Literary Elements in  Romeo & Juliet English 9B
Quatrain <ul><li>4 line sections in  a sonnet </li></ul><ul><li>Shakespeare’s quatrains have an  </li></ul><ul><li>A </li>...
Couplet <ul><li>2 line concluding section of the sonnet </li></ul><ul><li>Both lines rhyme </li></ul>
Aside <ul><li>an actor’s speech, directed to the audience, that is  not supposed to be heard by other actors  on stage  </...
Soliloquy <ul><li>a character talks about his/her own feelings and thoughts to the audience without addressing any of the ...
Iambic Pentameter <ul><li>The word &quot; iambic &quot; describes the type of foot that is used (in English, an  unstresse...
Foil <ul><li>a character who contrasts with another character (usually the  protagonist ) in order to highlight various fe...
characterization <ul><li>How the author gives information about a character, typically through actions, speech, or thought...
Dramatic Irony <ul><li>When the audience (or reader) knows a fictional character is making a mistake, because the reader h...
Situational irony <ul><li>an outcome that turns out to be very different from what was expected  </li></ul>
Foreshadowing <ul><li>an  author  suggests certain  plot  developments that might come later in the  story .  </li></ul>
oxymoron <ul><li>combines contradictory terms  </li></ul>
Personification <ul><li>giving human traits (qualities, feelings, action, or characteristics) to non-living objects (thing...
allusion <ul><li>figure of speech that makes a reference to a well-known place, event, literary work,  myth , or work of a...
Analogy <ul><li>A kind of extended metaphor or long simile in which an  explicit  comparison is made between two things (e...
Epithet <ul><li>a characterizing word or phrase firmly associated with a person or thing and often used in place of an act...
Simile <ul><li>A comparison made using “like” or “as” </li></ul>
Metaphor <ul><li>A direct comparison that DOES NOT use “like” or “as” </li></ul>
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Literary Terms for Romeo and Juliet

12,866

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
12,866
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
79
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Literary Terms for Romeo and Juliet

  1. 1. Literary Elements in Romeo & Juliet English 9B
  2. 2. Quatrain <ul><li>4 line sections in a sonnet </li></ul><ul><li>Shakespeare’s quatrains have an </li></ul><ul><li>A </li></ul><ul><li>B </li></ul><ul><li>A </li></ul><ul><li>B </li></ul><ul><li>rhyme scheme. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Couplet <ul><li>2 line concluding section of the sonnet </li></ul><ul><li>Both lines rhyme </li></ul>
  4. 4. Aside <ul><li>an actor’s speech, directed to the audience, that is not supposed to be heard by other actors on stage </li></ul><ul><li>used to let the audience know what a character is about to do or what he or she is thinking. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Soliloquy <ul><li>a character talks about his/her own feelings and thoughts to the audience without addressing any of the other characters (typically not on stage w/ character) </li></ul>
  6. 6. Iambic Pentameter <ul><li>The word &quot; iambic &quot; describes the type of foot that is used (in English, an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable). The word &quot;pentameter&quot; indicates that a line has five of these &quot;feet&quot;. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Foil <ul><li>a character who contrasts with another character (usually the protagonist ) in order to highlight various features of that other character's personality, throwing these characteristics into sharper focus. </li></ul>
  8. 8. characterization <ul><li>How the author gives information about a character, typically through actions, speech, or thoughts. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Dramatic Irony <ul><li>When the audience (or reader) knows a fictional character is making a mistake, because the reader has more information than the character. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Situational irony <ul><li>an outcome that turns out to be very different from what was expected </li></ul>
  11. 11. Foreshadowing <ul><li>an author suggests certain plot developments that might come later in the story . </li></ul>
  12. 12. oxymoron <ul><li>combines contradictory terms </li></ul>
  13. 13. Personification <ul><li>giving human traits (qualities, feelings, action, or characteristics) to non-living objects (things, colors, qualities, or ideas). </li></ul>
  14. 14. allusion <ul><li>figure of speech that makes a reference to a well-known place, event, literary work, myth , or work of art </li></ul>
  15. 15. Analogy <ul><li>A kind of extended metaphor or long simile in which an explicit comparison is made between two things (events, ideas, people, etc.) for the purpose of furthering a line of reasoning or drawing an inference </li></ul>
  16. 16. Epithet <ul><li>a characterizing word or phrase firmly associated with a person or thing and often used in place of an actual name or title, such as “man's best friend” for “dog.” </li></ul>
  17. 17. Simile <ul><li>A comparison made using “like” or “as” </li></ul>
  18. 18. Metaphor <ul><li>A direct comparison that DOES NOT use “like” or “as” </li></ul>
  1. ¿Le ha llamado la atención una diapositiva en particular?

    Recortar diapositivas es una manera útil de recopilar información importante para consultarla más tarde.

×