ARTID111 Ancient Egyptian Art - Part 1
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ARTID111 Ancient Egyptian Art - Part 1

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  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD with modifications by Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.

ARTID111 Ancient Egyptian Art - Part 1 ARTID111 Ancient Egyptian Art - Part 1 Presentation Transcript

    • ART ID 111 | Study of Ancient Arts
        • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD
        • NYIT Center for Teaching and Learning with Technology
        • With modifications by Arch. Edeliza V. Macalandag, UAP
    Pharaohs and the Afterlife: Ancient Egyptian Art Part 1
  •  
  • Objectives
    • Identify the formal and iconographic characteristics of painting and sculpture from the Early Dynastic to New Kingdom periods
    • Discuss the funerary function and content of Egyptian art and architecture
    • Explain the relationship of Egyptian art and architecture and the Nile River
    • Describe the types of structures built in ancient Egypt and explain their functions
    • Identify how the Egyptian political system and their religious beliefs are reflected in works of art and architecture
    • Discuss the materials and techniques of Egyptian art
    • Explain the development and use of the Egyptian hieroglyphic writing system
    • Identify examples of intercultural contact between Egypt and other ancient civilizations
  • THE LAND OF THE NILE
    • The Birth of Egyptology
    • In the Middle Ages, Egypt's reputation as an ancient land of wonders and mystery lived on. Until the 18th century, people regarded its undeciphered writing and exotic monuments as treasures of occult wisdom, locked away from any but those initiated in the mystic arts.
  • Ancient Egypt 101
    • Located in the Nile river valley; civilization developed by about 3,000 BC
    • Protected from invaders by:
      • mountains to the south
      • vast deserts on both sides
      • Mediterranean Sea to the north
    • This location kept Egypt separate from the rest of the world, so the Egyptians had a unique and enduring style of life & art for about 3,000 years
  • Ancient Egypt 101
    • Communities were made up of: Hunters and fishermen; Soldiers; Slaves; Priests; Scribes; Artists and craftsmen; Farmers and herdsmen
    • Artists, craftsmen and scribes were honored and admired. A scribe is a scholar who could read and write.
    • Their leader , the pharaoh , was believed to be half man, half god. The afterlife of the pharaoh is an important theme in ancient Egyptian art.
  • Major Contributions to the World
    • Quarrying, surveying and construction techniques that facilitated the building of monumental pyramids, temples, and obelisks; made bricks
    • Irrigation systems and agricultural production techniques; harnessed animals for work
    • The first known ships; used sails on the water
    • Used wheels on land
    • Trained donkeys to carry people
  • Major Contributions to the World
    • Combined copper and tin to make bronze; forged tools from copper
    • Developed hieroglyphics .
    • The greatest architectural achievements of the Ancient Egyptians were the pyramids.
    • A system of mathematics
    • A practical and effective system of medicine
    • Egyptian faience and glass technology
    • new forms of literature
    • the earliest known peace treaty
  • Ancient Egyptian Art Forms
    • Architecture - The style developed during the Pre-dynastic period remained unchanged for 2000 years
    • Crafts & Sculpture  - Symbolic elements were widely used and strict laws were applied
    • Paintings  - The pictures found in Egyptian tombs were connected with the idea of afterlife
  • Themes of Ancient Egyptian Art
    • State religion is its prime theme.
    • Best known for its carvings. The art of carving reached its first peak in 2600 B.C.. Egyptian Art includes a range of art forms like stone carving of large and small statues and wall art. Egyptian figures (human forms) tend to possess a certain regal presence which glorifies the ruling case.
    • Characterized by perfect observation and representation of life forms and symbolism (esp. the use of symbols for Gods and Goddesses) with less weightage to beautification
  • Themes of Ancient Egyptian Art
    • An important reason for the emphasis on vivid depiction of life forms is the Egyptian belief in life after death and their expectation that the dead would bank on their art for company in the “other world”.
    • Mortar was not used. Work was planned such that the stones - made of sun-dried and kiln baked bricks, granite, limestone or fine sandstone – fit exactly into one another like a jigsaw. 
    • The themes of Egyptian painting included protective Gods of the underworld and man’s voyage through life after death.
  • Pre-Dynastic Art The Predynastic, or prehistoric, beginnings of Egyptian civilization are chronologically vague. But tantalizing remains from around 3500 BCE attest to the existence of a sophisticated civilization on the banks of the Nile.
