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Web Quest   The Heros Journey
 

Web Quest The Heros Journey

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This is a WebQuest that I worked on for an Education Technology class. Topic: The Hero's Journey and Archetypal Theory.

This is a WebQuest that I worked on for an Education Technology class. Topic: The Hero's Journey and Archetypal Theory.

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    Web Quest   The Heros Journey Web Quest The Heros Journey Presentation Transcript

    • What Makes a Hero? Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for 10 th -12 th Grade Literature Designed by William Jury III [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Picture of Superman courtesy of Wikipedia
    • Incoming Message: URGENT! Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] What makes a hero? This is the question you have been tasked with answering. Edge City, our fine home, has been threatened by a band of evil arch-villains. While the men and women of our brave police force have managed to defeat the villains so far, rumor has it that they are joining forces to plunge Edge City into utter chaos. This cannot happen! Other great cities have their heroes. The citizens of Edge City demand no less. “Without a hero, what will become of us?” they ask. Who will rise to fight against the chaos? Your team must find that person. Remember: What defines a hero? Answer this question, and you will be one step closer to discovering who that hero is. Good luck and God speed. ? Gilgamesh Achilles fighting Hector Luke Skywalker
    • The Task Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] So…this is EdgeMind at EdgeNet. You can call me EM for short. Might I suggest a possible course of action? Yes? Good. According to my data there are 3 of you. Good. A team of 3 is perfect for this project. Link here to see why, but don’t forget to return here – I’ve got more ideas! The Hero’s Journey So…there are 3 of you and 3 stages of the hero’s journey. Since I’m here to assist you, might I suggest that each of you research 1 stage, then together you can present a proposal to the council that identifies the experiences that traditionally define the hero. This will give them some ideas of what to look for in the hero candidates. The Edge City Council will meet with you in 1 week. To prepare for this meeting, your team will need to produce a PowerPoint presentation, an Excel project, and a Publisher document to distribute to the council members. The PowerPoint presentation should chronicle the hero’s journey. The Excel project… And the Publisher document should be a synopsis of the hero’s journey and include your team’s definition of what a hero is. I don’t need to point out that Edge City is your city too. Are you ready? Good. Title Herakles (Hercules) fighting the Amazons.
    • The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] So, we’ve already seen that a hero’s life, or journey, has three distinct stages. Have you decided among yourselves which of you is going to research which stage? Well, that’s the first thing you’ll need to do. Then: Step 1: Each of you will research the stage you have chosen. Here are some links to help you with your research: The Hero’s Journey – A Summary of Steps The Hero’s Journey: Life’s Great Adventure The Hero’s Journey in Star Wars Step 2: Once you’ve collected your research, your team will create a PowerPoint presentation to present your research to the Council. You should outline the Hero’s Journey. Make sure you use at least three examples for each stage (they should be historical heroes, epic heroes, and modern heroes). For an interesting look at modern heroes in comics, movies, and literature check out this link: Myth and the Hero’s Journey: Big Screen and Blockbusters For examples of some of the great heroes of epic literature, check out this link: Wikipedia – Heroes of Epic For an analysis of Odysseus as hero: Odysseus’ Hero’s Journey Step 3: You will also need to create a timeline in Excel that charts the heroic examples you have used in your PowerPoint. Step 4: Finally, you will also need to create a handout for the council members in Publisher. This should include a short reflection for each team member answering the question, “What makes a hero?” Reflect on your research. The handout should also offer a simple definition of a hero. Step 5: You will present your research to the Council.
