reading books of their own selection  Read appropriately challenging books (1 to 1.5 above their current reading level)  Develop self-regulation skills to enable them to read appropriately challenging books for at least 25-35 minutes each day  Have individualized reading instruction that is tailored to each student’s needs
    76. 76. Phase 2 is atime that thestudents can’twait for. Beingable to sitanywhere in theclass, in anyposition thatthey want helpsthem to reallydive deep intotheir reading.
    77. 77. Common Conference Elements: Beginning Element Teacher Action Welcome student andGreeting establish positive rapport Check reading log and bookMonitor reading habits choiceDetermine book match and Assess student’s oralreading needs reading with chosen text p. 96-97
    78. 78. Common Conference Elements: Core Element Teacher Action Ask questions, promptMonitor comprehension thinking, and engage student in conversation about book Provide reading strategyIdentify applicable reading instruction and scaffoldstrategies student’s strategy use Support decoding andAttend to word-level needs vocabulary knowledge
    79. 79. Common Conference Elements: Conclusion Element Teacher Action Praise student’s readingEngender positive feelings effortSupport reading Help the student set readingindependence goals - Sweeny, 2008
    80. 80. Developing Conference Skills• Maintaining brevity and efficiency• Differentiating questions and strategies• Ensuring self-regulation in the rest of the class• Determining documentation that works for you
    81. 81. ―I have truly found the SEM-R model to beone of the most beneficial readingprograms in which students gained themost academically in comparison to thereading curriculum of prior years.‖
    82. 82. I have a class full of extremelyenthusiastic readers who look forward to independent reading.
    83. 83. Having them read out of their comfort zone(current reading level or lower) has provento stretch their minds in ways that haveamazed me. They have learned how toselect books that are a challenge tothem, and devour them, to only quickly getanother that is one their reading list.
    84. 84. I have seen gains in theirfluency, comprehension, as well as word skills. It is truly amazing.
    85. 85. • The conversation structure, content, & tone• Strategies used by teachers• Responses of studentsDifferentiated Reading Conferences
    86. 86. The individual conferences were so helpful. My average to above average readers really surprised me. They went beyond what I everthought they could do with advanced thinking skills and questioning skills. ~ Treatment Teacher
    87. 87. Conferencing Questions
    88. 88. In the beginning mykids looked at me as if I had two headswhen I took the booksaway from them and told them that theywere reading a book that was too easy for them. ~ Treatment Teacher
    89. 89. Explicit Strategy InstructionSupport the struggling reader: i. Decoding ii. FluencyFoster Comprehension: i. Synthesizing ii. Making inferences iii. Making connections iv. Determining importance v. Visualizing vi. Questioning vii. Metacognition
    90. 90. The one on one five minute conferencesare the best way for me to monitor eachchild’s unique learning needs, and beable to use strategies individually foreach student that benefits them themost.
    91. 91. The five minutes with each has been afavorite time for my students, and manytimes I have had to cut them off.
    92. 92. Table TalkI’m concerned about my talentedreaders. Many have the ability toread at a college level, but I’mworried about adult content andfielding calls from alarmed parents.What can I do to avoid pitfalls andstill find challenging, interestingbooks for my students?
    93. 93. Table TalkI know I need to differentiate myreading conferences, but I am alsotrying to get all my students to focuson theme as a literary element rightnow. Can I ask everybody the samequestions, or do I need to come upwith different questions for everystudent?
    94. 94. I chose to go to them for the conferencesto help make them feel morecomfortable, and keep them in theirreading mode with the least interruption.
    95. 95. While conferencing with them I have hadto get into some funny positions! 
    96. 96. After our conference is done they pick upwhere they left off, and stay glued to thebook until time is up, at which timeeveryone MOANS!
    97. 97. I am able to stretch their minds with thehigher level questions that I used in everyconference. I absolutely love the bookmarks,and placed them on rings to use.
    98. 98. Reading Strategies Making Making MakingConnections Connections ConnectionsDetermining Determining DeterminingImportance Importance ImportanceQuestioning Questioning Questioning Visualizing Visualizing/ Visualizing & Sensory Images Inferring Making Making Inferences InferencesSummarizing Synthesizing SynthesizingMetacognition Paris, 2004 Keene & Zimmerman, 1997 Harvey & Goudvis, 2000
    99. 99. Synthesizing Synthesizing is a process of culling through much information to describe or retell the details as a salient whole. Often, synthesis includes projecting knowledge into a new context or setting as well.Examples:Compare the main character’s personality at the beginning of the story to his or her personality at the end?If you were to visit the setting of the story, what would you pack to help you survive there?
    100. 100. Making Connections Making connections allows readers to bring background knowledge (activate schema) and, therefore, a deeper understanding to the texts they read.Examples:How does this story relate to your own life?Does this book remind you of another book that you have read?Do you think your friends would enjoy meeting the main character?