  • The  Early Dynastic Period  saw the:
    • Formation of cultural identity
    • Stone Artifacts
    • Mud minor arts - pottery, vases and bowls
    • Brick architecture
  • watercolor copy of a wall painting from tomb 100 at Hierakonpolis, Egypt ca. 3500-3200 BCE | Paint on plaster, approx. 16' 3 long. http://employees.oneonta.edu/farberas/arth/Images/109images/egyptian/hierakonpolis_pntg.jpg
  • watercolor copy of a wall painting from tomb 100 at Hierakonpolis, Egypt ca. 3500-3200 BCE | Paint on plaster, approx. 16' 3 long. http://employees.oneonta.edu/farberas/arth/Images/109images/egyptian/hierakonpolis_pntg.jpg Found along the oldest tomb’s plaster walls; contains presumed religious scenes and images that include figures that will appear in Egyptian culture for three thousand years—a funerary cortege of barques, possibly a goddess standing between two upright lionesses, a wheel of various horned quadrupeds, several examples of a staff that became associated with the deity of the earliest cattle culture and one being help up by a heavy-breasted goddess, asses or zebras, ibex, ostriches, lionesses, impala, gazelles, and cattle.
  • THE UNIFICATION OF EGYPT In Predynastic times, Egypt was divided geographically and politically into Upper Egypt (the southern, upstream part of the Nile Valley), which was dry, rocky, and culturally rustic, and Lower (northern) Egypt, which was opulent, urban, and populous.
  • Palette of King Narmer from Hierakonpolis, Egypt ca. 3,000-2,920 B.C.E. | siltstone | approx 25 in. high REVERSE OBVERSE The Narmer Palette is a 63-centimetre tall (2.07 ft), shield-shaped, ceremonial palette, carved from a single piece of flat, soft dark gray-green siltstone. The stone has often been wrongly identified, in the past, as being slate or schist. Slate is layered and prone to flaking, and schist is a metamorphic rock containing large, randomly-distributed mineral grains. Both are unlike the finely-grained, hard, flake-resistant siltstone, whose source is from a well-attested quarry that has been used since pre-dynastic times at Wadi Hammamat.
  • It is thought by some to depict the unification of Upper and Lower Egypt under the king Narmer. On one side, the king is depicted with the bulbed (flowering lotus) White crown of Upper (southern) Egypt, and the other side depicts the king wearing the level Red Crown of Lower (northern) Egypt whose symbol was the papyrus. Palette of King Narmer from Hierakonpolis, Egypt ca. 3,000-2,920 B.C.E. | siltstone | approx 25 in. high http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:NarmerPalette_ROM-gamma.jpg REVERSE OBVERSE
  • A mastaba is a type of Ancient Egyptian tomb in the form of a flat-roofed, rectangular structure with outward sloping sides that marked the burial site of many eminent Egyptians of Egypt's ancient period. Mastabas were constructed out of mud-bricks or stone.
  • The mastaba was the standard type of tomb in pre-dynastic and early dynastic Egypt for both the pharaoh and the social elite. Mastaba of Faraoun, at Saqqara
  •  
  • Step Pyramid of Djoser, Saqqara, Egypt ca. 2,630-2,611 B.C.E. limestone The first monumental royal tomb, built in stone by the architect Imhotep for King Djoser at Saqqara, comprised a stepped pyramid, temple, and other buildings within a large, rectangular enclosure surrounded by a high wall.
  • Djoser is the best-known pharaoh of the Third dynasty of Egypt. The painted limestone statue of Djoser, now in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, is the oldest known life-sized Egyptian statue.In contemporary inscriptions, he is called Netjerikhet, meaning "body of the gods." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Djoser
  • This first Egyptian pyramid consisted of six mastabas (of decreasing size) built atop one another in what were clearly revisions and developments of the original plan.
  •  
  • Step Pyramid and Mortuary of Djoser, Saqqara, Egypt ca. 2,630-2,611 B.C.E. | limestone
  • http://www.planetware.com/map/saqqara-pyramid-of-djoser-map-egy-spd.htm
  • Columnar entrance to the Mortuary of Djoser Saqqara, Egypt ca. 2,630-2,611 B.C.E. limestone Mortuary temples (or memorial temples) were temples constructed adjacent to, or in the vicinity of, royal tombs in the Ancient Egypt. The temples were designed to commemorate the reign of the pharaoh by whom they were built, as well as for use by the pharaoh's cult after death.