    • Evaluation Rubric: Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Beginning 2 Developing 3 Accomplished 4 Exemplary 5 Score Research Research drew from few or no sources. The research did not support the group’s arguments, and the topic was not addressed. Research drew from only a few sources, and frequently did not support the group’s' arguments. The topic was not always addressed. Research drew on only one or two sources to support the group’s arguments. The correct topics were addressed most of the time. Research drew on several different sources and supported the group’s arguments. The correct topics were addressed. Teamwork Only a few members did all the work for the group. Some members of the group contributed and participated. Most of the members of the group contributed and participated. All members of the group contributed and participated. Organization Information is not organized. It is difficult to follow and not presented clearly. Information is well organized, but difficult to follow. It is presented clearly. Information is well organized and presented clearly. Information is organized, easy to follow, and clearly presented. Understanding No evidence of understanding the hero’s journey. No new ideas presented, and information is inaccurate. Little evidence of understanding the hero’s journey. No new ideas generated, information is inaccurate. Some evidence of understanding the hero’s journey. New ideas/personal connections seem weak. Clear evidence of understanding the hero’s journey. New ideas/personal connections are generated. Technical Components: PowerPoint, Excel, Publisher Document None of the technical components is completed thoroughly, or two are missing from the final presentation. Only one of the technical components is completed thoroughly, or one is missing from the final presentation. Two out of three of the technical components are complete and thorough, or all three are complete but lack depth. All three technical components are complete and thorough.
    • Conclusion Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Now that you have researched what it means to be a hero, the Edge City Council can find a group of heroes to defend our city alongside each of us. The villains’ plan to destroy Edge City has been thwarted! On behalf of Edge City, I, EM, thank you for your work. We couldn’t have done it without you. Hey, I was thinking…what if your journey is similar to a hero’s journey? Does that make you a hero? Hmm…Well, I’m just an artificial intelligence, so what do I know. Image courtesy of The Government Manual for New Superheroes written by Mathew D. Brozik and Jacob S. Weinstein; published by Andrews McMeel.
    • Credits & References Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] I adapted the rubric from Stephanie Bourden’s Chaucer WebQuest: Chaucer: The Wife of Bath WebQuest This WebQuest is based on a template and training materials from: The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group Image of Gilgamesh: http://www.btinternet.com/~glynhughes/squashed/gilgamesh. htm Image of Herakles fighting the Amazons: http://www.sikyon.com/Thebes/Labors/labor_eg09.html Image of Achilles fighting Hector: http://academic.shu.edu/honors/achilles_hektor2.jpg Image of Superman: http://fixedreference.org/en/20040424/wikipedia/Superman Image of Luke Skywalker: http://www.wiu.edu/users/mudjs1/heropsych. htm Image of Superhero from The Government Manual for New Superheroes : http://www.andrewsmcmeel.com/press_releases/pr_superheros.html
    • What Makes a Hero? Looking at The Hero’s journey (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page A WebQuest for 10 th – 12 th Grade Literature Designed by William Jury III [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
    • Introduction (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson was developed as part of Colorado State University’s Education Technology class. As the saying goes, “Shift happens.” But some things do not change, and learning how to integrate the two – the new and the old – forms the foundation for the rationale of this class. This lesson is designed to teach students the three main stages of the hero’s journey according to the monomyth theory proposed by Joseph Campbell. This relates not only to the study of mythology as a genre but also to literary criticism’s archetypal theory. Since most students (and people) recognize contemporary heroes, such as Superman, the study of heroes as a universal aspect of human literature and experience is both important and beneficial. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Batman and Superman by Alex Ross and Jim Lee; used courtesy of Wikipedia.
