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FROM CITATION CONSUMER TO CITATIONPRODUCER: WORKING WITH STUDENTSON SOURCE CITATION IN MULTIPLEGENRES IN THE WRITING CENTE...
“The new literacies will increasingly beincorporated into writing centers not just assources of information or delivery sy...
“When our students are distracted by arcanecitation rules, when they spend more timecreating a list of works cited than th...
RIFFING OFF OF DOUG DOWNS . . .To  approach source citation rhetorically, we need to take into account how it is situated...
QUESTIONS ABOUT SOURCES Why did you choose this source? (Why do you want  to be associated with this person?) Were there...
“the teacher remains anaudience for studenttexts, but by no means theonly audience” (57)Lunsford, Andrea A., and Lisa Ede....
TWO RHETORICAL SITUATIONS1.   The “real” rhetorical situation: the student is     composing for a professor who wants sour...
“If I were asked how I would like writingcenters to be positioned in academia‟sfuture, I would offer a picture of us asthe...
WORKS CITED   Downs, Doug. “Rhetoric, Not Modes: The Inadequacy of „Critical‟ Reading for Writing-about-    Writing.” Con...
From Citation Consumer to Citation Producer: Working with Students on Source Citation in Multiple Genres in the Writing Ce...
From Citation Consumer to Citation Producer: Working with Students on Source Citation in Multiple Genres in the Writing Ce...
From Citation Consumer to Citation Producer: Working with Students on Source Citation in Multiple Genres in the Writing Ce...
From Citation Consumer to Citation Producer: Working with Students on Source Citation in Multiple Genres in the Writing Ce...
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From Citation Consumer to Citation Producer: Working with Students on Source Citation in Multiple Genres in the Writing Center

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presented at Conference on College Composition & Communication, Las Vegas, NV. March 2013.

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Transcript of "From Citation Consumer to Citation Producer: Working with Students on Source Citation in Multiple Genres in the Writing Center"

  1. 1. FROM CITATION CONSUMER TO CITATIONPRODUCER: WORKING WITH STUDENTSON SOURCE CITATION IN MULTIPLEGENRES IN THE WRITING CENTERElizabeth KleinfeldWriting Center DirectorMetropolitan State University of Denverekleinfe@msudenver.edu
  2. 2. “The new literacies will increasingly beincorporated into writing centers not just assources of information or delivery systems fortutoring but as productive arts in their ownright, and writing center work will, if anything,become more rhetorical in paying attention tothe practices and effects of design in writtenand visual communication —more productoriented and perhaps less like the composingconferences of the process movement.” (30)Trimbur, John. “Multiliteracies, Social Futures, and Writing Centers.”The Writing Center Journal 20.2 (Spring/Summer 2000): 29-31.
  3. 3. “When our students are distracted by arcanecitation rules, when they spend more timecreating a list of works cited than they docomposing a paper, they won‟t be inspired tosee themselves as people who can makemeaning. Instead, they will focus on avoidingpunishment by carefully describing thecontainers of other people‟s ideas. They‟llmiss the whole point.” Fister, Barbara. “Docudrama: Why Sources Matter—And Why Citing them Correctly Doesnt.” Conference on College Composition and Communication Annual Conference, Atlanta, GA: April 2011. Conference Presentation.
  4. 4. RIFFING OFF OF DOUG DOWNS . . .To approach source citation rhetorically, we need to take into account how it is situated, motivated, contingent, interactional, and epistemic.
  5. 5. QUESTIONS ABOUT SOURCES Why did you choose this source? (Why do you want to be associated with this person?) Were there other sources you considered but opted not to use? Why? (Who do you not want to be associated with and why?) What kinds of sources does this source use? (Who does this author associate with?)
  6. 6. “the teacher remains anaudience for studenttexts, but by no means theonly audience” (57)Lunsford, Andrea A., and Lisa Ede. “Among the Audience: On Audiencein an Age of New Literacies.” Engaging Audience: Writing in an Age ofNew Literacies. M. Elizabeth Weiser, Brian M. Fehler, and Angela M.Gonzalez, Eds. Urbana, IL: NCTE, 2009. 42-69.
  7. 7. TWO RHETORICAL SITUATIONS1. The “real” rhetorical situation: the student is composing for a professor who wants sources cited in an academically-recognizable way2. The invoked/imagined rhetorical situation: the student is composing for an audience who wants sources cited in a way that is contextually appropriate
  8. 8. “If I were asked how I would like writingcenters to be positioned in academia‟sfuture, I would offer a picture of us asthe recognized campus leaders whosevision of how learning environmentsshould be structured has come todominate educational thinking.” (13)Harris, Muriel. “Preparing to Sit at the Head of the Table: Maintaining WritingCenter Viability in the Twenty-First Century.” The Writing Center Journal 20.2(Spring/Summer 2000): 13-21.
  9. 9. WORKS CITED Downs, Doug. “Rhetoric, Not Modes: The Inadequacy of „Critical‟ Reading for Writing-about- Writing.” Conference on College Composition and Communication Annual Conference, Las Vegas, NV: March 2013. Conference Presentation. Fister, Barbara. “Docudrama: Why Sources Matter—And Why Citing them Correctly Doesnt.” Conference on College Composition and Communication Annual Conference, Atlanta, GA: April 2011. Conference Presentation. Griffin, Jo Ann. “Making Connections with Writing Centers.” Multimodal Composition: Resources for Teachers. Cynthia Selfe, Ed. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press, 2007. 153-165. Harris, Muriel. “Preparing to Sit at the Head of the Table: Maintaining Writing Center Viability in the Twenty-First Century.” The Writing Center Journal 20.2 (Spring/Summer 2000): 13-21. Jamieson, S. & Howard, RM. (2011). Phase I data. In The citation project. Retrieved fromhttp://site.citationproject.net/ Lunsford, Andrea A., and Lisa Ede. “Among the Audience: On Audience in an Age of New Literacies.” Engaging Audience: Writing in an Age of New Literacies. M. Elizabeth Weiser, Brian M. Fehler, and Angela M. Gonzalez, Eds. Urbana, IL: NCTE, 2009. 42-69. McClure, R. & Clink, K. (2009). How do you know that? An investigation of student research practices in the digital age. Libraries and the Academy, 9(1): 115-132. Pemberton, Michael. “Planning for Hypertexts in the Writing Center . . . Or Not.” Writing Center Journal 24.1 (Fall/Winter 2003): 9-24. Trimbur, John. “Multiliteracies, Social Futures, and Writing Centers.” The Writing Center Journal 20.2 (Spring/Summer 2000): 29-31. Email me at ekleinfe@msudenver.edu
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