  • Hypostyle Hall Mortuary of Djoser Saqqara, Egypt ca. 2,630-2,611 B.C.E. limestone
  • Façade of the North Palace Mortuary of Djoser Saqqara, Egypt ca. 2,630-2,611 B.C.E. limestone
  • Tomb of Perneb (mastaba) from Saqqara, Egypt ca. 2,350-2,323 B.C.E. | limestone | approximately 16 ft. high
  • Tomb of Perneb (mastaba) from Saqqara, Egypt ca. 2,350-2,323 B.C.E. | limestone | approximately 16 ft. high
  • http://teachers.sduhsd.k12.ca.us/ltrupe/art%20history%20web/final/chap3Egypt/Mastaba%20Layout.bmp
  • Tomb of Perneb (mastaba) from Saqqara, Egypt ca. 2,350-2,323 B.C.E. | limestone | approximately 16 ft. high
  • The most remarkable change was the transition of Step Pyramids to 'true' pyramids with smooth surfaces. This transition was the result of technical skills. The 'true' pyramid was considered as a solar symbol. Old Kingdom Art
  • There was a rapid development of the stylistic conventions that characterized Egyptian art throughout its history. Old Kingdom Art
  • In statuary, various standing and seated types were developed, but there was strict adherence to the law of frontalism and a tendency to emphasize symmetry and to minimize suggestion of movement. Old Kingdom Art
  • Probably because of its relative impermanence, painting was little used as a medium of representation; it appears to have served principally as accessory to sculpture. A rare example is the painting of geese from a tomb at Meidum. Old Kingdom Art
  • Religious beliefs of the era held that the happy posthumous existence of the dead depended on the continuation of all phases of their earthly life. Old Kingdom Art The artist's task was therefore to produce a statement of reality in the most durable materials at his command. Tombs were decorated with domestic, military, hunting, and ceremonial scenes. Entombed with the deceased were statues of him and of his servants and attendants, often shown at characteristic occupations.
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  • Great Pyramids, Gizeh, Egypt Pyramids of Menkaure, ca. 3,000-2,920 B.C.E.; Khafre, ca. 2520-2494 B.C.E.; Khufu ca. 2551-2528 B.C.E. | Limestone | largest (Khufu) approximately 450 ft. high
  • Great Pyramids, Gizeh, Egypt Pyramids of Menkaure, ca. 3,000-2,920 B.C.E.; Khafre, ca. 2520-2494 B.C.E.; Khufu ca. 2551-2528 B.C.E. | Limestone | largest (Khufu) approximately 450 ft. high The Great Pyramid of Giza is the only pyramid in Egypt known to contain both ascending and descending passages.
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  • http://i8.tinypic.com/5x3z0wg.jpg
  • Great Sphinx, Gizeh, Egypt ca. 2520-2494 B.C.E. | sandstone | approximately 65 ft. high
  • The Great Sphinx of Giza Commonly referred to as the Sphinx, is a statue of a reclining or couchant sphinx (a mythical creature with a lion's body and a human head) that stands on the Giza Plateau on the west bank of the Nile in Giza, Egypt. It is the largest monolith statue in the world, standing 73.5 metres (241 ft) long, 6 metres (20 ft) wide, and 20.22 m (66.34 ft) high. It is the oldest known monumental sculpture, and is commonly believed to have been built by ancient Egyptians of the Old Kingdom during the reign of the pharaoh Khafra (c. 2558–2532 BC). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Sphinx_of_Giza
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  • http://jawbonepig.com/photo/data/media/20/ss-090414-egypt-travel-01_ss_full.jpg
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sphinx_of_Giza_9059.jpg
  • Khafre from Gizeh, Egypt ca. 2,520-2,494 B.C.E. diorite | approximately 66 in. high Statues for eternity As already noted, in Egyptian tombs statues fulfilled an important function. Sculptures created images of the deceased to serve as abodes for the ka should the mummies be destroyed. The primary material for funerary objects was stone.
  • Menkaure and Khamerenebty from Gizeh, Egypt ca. 2,490-2,472 B.C.E. graywacke approximately 54 1/2 in. high
  • Menkaure and Khamerenebty from Gizeh, Egypt ca. 2,490-2,472 B.C.E. graywacke approximately 54 1/2 in. high The timeless quality of the portraits of Khafre, Menkaure, and Khamerernebty is enhanced by the absence of any color but that of the dark natural stone selected for the statues.
  • Seated Scribe from Saqqara, Egypt ca. 2,450-2,350 B.C.E. painted limestone approximately 21 in. high
  • Seated Scribe from Saqqara, Egypt ca. 2,450-2,350 B.C.E. | painted limestone | approximately 21 in. high
  • Ka-Aper from his mastaba at Saqqara, Egypt ca. 2,450-2,350 B.C.E. | wood | approximately 43 in. high A second portrait illustrating the rule of relaxed formality and increased realism is the Fifth Dynasty wooden statue of an official named Ka-Aper.