    • Learners (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson is anchored in high school language arts and involves social studies to a lesser extent. One of the more advanced English concepts that will be addressed is the literary criticism “Archetypal Theory.“ Given the academic nature of several of the websites, not to mention the theories themselves, it would be appropriate for grades 10-12. Students should be familiar with PowerPoint, Publisher, and Excel. It would also be helpful for students to be familiar with some of the epic heroes and their stories. This, however, can be researched if necessary. Students are not necessarily the only learners here. Teachers should be familiar with Archetypal Theory and Monomyth Theory. They should also familiarize themselves with contemporary superheroes. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
    • Curriculum Standards (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page English Standards Addressed (These are taken from the Colorado Model Content Standards): Standard 1. Students read and understand a variety of materials. Students may use “a full range of strategies to comprehend literary criticism and literary analysis” as an extension of this standard. Archetypal theory is one such literary criticism used in textual analysis. Standard 4. Students apply thinking skills to their reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing. “ As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes…knowing what constitutes literary quality based on elements such as the author's point of view, the author’s selection of significant details, theme development, and the author's reflection of events and ideas of his or her lifetime;” this includes themes relevant to the hero’s journey and myth as a genre. Standard 6. Students read and recognize literature as a record of human experience. Students should be “reading, responding to, and discussing novels, poetry, short stories… plays, essays, and speeches;” from this they should be “developing and supporting a thesis about the craft and significance of particular works of literature, both classic and contemporary, from a variety of ethnic writers”, leading them to an understanding of “the common themes…in world literature”, specifically the theme of the hero’s journey. Additionally, other multidisciplinary standards can be addressed by this WebQuest. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
    • The Process (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Step 1: Students divide into groups of three. Each student will research one of the three stages of the hero’s journey (they will divide these among themselves). Research links: The Hero’s Journey – A Summary of Steps The Hero’s Journey: Life’s Great Adventure The Hero’s Journey in Star Wars Step 2: Once the students have collected their research, they will create a PowerPoint presentation to present to the class (the Council). Their PowerPoint presentation should outline the Hero’s Journey, including at least three examples for each stage (historical heroes, epic heroes, and/or modern heroes). Research Links: Myth and the Hero’s Journey: Big Screen and Blockbusters Wikipedia – Heroes of Epic Odysseus’ Hero’s Journey Step 3: Students will also create a timeline in Excel that charts the heroic examples used in their PowerPoint presentation. Step 4: Finally, students will also create a handout (designed for the council members) in Publisher; this should include a short reflection for each team member answering the question, “What makes a hero?” The handout should also offer a simple definition of a hero. Step 5: Students will present their research to the class (the Council). This lesson will involve more than one class period. I have in mind that it would probably take place over the course of a week as part of a unit on mythology. It could be taught as part of a multidisciplinary project (English, Art, and Social Studies). Students can choose their own groups (this can be a little chaotic, but I’d like to give them that opportunity). A novice teacher should be able to guide student in this unit, so long as they have familiarized themselves with the sources and theories. They should also remember to HAVE FUN! The WebQuest itself provides the script; teachers should just be familiar with it and play along. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
    • Resources (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
      • Students should have access to more than one computer, so computer lab time will be an important resource. Other helpful resources include:
      • The epic of Gilgamesh or the epic of Beowulf.
      • Other epics (abridged or unabridged depending on time or reading ability; videos are acceptable so long as they follow the stages of the hero’s journey).
      • E-mail accounts for all students.
      • Websites that students should have access to include:
      • The Hero’s Journey – A Summary of Steps
      • The Hero’s Journey: Life’s Great Adventure
      • The Hero’s Journey in Star Wars
      • Myth and the Hero’s Journey: Big Screen and Blockbusters
      • Wikipedia – Heroes of Epic
      • Odysseus’ Hero’s Journey
      • Wikipedia - Monomyth
      • This WebQuest is designed to be self-directed, so the teacher can act as a guide. Parent volunteers and aides can definitely play a role as a guide as well, drawing on their own experiences. Reading the Wikipedia entry on Joseph Campbell’s monomyth would provide parents and aides with helpful background information.
      • To tie this WebQuest into a multi-disciplinary unit, here are some ideas:
      • You could coordinate with a Social Studies teacher to present a guest lecture on the history of heroes.
      • You could coordinate with an art teacher to design a superhero. Design elements of the graphic novel could be taught. Scott McCloud’s books are excellent resources for understanding comics.
      Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
    • Evaluation (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page How will you know that this lesson was successful? Describe what student products or performances you'll be looking at and how they'll be evaluated. This, of course, should be tightly related to the standards and objectives you cited above. You may want to just copy and paste the evaluation section of the student page ( Evaluation ) into this space and add any clarifications needed for another teacher to make use of this lesson. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Up to 5 participation points can be awarded to each team at the teacher’s discretion. The total point value for this project is 25. The participation points are extra-credit. Beginning 2 Developing 3 Accomplished 4 Exemplary 5 Score Research Research drew from few or no sources. The research did not support the group’s arguments, and the topic was not addressed. Research drew from only a few sources, and frequently did not support the group’s' arguments. The topic was not always addressed. Research drew on only one or two sources to support the group’s arguments. The correct topics were addressed most of the time. Research drew on several different sources and supported the group’s arguments. The correct topics were addressed. Teamwork Only a few members did all the work for the group. Some members of the group contributed and participated. Most of the members of the group contributed and participated. All members of the group contributed and participated. Organization Information is not organized. It is difficult to follow and not presented clearly. Information is well organized, but difficult to follow. It is presented clearly. Information is well organized and presented clearly. Information is organized, easy to follow, and clearly presented. Understanding No evidence of understanding the hero’s journey. No new ideas presented, and information is inaccurate. Little evidence of understanding the hero’s journey. No new ideas generated, information is inaccurate. Some evidence of understanding the hero’s journey. New ideas/personal connections seem weak. Clear evidence of understanding the hero’s journey. New ideas/personal connections are generated. Technical Components: PowerPoint, Excel, Publisher Document None of the technical components is completed thoroughly, or two are missing from the final presentation. Only one of the technical components is completed thoroughly, or one is missing from the final presentation. Two out of three of the technical components are complete and thorough, or all three are complete but lack depth. All three technical components are complete and thorough.
    • Ideas for the Multidisciplinary Classroom [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page You might want to integrate other content areas into this unit. Since this is a research WebQuest, I envision incorporating a fun exercise: Design your own Superhero! Students would have to come up with a name, costume, and secret identity. Science, Art, and History could be integrated, depending on the group. For example, you can design your own superhero here: Design Your Own Superhero Or use Wikipedia’s Superhero entry. A possible script could be: “ A group of scientists at Edge City Labs have managed to perfect cloning a superhero. What should they look like? What powers should they have? What should their past be? Your team gets to decide!” Don’t forget to let students have fun while they learn. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
    • Conclusion (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page The hero’s journey is an important thematic element found in world literature, both modern and ancient. Everybody wants to their hero emerge victorious. Archetypal theory provides one way in which literature can be viewed and interpreted as a record of human experience, hopes, and dreams. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Image courtesy of The Government Manual for New Superheroes written by Mathew D. Brozik and Jacob S. Weinstein; published by Andrews McMeel.
    • Credits & References (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page List here the sources of any images, music or text that you're using. Provide links back to the original source. Say thanks to anyone who provided resources or help. Websites I adapted the rubric from Stephanie Bourden’s Chaucer WebQuest: Chaucer: The Wife of Bath WebQuest This WebQuest is based on a template and training materials from: The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group Images Gilgamesh: http://www.btinternet.com/~glynhughes/squashed/gilgamesh.htm Herakles fighting the Amazons: http://www.sikyon.com/Thebes/Labors/labor_eg09.html Achilles fighting Hector: http://academic. shu . edu /honors/ achilles _hektor2.jpg Superman: http://fixedreference.org/en/20040424/wikipedia/Superman Luke Skywalker: http://www. wiu . edu /users/mudjs1/ heropsych . htm Superhero graphic from The Government Manual for New Superheroes : http://www. andrewsmcmeel .com/press_releases/pr_ superheros .html Batman and Superman: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superhero References Appleman, D. (2000). Critical Encounter in High School English. New York: Teachers College Press and NCTE. Schmidt, V.L. (2001). 45 Master Characters: Mythic Models for Creating Original Characters. Cincinnati, OH: Writer’s Digest Books. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion