Movement for Liveable London Street Talks - Ian Roberts 10th September 2012

6,349 views

Published on

September 2012 Street Talks by Ian Roberts, author of The Energy Glut. Brought to you by Movement for Liveable London -
movementforliveablelondon.com

Published in: Health & Medicine, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
6,349
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5,685
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Health Survey for England
  • Scarce resources are usually conceived as financial costs but can be considered as specific scarce resources including oil or land Transport land use and associated urban sprawl limit availability for other uses, including agriculture. Also associated reduction in social capital. Transport related land use changes are themselves a source of CO2 emissions
  • Passenger cars are resource intensive: opportunity cost- as these resources could be used to improve health. Need to consider the impact of lifecycle resource use and health impacts: vehicle production, use and disposal and infrastructure: associated and dependent industries, including construction, steel, rubber, insurance, advertising and finance. However, there is little research on these health impacts.
  • Movement for Liveable London Street Talks - Ian Roberts 10th September 2012

    1. 1. Energy Glut Ian Roberts
    2. 2. Prevalence of adult obesity in England by gender 1993-2005
    3. 3. “The degree of thinnessexhibited by models chosento promote products is both unachievable and biologically inappropriate. The gap between the idealbody shape and the reality is wider than ever.” British Medical Association Vivian Nathanson called for action.
    4. 4. Trends in waist circumference for women in the USA 1988-94 and 1999-2000YEAR 5th percentile 10th percentile1988-1994 68.0 70.71999-2000 70.5 73.3 Ford et al. Obesity Research (2003) 11, 1223–1231
    5. 5. We are all fat and getting fatter
    6. 6. Heart deaths and BMI in never smokers 16 8 4 2 1 0·5 15 20 25 30 35 40 50 Baseline BMI (kg/m2)Adjusted for age, sex and study; 1st 5 years of follow-up excluded Lancet 2009; 373: 1083-96
    7. 7. Change 4 Life“the way we live in modern society means alot of us, especially our kids, have fallen intounhelpful habits.”“the government is trying to create a lifestylerevolution on a huge scale - something whichno Government has attempted before.”Dawn PrimaroloPublic Health Minister
    8. 8. Something is happening It affects us all It is not our genesIt is not our bad habbits
    9. 9. Prentice A, Jebb SA. BMJ 1995;311:437-439 (12 August) Education and debate Obesity in Britain: gluttony or sloth?The prevalence of clinical obesity in Britain has doubled in thepast decade. It is generally assumed that ready access to highlypalatable foods induces excess consumption and that obesity iscaused by simple gluttony. There is evidence that a high fat dietdoes override normal satiety mechanisms. However, averagerecorded energy intake in Britain has declined substantiallyas obesity rates have escalated. The implication is that levelsof physical activity, and hence energy needs, have declinedeven faster. Evidence suggests that modern inactive lifestylesare at least as important as diet in the etiology of obesity andpossibly represent the dominant factor.
    10. 10. 17
    11. 11. Model T Ford 18
    12. 12. Cars replace trams 19
    13. 13. Exodus to suburbia 20
    14. 14. Car dependent suburbs 21
    15. 15. 22
    16. 16. 23
    17. 17. 24
    18. 18. 25
    19. 19. Body mass index in men and motor gasoline consumption (130 countries, 2005) 35Average body mass index (kg/m2) 25 20 30 0 2 4 6 8 Motor gasoline consumption (logarithm of litres per capita)
    20. 20. Cars are making us fat But how?
    21. 21. The Road to Obesity or the Path to Prevention:Motorized Transportation and Obesity in China A.Colin Bell,* Keyou Ge,† and Barry M. Popkin* Obesity Research (2002) 10, 277–283
    22. 22. Environmental risk factors______________________________________________________________________ Variable Adjusted OR (95%CI)______________________________________________________________________ Traffic volume (vehicles/hr) <250 1.00 250-499 4.52 (2.04 to 9.98) 500-749 7.29 (3.09 to 17.20) >=750 14.30 (6.98 to 29.20) Mean speed (km/hr) <40 1.00 40-49 2.68 (1.26 to 5.69)
    23. 23. Miles travelled by car & motorcycle and pedestrian & cyclist deaths (USA)
    24. 24. What about food?
    25. 25. Health impacts UK Change in disease burden Change in premature deaths Ischaemic heart 10-19% 1950-4240 disease Cerebovascular 10-18% 1190-2580 disease Dementia 7-8% 200-240 Breast cancer 12-13% 200-210Road traffic crashes 19-39% 50-80

    ×