UX Week 2013: The New Me Generation: Behavior Change as Value Proposition

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Design to support behavior change is getting increased exposure as technology has allowed products and services to have a more pervasive role in people’s lives. What impact does the ability to passively collect data and present it back in a meaningful way have in people’s lives?


We are interacting with this data of our everyday lives in new ways. Smart products with personalized intelligence about our behavior help us track how many times we brush our teeth or walk the dog, with the hope we’ll be better at maintaining these habits. Where do these new offerings map on our landscape of products and services? What impact does data have on our behavior? How do data vizualizations amplify persuasion and impact behavior? While more products have an explicit influence on our daily lives, they require you to increasingly relinquish self-determination as a prerequisite for use. How do we design to support behavior change as a value proposition?

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  • 'People don't want a relationship with their data, they want to achieve behavior-based goals.'

    This whole deck is spot-on; thanks for sharing it!
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UX Week 2013: The New Me Generation: Behavior Change as Value Proposition

  1. 1. the new megeneration behavior change as value proposition Chris Risdon @chrisrisdon UX Week 2013
  2. 2. 2004 2004: During a layover you’re sitting at the airport bar having a beer. On the news you see reporting about the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. Your heart goes out. It’s not personal - you don’t know anyone, and it’s halfway around the world. But the story of destruction and loss of life understandably creates sympathy. In the news story there’s a call to action to donate money to the redcross.org. Photo: Robert S. Donovan http://www.flickr.com/photos/10687935@N04/8541178851/
  3. 3. To do this, you may need to take your flight, get home, remember that you wanted to donate, then go through traditional ecommerce funnel, providing billing address and credit card details. Then you also have to think, “how much do I want to donate?” You have to be fairly motivated to follow-through and donate. + call to action $? mental note time passes remember Television by Andy Fuchs, Remember by Connie Chan, Time by Richard de Vos, Thinking by Luis Prado, Credit Card by Hugo Medeiros from The Noun Project get to site billing details how much?
  4. 4. 2010 2010: During a layover you’re sitting at the airport bar having a beer. On the news you see reporting about the 2010 Haiti earthquake. Your heart goes out. It’s not personal - you don’t know anyone, and it’s in another part of the world. But the story understandably creates sympathy. In the news story there’s a call to action to donate money to the Red Cross by texting “Haiti” to 90999. $10 will be added to your phone bill. Photo: Robert S. Donovan http://www.flickr.com/photos/10687935@N04/8541178851/
  5. 5. You pull out your phone there at the bar (it can even be a feature phone), type 90999, and “Haiti”, hit send, and you’re done. No billing, and it’s just $10. And you feel good about helping out. 90999 http://placeit.breezi.com/afed529
  6. 6. • $43 million raised via mobile texting for Haiti relief • Most of these donations were made on impulse An immediate response to media coverage of the disaster, especially on television. • Their interest in Haiti's recovery waned quickly More than half of the donors reported that they did not follow Haitian relief and reconstruction efforts much...since making their donation. • Over half of donors have made text message This means, if they didn’t donate when they saw the story, they likely wouldn’t have donated at all! contributions to other disaster relief efforts This means it’s sustainable new behavior. The Pew Internet and American Life Project
  7. 7. Smart people, like Susan Michie, Professor of Health Psychology at University College London, United Kingdom; or BJ Fogg, who runs the Persuasive Technology Lab at Stanford, have done a great job of modeling what elicits behavior. But we’ve been thinking about this for a while, in a number of different ways. Ensuring that motivated people have a smoother path. It’s at the core of design flows, such as ecommerce check-outs or smart defaults in form design.
  8. 8. Micro Macro Features Conversion Products/Services Behavior Change Previously this was found at the “micro” level -- features designed for conversion, engagement, onboarding, etc. Now, we’re seeing whole products and services—at the macro-level—designed to create sustained behavior change. Or, more accurately, achieve behavior-based outcomes. This is nothing new: from smoking sessasion to losing wait, there have been services like this. But technology has made it more effective.
  9. 9. Processing Connectivity Sensors The closer technology is to us—physically— the more it becomes about us.
  10. 10. Behavior Change as Value Proposition
  11. 11. Behavior Change as Value Proposition Products and services designed and marketed on the premise that their benefits—the value received—are specific behavioral-based outcomes.