  • Ti watching hippopotamus hunt from Saqqara, Egypt ca. 2,450-2,350 B.C.E. painted limestone approximately 48 in. high
  • Goats Treading Seed and Cattle Fording a Canal Saqqara, Egypt - Mastaba of Ti | ca. 2450-2350 B.C.E. | painted limestone
  • In reliefs or paintings, frontalism means that the head of the character is always drawn in profile, while the body is seen from the front. Although the face is to the side, the eye is drawn in full. The legs are turned to the same side as the head, with one foot placed in front of the other. The head is at right angles to the body. Every figure, in paintings or sculptures, stands or sits with a formal, stiff, and rigid posture. The stance of the body is severe, but the faces are calm and serene, and almost always tilted slightly towards the sky, as if the figures were basking in the warm sun. Frontalism
  • Rules for Egyptian Wall Painting Rule 1: Profile     Head in profile     Side view of eye and eyebrow     Eye never looks straight ahead Rule 2: Colour     Men painted in red ochre     Women painted in yellow ochre Rule 3: Stance     Hips have a three-quarter turn     Chest and shoulders shown at their full width     Both feet, legs, arms and hands must be shown Rule 4: Scale     Size of figures reflects social status     Men are larger than women of equal status     Wives and children often in crouching position,  with arms around the calves of the father Rule 5: Proportions     Hands and feet are often large compared to  the rest of the body
  • Middle Kingdom Art It was a new age of experiment and invention that grew out of the turbulence of the First Intermediate Period (2185-2055 BC). The forms of the Old era were retained, but the unity of style was broken. Increasing formalism was combined with a meticulous delicacy of craftsmanship. The paintings of the rock-cut tombs at Beni Hasan (e.g., slaves Feeding Oryxes and Cat Stalking) are outstanding for freedom of draftsmanship. In sculpture the sensitive portraits of Senusret 3 and Amenemhet 3 are exceptional in Egyptian art, which at all other times showed a reluctance to portray inner feeling. First obelisks were erected at Heliopolis by Senusret 1 durng this era.
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  • Rock cut Tombs of Beni Hasan Beni Hasan, Egypt, Dynasty XII ca. 1950-1900 B.C.E.
  • Rock cut Tombs of Beni Hasan Beni Hasan, Egypt, Dynasty XII ca. 1950-1900 B.C.E. At Beni Hasan the local nobles during the Middle Kingdom cut large and precise tomb chambers in the limestone cliffs. Architectural features—columns, barrel roofs, and porticoes, all carved from the rock—provided fine settings for painted mural decorations.
  • Source: Fletcher, Banister. A History of Architecture on the Comparative Method. Sixth edition, rewritten and enlarged. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1921, p. 105. Rock cut Tombs of Beni Hasan Beni Hasan, Egypt, Dynasty XII ca. 1950-1900 B.C.E.
  • http://www.biblearchaeology.org/post/2009/09/09/the-beni-hasan-asiatics-and-the-biblical-patriarchs.aspx
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Exterior_view_of_tombs_of_Khety_and_Barquet_III.JPG
  • Interior of rock-cut tomb of Khnumhotep Beni-Hasan, Dynasty XII ca. 1985-1795 BCE http://www.utexas.edu/courses/classicalarch/test1sample.html
  • Close-up Interior of rock-cut tomb of Khnumhotep Beni-Hasan, Dynasty XII ca. 1985-1795 BCE http://egyptsites.wordpress.com/2009/02/14/beni-hasan/
  • A color rendering of the famous Asiatics visiting Egypt (from row 3). A black-and-white rendering of the colored north wall painting of Tomb III (Khnum-Hotep III). http://www.biblearchaeology.org/post/2009/09/09/the-beni-hasan-asiatics-and-the-biblical-patriarchs.aspx
  • Tomb of Meketre, Thebes, Egypt ca. 1,985 B.C.E. The Ancient Egyptian noble Meketre was chancellor and chief steward during the reign of Mentuhotep II and Mentuhotep III, during the Middle Kingdom. His tomb is located in Sheikh Abd el-Qurna, part of the Theban Necropolis contained several wooden replicas, representing the daily activities and life in Ancient Egypt, together with figurines of ships, soldiers and cattle were placed near miniature buildings and gardens.
  • Tomb of Meketre, Thebes, Egypt ca. 1,985 B.C.E.
  • Interior of the Serdab. Tomb of Meketre, Thebes, Egypt ca. 1,985 B.C.E.
  • Model Riverboat from tomb of Meketre, Thebes, Egypt ca. 1,985 B.C.E. | gessoed and painted wood | 50 3/8 in. long
  • Model Granary from tomb of Meketre, Thebes, Egypt ca. 1,985 B.C.E. gessoed & painted wood 29 1/8 in. long
  • Model Weaving Shop Model Carpentry Shop
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  • Statuette of an offering bearer from tomb of Meketre, Thebes, Egypt ca. 1,985 B.C.E. gessoed and painted wood 44 1/8 in. high
  • Hippopotamus from Thebes, Egypt 1991-1783 B.C.E. | faience and ceramic | 7 7/8 in. long
  • Amun depicted with a tall feather crown Amun-Ra
  • Glossary
    • adobe The clay used to make a kind of sun-dried mud brick of the same name; a building made of such brick.
    • amulet An object worn to ward off evil or to aid the wearer.
    • ashlar masonry Carefully cut, regularly shaped blocks of stone used in construction, fitted together without mortar.
  • Glossary
    • ben-ben A pyramidal stone; a fetish of the Egyptian god Re
    • block statue In ancient Egyptian sculpture, a cubic stone image with simplified body parts.
    • canon A rule, for example, of proportion. Beauty was considered a matter of “correct” proportion & sought a canon of proportion, for the human figure & for buildings.
  • Glossary
    • ca no pic jar In ancient Egypt, the container in which the organs of the deceased were placed for later burial with the mummy.
    • capital The uppermost member of a column, serving as a transition from the shaft to the lintel. In classical architecture, the form of the capital varies with the order.
    • chamfer The surface formed by cutting off a corner of a board or post; a bevel.
  • Glossary
    • clerestory The fenestrated part of a building that rises above the roofs of the other parts.
    • colonnade A series or row of columns, usually spanned by lintels.
    • demotic Late Egyptian writing
    • engaged column A half-round column attached to a wall, principally on columns & pilasters.
  • Glossary
    • Egyptian faience A non-clay based ceramic displaying surface vitrification which creates a bright luster of various blue-green colors.
    • flute or fluting Vertical channeling, roughly semicircular in cross-section and used principally on columns and pilasters.
    • hypostyle hall A hall with a roof supported by columns.
  • Glossary
    • fresco Painting on lime plaster, either dry or wet. In the latter method, the pigments are mixed with water and become chemically bound to the freshly laid lime plaster.
    • hieroglyphic A system of writing using symbols or pictures.
    • impost block A stone with the shape of a truncated, inverted pyramid, placed between a capital and the arch that springs from it.
  • Glossary
    • ka In ancient Egypt, the immortal human life force.
    • mastaba An ancient Egyptian rectangular brick or stone structure with sloping sides erected over a subterranean tomb chamber connected with the outside by a shaft.
    • mummification A technique used by ancient Egyptians to preserve human bodies so that they may serve as the eternal home of the immortal ka .
  • Glossary
    • nemes In ancient Egypt, the linen headdress worn by the pharaoh, with the uraeus cobra of kingship on the front.
    • obelisk A tall four-sided narrow tapering monument which ends in a pyramid-like shape at the top, said to resemble a "petrified ray" of the sundisk.
    • papyrus A plant native to Egypt and adjacent lands used to make paperlike writing material; also, the material or any writing on it. used by an artist.
  • Glossary
    • pictograph A picture, usually stylized, that represents an idea; also, writing using such means; also painting on rock.
    • pier A vertical, freestanding masonry support.
    • portico A roofed colonnade; also an entrance porch.
    • pylon The simple and massive gateway, with sloping walls, of an Egyptian temple.
  • Glossary
    • sarcophagus (pl. sarcophagi) Latin, “consumer of flesh.” A coffin, usually of stone.
    • serdab A small concealed chamber in an Egyptian mastaba for the statue of the deceased.
    • sphinx A mythical Egyptian beast with the body of a lion and the head of a human.
    • ushabti In ancient Egypt, a figurine placed in a tomb to act as a servant to the deceased in the afterlife.
  • Sources
    • http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/dsteppyramid2.htm
    • http://www.wadsworth.com/art_d/templates/student_resources/0155050907_kleiner/studyguide/ch03/ch03_2.html
    • http://websites.swlearning.com/cgi-wadsworth/course_products_wp.pl?fid=M20b&product_isbn_issn=0155050907&discipline_number=436
    • http://www.aldokkan.com/art/art.htm