Questioning Techniques to Support Critical Thinking Ulster BOCES Dana Fulmer [email_address] Kathy Simpson [email_address]
What role do questions play? <ul><li>Questioning is the second most popular teaching method (after lecturing) </li></ul><u...
Why do questions matter? <ul><li>The types of questions teachers ask make a difference in student achievement </li></ul><u...
Finding a balance <ul><li>Using a combination of higher and lower order questions is effective, but the balance between th...
Student generated questions <ul><li>Students attain higher levels of thinking when they are encouraged to generate critica...
Student accountability <ul><li>Teachers frequently call on a small group of volunteers to answer questions </li></ul><ul><...
How do we categorize questions? <ul><li>Some examples </li></ul><ul><li>Before, during, after </li></ul><ul><li>Thick and ...
Wait time <ul><li>Wait time 1: Time elapsed after teacher poses a question and before a student speaks </li></ul><ul><li>W...
Research on Wait time <ul><li>Studies beginning in the early 1970s and continuing through the 1980s show that if teachers ...
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Questioning Techniques Overview

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introductory questioning

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  • Questioning Techniques Overview

    1. 1. Questioning Techniques to Support Critical Thinking Ulster BOCES Dana Fulmer [email_address] Kathy Simpson [email_address]
    2. 2. What role do questions play? <ul><li>Questioning is the second most popular teaching method (after lecturing) </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers spend 35% to 50% of the time on questions. </li></ul><ul><li>Students whom teachers perceive as slow or poor learners are asked fewer higher cognitive questions than students perceived as more capable learners. </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers develop questioning patterns </li></ul><ul><li>over time (number and types) </li></ul><ul><li>--Marzano, 2003 </li></ul>
    3. 3. Why do questions matter? <ul><li>The types of questions teachers ask make a difference in student achievement </li></ul><ul><li>Lessons that incorporate questions are more effective in raising achievement than lessons which do not </li></ul><ul><li>Asking good questions fosters interaction between teacher and students </li></ul>
    4. 4. Finding a balance <ul><li>Using a combination of higher and lower order questions is effective, but the balance between the two types of questions depends on the specific needs of students. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gall 1984; Wilen, 1991; Arends, 1994 </li></ul></ul>
    5. 5. Student generated questions <ul><li>Students attain higher levels of thinking when they are encouraged to generate critical and creative questions and when they use these with their peers. </li></ul><ul><li>Students ask very few content-related questions. </li></ul>
    6. 6. Student accountability <ul><li>Teachers frequently call on a small group of volunteers to answer questions </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers often accept incorrect answers without probing; teachers frequently answer their own questions </li></ul><ul><li>Students who regularly ask and answer questions do better on achievement tests. </li></ul><ul><li>--Walsh and Sattes, 2005 </li></ul>
    7. 7. How do we categorize questions? <ul><li>Some examples </li></ul><ul><li>Before, during, after </li></ul><ul><li>Thick and thin </li></ul><ul><li>Bloom’s Taxonomy </li></ul><ul><li>Factual, Interpretive, Evaluative (Junior Great Books) </li></ul>
    8. 8. Wait time <ul><li>Wait time 1: Time elapsed after teacher poses a question and before a student speaks </li></ul><ul><li>Wait time 2: Amount of time elapsed after a student speaks before teacher (or another student) speaks </li></ul>
    9. 9. Research on Wait time <ul><li>Studies beginning in the early 1970s and continuing through the 1980s show that if teachers pause between three and seven seconds after asking higher-level questions, students respond with more thoughtful answers (Students are typically given 1 second to respond to questions.) </li></ul>
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