    101. 101. Making Connections IncludesText to self A text to self connection involves the reader making an authentic connection between someone or something in the story to themselves.Text to world A text to world connection is when the reader makes a connection between the text and something that has happened or is happening in the world.Text to text A text to text connection is when the reader can find a commonality between two texts. In this case, a text is anything written, (i.e., a book, a poem, or a song).
    102. 102. Making Inferences Inferences are things that a reader concludes from reading that are not directly stated in the text.Examples:Why did the author write this book?List details about the setting that might help determine where the story takes place.
    103. 103. Questioning Questioning occurs as readers ask themselves questions about the text that they are reading.Examples:What is one big question you still have after reading this book?What questions are you thinking about as you read?
    104. 104. Visualizing Visualizing involves making pictures in one’s brain of what is going on in a scene or story that is read or heard.Examples:Which scene would you most like to illustrate? Why?How do you picture the main character?
    105. 105. Determining Importance Students must evaluate material to figure out which parts are most important or valuable to use in building understanding of the text.Examples:What were some of the most important parts in the story?How does the main character stand out from the other characters?
    106. 106. Metacognition Metacognition is thinking about one’s own thinking. Enhancing metacognition during reading draws the reader’s attention to the processes they are using as they read so that they can be more cognizant of them.Examples:How has the book influenced your viewpoint?Has any part of the book confused you?
    107. 107. Using the Bookmarks to Support Read-Aloud• The bookmarks are based on literary techniques as well as reading comprehension strategies.
    108. 108. Talk & DoListen 30 minutes30 minutes Synthesiz e 30 minutes
    109. 109. KnowledgeMaking Inferences Making Inferences Making Connections (T-S) Making Connections (T-W) Synthesis
    110. 110. Page105
    111. 111. Student reflection on readingStudent participation in assessment and reviewExplicit strategy instructionPurpose for reading and goal settingEfficacy building via specific feedback
    112. 112. Table TalkWhat do we do with Amanda?Every time I conferencewith Amanda she isreading the samesimple book.However, she’s a reallytalented reader whodeserves to bechallenged!
    113. 113. Talk & DoListen 30 minutes30 minutes Synthesiz e 30 minutes
    114. 114. Strategies and Areas of Focus for ConferencesCategory Strategy/Focus Area Background knowledge, compare/contrast, inferring,Comprehension main idea, metacognition, predicting, questioning, sequencing, summarizing, visualizingConnections Text-to-text, text-to-self, text-to-worldHigher-level thinking Analysis, evaluation, judgment, synthesisText characteristics Genres, Narrative elements, Non-narrative elementsLiterary elements Author’s craft, themeWord-level Decoding, fluency, pace, rereading, skimming, skipping,instruction syllabication, vocabulary Affective response, autonomy, habits, locating evidenceHabits & attitude in text, previewing selection, setting purposeBook selection Appropriate, easy, difficult, purpose for selection
    115. 115. Enjoyable activities, in contrast,―are not natural; they demand aneffort that initially one is reluctantto make. But once the interactionstarts to provide feedback to theperson’s skills, it usually begins tobe intrinsically rewarding‖ — Csikszentmihalyi, 1990
    116. 116. SIR Conference RubricStudent Name: _________________________________________________________Date: __________________ Teacher: ___________________ ALWAYS USUALLY RARELY NEVER Student usesthe reading process ef ectively. f 3 2 1 0 Uses strategies to determine meaning & increase vocabulary: conte xt cl e s u The student constructs meaning from a wide range of texts. 3 2 1 0 Determines main ide a/de tails, se que nce events. Identifies authorÕs purpose . Recognizes use of compare & contrast The student understands the common features of literary forms. 3 2 1 0 Understands the development of plot. Knows the similarities & differences among characte rs, se ttings, and eve nts. The student responds critically to fiction, non-fiction, poetry, & drama. 3 2 1 0 Student identifies cause and e ffect relationships in literary text. TOTAL SCORE: ______/12 12-11= A 10- 9= B 8-7= C 6-4= D 3-below= FAre a(s) of Conce rn (circle): LA.A.1.2.3- context clues LA.A.2.2.1- main idea, details LA.A.2.2.1- sequence pLA.E.1.2.2- plot LA.A.2.2.2- authorÕs urpose LA.A.2.2.7- compare & contrast LA.A.2.2.8 & LA.A.2.2.5- graphic sourcesLA.E.1.2.3- characters LA.E.2.2.1- cause & effect Henegar 2005Comments:
    117. 117. Classroom Management• Strategies to support self-regulation – Suns and Clouds – Teacher moving around the classroom – Have students use post-its when they have a question about a word – Students who are really struggling: • Personal timer (10 minutes) • Listen to books on CD • Get up, get a drink, stretch
    118. 118. Classroom Management• Set ground rules: – State your expectations in advance of the conferences – Keep conference interruptions to a minimum• Let the students decide how long reading time is. When the majority of students have lost focus, time is up.
