Imagine Cup LTOLT

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Describes my entry for the design invitational of Imagine Cup 2009

Describes my entry for the design invitational of Imagine Cup 2009

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  • A Partially On-line Approach The digital divide is like a huge gap that opens between on-line people and not-on-line people. This gap prevents opportunities from reaching those who could benefit from them and in the process impact positively in their own communities. Surprisingly there is a group of technologies, most of them already in place, known to their intended users, and already working for them, that could be complemented to provide the Internet benefits to below poverty line people. This presentation depicts our idea and design about those technologies.

Transcript

  • 1. A Partially On-line Approach Using technology to bring opportunities to less-than-on-line people around the world
  • 2. Contact Information Leonel Morales Díaz [email_address] [email_address] [email_address]
  • 3. To the reader This presentation was prepared to participate in the Design Competition of Imagine Cup 2009. According to round 1 guide, this presentation depicts a design solution idea in a Microsoft Power Point presentation less than 25 MB in size. The slides are organized linearly and numbered accordingly. There is no hidden content other than slides notes. Also, there are no links to jump to different sections of the presentation to avoid confusions. Animations and automatic transitions were not used to allow self-paced review. Notes were used extensively when needed so a printed copy of the notes pages would be of help while reviewing. Best regards, Leonel Morales Díaz Content is linear Print the notes pages
  • 4.  
  • 5. People and technology ← Desktop Computer ← Laptop ← Cellular Phone -> ← email -> ← Blog ← Social Network ← Smart Phone ← Radio -> On-line people Less-than-on-line people
  • 6. Technology for on-line life
    • On-line tech:
      • High-profile computers and laptops
      • Smart-phones
      • Web 2.0: blogs, social networks, etc.
      • High bandwidth email
        • Huge attachments
      • Radio (digital)
    • Less-than-on-line tech:
      • Analog radio
      • Cellular phones
    • A-little-on-line
      • Less-than-on-line tech plus
      • Low bandwidth email
      • Sporadic Web
  • 7. Less-than-on-line technology
    • Radio and cellular phone (“cel”):
      • A common point with on-liners
      • Widely available
      • Wireless infrastructure
      • Not so expensive
        • Can be very cheap
      • Already integrated
        • Cels have analog radio now
  • 8. Is it a solution?
    • Can we use less-than-on-line technology to bring the on-line opportunities to below poverty line people?
    • Can they benefit from them?
    • Is it a way to integrate them to on-line world?
    • Will the industry be interested?
    • Less-than-on-line technology:
      • LTOLT
  • 9. Design goal
    • Design a device
      • And envision its use
    • Based on LTOLT
    • To bring opportunities on
      • Education
      • Networking
      • Commerce and e-commerce
      • Employment
    • To non-rich, non-techie people
  • 10. What-if…
    • What if there is a cel that:
      • Has a radio
      • Can store radio programs for later listening
      • Has an easy to use interface
    • What if there is a radio station that:
      • Broadcasts education
      • Receives and broadcasts voice messages
      • Allows captioning of programs
  • 11. People could… Listen to any program, any number of times Listen to messages sent by others… … in any order and any times Identify business opportunities by browsing messages and programs Send voice messages to unknown recipients Post comments on heard programs Read captions as they hear
  • 12. Solution overview
    • Merge cel and radio in the same device
    • Add sound storage capabilities
      • To store radio programs
    • Make stations broadcast with markers
      • XML – like
      • Allows radio receptor to:
        • Read tags in the broadcast
        • Couple captions to sounds (if available)
    • Provide a user interface to selectively access contents
  • 13. Mock-up
    • eCel
    A cel with enough memory for storing days of radio programming A docking station with a display and a keyboard
  • 14. The cel in the eCel
    • Can be used standalone
      • Makes and receives calls
      • SMS capable
    • Is also a portable radio
      • Allows to hear any station
    • Stores programs in the background
      • Even if it is turned-off
  • 15. The storage in the eCel
    • Design assumption:
      • Enough memory
    • What would be stored:
      • The radio program the user is listening to
      • Conversations made
      • Tagged radio programs from a particular station
  • 16. Broadcasting user messages
    • Broadcast user messages to encourage networking
    • Two options:
      • SMS – texting
      • Call station number – voice
    • In any case
      • Voice messages are tagged
      • Text messages are voiced
      • All messages are broadcasted
    • Broadcast to air and to the Internet
    I need this… This guy needs… This guy needs… This guy needs…
  • 17. Browsing contents
    • Browsing is easier in the docking station
    • Upon selection, a content piece will
      • Be played or read aloud for the user
        • With commands for stop, repeat, forward, backward, etc.
      • Display its tags along
        • The user can hear and read along
      • Provide options for annotation
        • Voice or text notes
        • Private or public notes
        • Public notes will be broadcasted
  • 18. Annotated contents
    • Voice and text annotated
    • Much like Web 2.0