  12. 12. Behavior Change as Value Proposition Value proposition is directly related to behavior-based outcome (Rewarding outcomes from persistent behaviors) Data collection is a primary feature System makes prescriptive recommendations or guidance Behavior change, or progress towards outcome is measurable
  13. 13. We now have more direct relationships with products and services. A relationship invites influence.
  14. 14. Forming Habits & Informing Decisions
  15. 15. Let’s say I have a half a box of chocolates open here in front of you. I offer to give you this half box of chocolates now, or I will give you a full box of chocolates in a week. Most people will select the half box of chocolates now. If you ask if they want a half box of chocolates in a year, or a full box in a year and one week, they will be able to think rationally and select the full box. Behavioral Economics
  16. 16. “ Choice Architecture...organizing the context in which people make decisions. ” Nudge Richard Thaler Cass Sunstein
  17. 17. Collection > Communication > Story
  18. 18. Collection > Communication > Story Sensors & Data Framing & Anchors Feedback & Feedforward
  19. 19. If it can be connected, it will be connected.
  20. 20. Feedback and Feedforward
  21. 21. In the 60s most people didn’t have personal scales. If you joined weight watchers, you attended a weekly meeting, where you were weighed and received group therapy style guidance. The feedback loop was one week. You got feedback on all your decisions and behaviors over the course of 7 days at one-week intervals, and received guidance that wasn’t custom for you.
  22. 22. Feedback is still a response after an action—after a decision or behavior has been made. As we get “smarter” with our services, we will present feedforward, guidance at the point of a decisions to engage in a behavior, such as making the right choice on a menu in a fast food restaurant. Feedforward
  23. 23. If I could walk into my nearby sandwich shop for lunch, and be alerted by an app, letting me know the different results, depending on my choice, I might make a different choice. Choice architecture is largely about changing the environment, but it can be about guidance for navigating the environment. 1400 cal soda salami 600 cal cookies turkey water baked
  24. 24. Framing & Anchors How we present feedback, and feedforward has a big effect—one I don’t think we’ve fully tapped yet. The Nike+ Fuelpoints were criticized for being arbitrary. Arbitrary isn’t a problem, as long as it’s consistent.
  25. 25. From your credit score, to your physical activity, there’s a lot of data points to keep track of. Not only do you need to know the relative value (is it good? is it bad?) of each number, but then how each number relates to each other for a complete picture. The average person doesn’t want to do the cognitive “math.” This is where we come in, framing the information, the story, in a way that will elicit reflection and behavioral change. “Math class is tough!”
  26. 26. As mass consumer devices, these devices won’t be about quantified self to the endusers. Data is just a means to an end. People don’t want a relationship with their data, they want to achieve behavior-based goals.
  27. 27. Numbers—arbitrary but consistent 850 Written Document by Thomas Le Bas, Wine by Scott Lewis, from The Noun Project 158.3 2400 100
  28. 28. Numbers—arbitrary but consistent 850 158.3 2400 100 pretty bad 420 50.2 900 82 pretty good 710 104.6 1600 96 Written Document by Thomas Le Bas, Wine by Scott Lewis, from The Noun Project
  29. 29. Numbers—arbitrary but consistent 850 158.3 2400 100 pretty bad 420 50.2 900 82 pretty good 710 104.6 1600 96 Written Document by Thomas Le Bas, Wine by Scott Lewis, from The Noun Project
  30. 30. Habits How do you turn prompted decisions into habits? Basis is great about creating new habits—such as taking a morning “lap” around the block, adding 1,000 steps to your day. When I don’t work out, I’m pretty sedentary during the work day—walking only about 3,000. I create this new habit 2-3 times a day, and I’ve nearly doubled my daily activity.
  31. 31. We’ve created the technology, and we’ve started to understand the psychology, but we are still learning to marry the two together to provide an effective value proposition around services providing a positive behavior-based outcome. Technology Psychology
  32. 32. How smart is smart? Synthesis? Context? Prescriptive Guidance?
  33. 33. 14 days meeting a goal, likely means I’m not setting a high enough goal. It should prompt me to be better.
  34. 34. 14 days meeting a goal, likely means I’m not setting a high enough goal. It should prompt me to be better.
  35. 35. After my two month experiment analyzing all the different trackers, I found it harder than I thought to finally shed them. They all had at least one thing I really wanted. basis up fuelband shine pulse habits haptic prompts aggregate progress score context ecosystem
  36. 36. It’s a two-way dialog. We don’t just want to know what impact our design can have on behavior, but the impact of behavior on our design. “ We should look at what kind of impact people’s behavior should have on design. ” —Paola Antonelli
  37. 37. the new megeneration behavior change as value proposition Thank you!! Chris Risdon @chrisrisdon UX Week 2013

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