    119. 119. Phase 3Pg. 130 Phase 3 - Interest & Choice Components Introducing creative Interest and Choice thinking Exploring the Internet Increasing degree of student selection Genre studies Literary exploration Responding to books Investigation centers Focus on biographies Buddy reading Books on tape Literature circles Creative or expository writing Type III investigations Type II & Type III Investigations
    120. 120. Talk & DoListen 15 minutes15 minutes Synthesize 10 minutes
    121. 121. Phase three in my classroom has beenreserved for Fridays. It makes Friday atime in which students look forward to, bybeing able to buddy read, work on a bookshare project, creative training, listeningcenters, literature circles, etc.
    122. 122. The commitment to their chosen activitywas definitely seen through the dedicationthat took place.
    123. 123. Components of the SEM-R Framework Phase 1 - Exposure Phase 2 - Training & Self- Phase 3 - Interest & Selected Reading Choice Components• High-interest books to Training and discussions on Introducing creative read aloud Supported Independent thinking• Higher-order thinking Reading Exploring the Internet probing questions Supported Independent Genre studies• Bookmarks for teachers Reading Literary exploration with questions regarding One-on-one teacher Responding to books Investigation centers Blooms Taxonomy, conferences on reading Focus on biographies biography, character, strategies and instruction Buddy reading illustrations and other Bookmarks for students Books on tape topics relevant to the posing higher-order Literature circles study of literature questions regarding Creative or expository character, plot, setting, writing considering the story, and Type III investigations other useful topics. Type II & Type III Type I Activities Type II Activities Investigations
    124. 124. Interests Choices Enrichment
    125. 125. Phase 3 Projects• Build on student interest• Encourage independence• Allow work with complex and abstract ideas• Enable long-term and in-depth work on topics of interest• Develop task commitment and self-regulation• Teach planning and research skills at advanced levels
    126. 126. Phase 3 Choices• Buddy reading• Literature circles• Creativity training exercises• Independent projects• Online reading and research
    127. 127. Talk & DoListen 30 minutes30 minutes Synthesiz e 30 minutes
    128. 128. Talk & DoListen 30 minutes30 minutes Synthesiz e 30 minutes
    129. 129. Technology and Phase 3Accessing e-books and audio booksContacting children’s authors on-line Accessing writers’ web pages Webquests
    130. 130. Things to discuss, decide, and plan:• Student reading logs• Scheduling• Teaming?• Resources• Leveling books in your classroom library
    131. 131. I would love to seeSEM-R taking placein all schools, as ithas shown me thatthis really is abeneficial way forkids to become thebest readers. Idefinitely will usethis next year withmy new class! I amproud to say I havea classroom ofREADERS!
    132. 132. We are teaching kids to enjoy reading, andalong with that they are making big stridesacademically. We need to reach allstudents so that they do become lifelongreaders, which lead to lifelong learnerswho are successful! Thank you for offeringthis pilot program, I am thrilled to have hada chance to participate in it.
    133. 133. How is using the SEM-R likeeating a tomato?
    134. 134. “In a completely rational society, thebest of us would aspire to be teachersand the rest of us would have to settle for something less, because passingcivilization along from one generation to the next ought to be the highest honor and the highest responsibility anyone could have.” -Lee Iacocca
    135. 135. Thank you!For more information, contact: fogartye@ecu.edu
    136. 136. Exit Ticket for Day 1Something I learned today is . . .Something I’m still wondering about is . . .
    137. 137. Self-Regulated LearningZimmerman (1989) defined self-regulated learning as involving theregulation of three general aspects of academic learning.First, self-regulation of behavior • active control of various resources students have available- such as time, study environment-where they study • use of peers and faculty members to helpSecond, self-regulation of motivation and affect • controlling and changing motivational beliefs such as self-efficacy and goal orientation • controlling emotions and affect in ways that improve learning.Third, self-regulation of cognition • control of various cognitive strategies for learning such as the use of deep processing strategies for better learning and increased performance.
    138. 138. Self-Regulation in Phase TwoSelf-regulation before reading - • Which book will I read? • Where will I read? • Will this location allow me to focus on my reading? • What will my reading focus be? • Do I have all my SEM-R materials?
    139. 139. Self-Regulation in Phase Two - continuedSelf-regulation during reading - • Am I focused on my reading? • Am I being distracted? By what? • How can I encourage myself to stay focused? • What questions do I have?
    140. 140. Sample Self-Regulation RubricRate yourself on each question on ascale from 1-4: 4 3 2 1 I really need to All the time Most of the time Some of the time focus on this • Did I have all of my SEM-R materials? • Did I remain in my reading area? • Was I focused for the entire SEM-R time? • If I got distracted was I able to refocus quickly?
    141. 141. Tools and Techniques to Support SIR• Self-regulation systems• Sticky notes• Signal cards• Timer• Personal CD players
    142. 142. Your Turn:Create Your Own Theme Book Lists• Create a week-long series of book hooks• Work alone, in pairs, or small groups (by grade level, for instance)• Use library resources and computersGOAL:Create a themed book hook list for a week

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