Reflected Idealism
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    Reflected Idealism Reflected Idealism Document Transcript

    • Reflected IdealismPage 1 of 3 Reflected Idealism Lindsey PurvesMr.Kabachia Humanities 30-1 November 1, 2011
    • Reflected IdealismPage 2 of 3 Shown in the photograph taken by Elliot Erwitt, the ideal couple is shown reflected in themirror of a vehicle. Most people would agree that this is the picture of a perfect romance, andalthough some say it’s rare nowadays, it can be attained. As with all reflections, we wish to see thatwhat is reflected back at us is perfect; we wish to see we are perfect. Although the couple in thephoto appear to be genuinely happy this is most likely not true, as capturing idealized momentslike this are nearly impossible due to their spontaneous occurrence. Elliot shows the ideal couple in a perfect setting for a romantic moment, reflected in amirror. The way this photo was taken ensures only a reflection is shown, not the actual scene. Bycapturing a reflection we are only shown what Erwitt wants us to see about the idealized romanticcouple, not the true scene. This does not mean that the reflection is a lie, but simply that there ismost likely more to the scene than just what we are shown, perhaps the true feelings of the coupleas they sit in an embrace or a factor that leads to this scene. With all ideals there is always more tothe story than just what we see, or want to see. When we look in the mirror at our reflections we are hoping to see our ideal appearance,whatever that may be. As in the photo the same is said for the ideal romantic couple. Elliot Erwittcaptured a romantic moment that we would like to see reflected back at us. It is perfect down tothe very last detail, seeming almost too-good to be true and yet most would wish this moment weretrue because we hold these ideals in our minds of what the “perfect moment” in a relationshipwould look like. Through his photo he is able to show people this perfect moment, no matter howrare it is to attain. Most appealing to us is the idea of having this perfect romance simply because of the factthat it is so hard to come by. The almost impossible nature of this moment captured in the photomay be acted out, giving us a false picture of the romantic couple. Often times we will act out
    • Reflected IdealismPage 3 of 3idealized scenes because they are just that: idealized scenes. They are nearly too perfect to be truein most cases because in life there is no perfection, and yet we will continues to strive for thisperfection. Ideals can be shown for what they truly are, perfection unattainable to most, or themoment that we strive for and will achieve once in a blue moon. We will try to reflect ideals, but inthe end will not always gain this perfection.