      • Wikis, blogs, magazine articles, etc.
    • Provide a networking opportunity
  • 19. Make solution attractive
    • Provide appealing content
      • Educational, instructive, cashable
    • Interconnect with the Internet
      • Bring contents from the Internet
      • Take contents to the Internet
      • Involve current cel users
    • Create make-money opportunities
      • Human made speech to text conversions
      • Translations to local languages
      • Buy and sell offers through voice messages
      • Employment
  • 20. Back to design mock-up
    • An Internet cellular phone with a docking station
      • The “eCel” and its dock
    • An eCel is always with owner
      • Storing radio content
        • Programs and messages
    • When docked owner can:
      • Hear favorite programs
        • And comment on them
      • Browse through broadcasted messages
        • And answer to interesting ones
  • 21. Design for use
    • Undocked
      • Call and answer calls like any cel
      • User can listen to radio
    • Docked
      • Browsing contents
        • Content representation
        • Organization
        • Access
        • Capture and update
        • Creation and destruction
        • Acting on content
        • Interaction review
  • 22. Scenarios of use
    • Undocked
      • A cel with a radio
    • Docked
      • Listen to educational programs
      • Reviewing messages
      • Creating and posting content
        • New programs or blogs
        • New messages
        • Communication threads
  • 23. Current LTOLT problems
    • With cels:
      • Bandwidth limited
      • Time based connectivity charges
      • Hard to use texting interfaces
      • Voice communication not easily linked to the Internet
    • With radio:
      • Fixed schedules for programs reduce their impact
      • One shot voice messages
      • Unidirectional in most cases
  • 24. Solving LTOLT problems
    • The eCel
      • Overcomes bandwidth problem:
        • Content comes through radio
      • Cel time is used only for sending own messages
      • User interface redesigned
      • Storing radio content increases its impact
        • For programs and messages
  • 25. The workflow Web page Radio broadcasting station Traditional radio receptor LTOLT user Web 2.0 users Internet user eCel for LTOLT Normal cellular phone user Internet Content to marked-up-voice conversion Audible content originators LTOLT user ISP or TELCO
  • 26. Content generation
    • There are many audible content originators
      • Radio content producer for example
    • Content is marked up and aired
    • It is also made available on-line
    Radio broadcasting station Internet Content to marked-up-voice conversion Audible content originators
  • 27. The eCel function
    • eCel receives and stores content
    • LTOLT users:
      • Access stored content
        • Anytime
      • Make voice-comments on content
      • Post messages through telephone service
    Radio broadcasting station LTOLT user eCel for LTOLT Internet Content to marked-up-voice conversion Audible content originators LTOLT user ISP or TELCO
  • 28. Not on-line users
    • Hear radio programs
    • Call back when interested
    • Post messages through telephone service
    Radio broadcasting station Traditional radio receptor LTOLT user eCel for LTOLT Normal cellular phone user Internet Content to marked-up-voice conversion Audible content originators LTOLT user ISP or TELCO
  • 29. Interacting with other users
    • Web 2.0 users:
      • Access and comment the same content
      • Post new content to be aired
      • Hear or read back responses
    • Can be a full two-way communication
    Radio broadcasting station Traditional radio receptor LTOLT user Web 2.0 users Internet user eCel for LTOLT Normal cellular phone user Internet Content to marked-up-voice conversion Audible content originators LTOLT user ISP or TELCO
  • 30. Web browsing
    • Web pages can be converted to voice
      • Marked up
      • Aired through radio
    • Initially limited to text pages
      • Unpredictable in the future
      • Like anything in the Internet
    Web page Radio broadcasting station Traditional radio receptor LTOLT user Web 2.0 users Internet user eCel for LTOLT Normal cellular phone user Internet Content to marked-up-voice conversion Audible content originators LTOLT user ISP or TELCO
  • 31. Age factors
    • LTOLT and age
      • Kids and teens: highly adoptable
      • Young adults: some how adoptable
      • Mature adults: not likely to adopt
      • Elders: least likely to adopt
    • Most of the impact will occur among kids, teens and young adults
    • Adults and up won’t change their status
  • 32. Skills factors
    • Skills needed to benefit from LTOLT
      • Phone calling
      • Radio listening
      • eCel operation
        • Read and write
    • People without those abilities
      • Will need training
      • Can be trained in schools
  • 33. Skills and age factors People most likely to benefit from LTOLT availability. Most of them have what it takes to impact their community. Demographically this is usually a numerous group in any population. Age Skills
  • 34. Analysis
    • LTOLT will not benefit “all” of our target population
    • The goal is to produce an important benefit to a huge part of that population
      • Kids, teens and young adults
      • Anyone with the skills
    • The other key factor: availability
  • 35. Conclusion
    • LTOLT is not the solution to everyone
    • LTOLT can be important to many
    • LTOLT is about providing opportunities rather than solving the whole problem
    • In some places support technology has to be made available first
      • Cellular phone networks
      • radio stations
  • 36.