Scotland's Curriculum for Excellence and the New Literacy
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Scotland's Curriculum for Excellence and the New Literacy

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A look at how Scotland's curriculum review has re-defined the meaning of text and what it means for the development of literacy in the 21st century.

A look at how Scotland's curriculum review has re-defined the meaning of text and what it means for the development of literacy in the 21st century.

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  • The key difference is that the focus of the new curriculum is on experiences and outcomes rather than inputs ie what is to be taught. This is not to say that inputs are no longer important but the emphasis has shifted to the learner and what has been learned.
  • These are the four expressly stated purposes of education in Curriculum for Excellence. Everyone is now familiar with these, but we need to remind ourselves of the attributes and abilities required before we can describe an individual as any of these things. Each of them was more closely defined as follows.
  • This is how they appear in the original review document.
  • Having defined the four purposes of education, the next stage was to produce a framework of the experiences and outcomes at each stage for each of the 8 curriculum areas – Health and Wellbeing, Languages, Expressive Arts, Social Studies, Science, Technologies, Mathematics and RME (Religious and Moral Education).
  • Literacy had to be re-defined for the 21 st Century. The forms of language which society values and finds useful changes through time.
  • Literacy skills are embedded in the experiences and outcomes for every curriculum area, and the literacy experiences and outcomes themselves are the responsibility of all teachers. This can be challenging to some secondary teachers.
  • Only country to include listening and talking – future proof definition. The forms of communication which society values changes with time. Story telling and narrating important way in which news was received in medieval times. 19 th century – well crafted letter/ Age of leisure–long books because people had fewer distractions competing for leisure time. Now well-crafted e-mail. Importance of using an appropriate register to meet the formality requirements of a situation.
  • This responsibility is not new however. This statement has been part of the General Teaching Council’s Standard for Full Registration for secondary teachers for a number of years.
  • Only country to include listening and talking – future proof definition. The forms of communication which society values changes with time. Crucial to the promotion of literacy as the responsibility of all is that all teachers (and learners) understand what is meant by text. It does not refer to a short written message sent by phone – although that is one form of text – nor does it mean a text book in the traditional sense. Rather it covers the whole range of media through which we communicate.
  • These are the different kinds of text which are given in the document by way of illustration. Here they are presented as a “wordle” or graphic representation. The Wordle is of course a text in its own right, and people have already found multiple uses for wordles in the classroom.
  • Other kinds of texts might include blogs, wikis and podcasts. These are particularly effective in motivating young people and engaging them in active learning, a key aim of Curriculum for Excellence. They are also a few of the ways in which young people (and people generally) can reach a wider audience and receive feedback on their work, not only from their peers but literally from around the world.
  • Two of the capabilities listed earlier in the definition of successful learners were “able to think creatively and independently” and “able to make reasoned evaluations.” This outcome for learners at Level 3 (age 12-14 approximately) reflects these. When most people now look for information primarily online, it is vital that young people learn to make informed judgements as early as possible.
  • A search for “information literacy” on Wikipedia reveals the complexity of the subject but also reflects its importance.
  • This is a useful definition of “information literacy” even if they haven’t heard of the word NECESSARY!
  • So does the internet mean the end of reading as we know it?
  • Absolutely not. What it means is that there will be a greater choice of formats. There is no evidence to suggest that reading for leisure is becoming less popular.
  • Some e-books are now available with added “rich media” – video, pictures, music and games.
  • New technologies such as Twitter are changing the way we communicate with each other.
  • This is an application called “Tweetdeck” which allows you to manage your real-time conversations or “tweets” which is the commonly used term for updates. The updates are 140 characters maximum and are generally in response to the question, “What are you doing?” In reality they are much more than that, providing immediate answers to puzzles, offering links to useful websites and materials, and making it easy to build effective professional networks.
  • A quick test.
  • And for those who may be a bit more advanced!
  • Everything related to Scotland’s new curriculum can be found here.

Scotland's Curriculum for Excellence and the New Literacy Scotland's Curriculum for Excellence and the New Literacy Presentation Transcript

  • Scotland’s Curriculum for Excellence and The New Literacy Photo by Cristobal Cobo Romani
  • “ This is a different kind of development from anything we have had before. It depends on reflective professionals developing their own thinking and teaching, and working collaboratively. It does not depend on a rollout of a specific curriculum with teachers having to become familiar with completely new material.” Curriculum for Excellence Management Board, June 2008
  • successful learners confident individuals responsible citizens effective contributors To enable all young people to become A Curriculum for Excellence
    • successful learners
    • with
    • enthusiasm and motivation for learning
    • determination to reach high standards of achievement
    • openness to new thinking and ideas
    • and able to
    • use literacy, communication and numeracy skills
    • use technology for learning
    • think creatively and independently
    • learn independently and as part of a group
    • make reasoned evaluations
    • link and apply different kinds of learning in
    • new situations
    • confident individuals
    • with
    • self respect
    • a sense of physical, mental and emotional wellbeing
    • secure values and beliefs
    • ambition
    • and able to
    • relate to others and manage themselves
    • pursue a healthy and active lifestyle
    • be self aware
    • develop and communicate their own beliefs
    • and view of the world
    • live as independently as they can
    • assess risk and take informed decisions
    • achieve success in different areas of activity
    • responsible citizens
    • with
    • respect for others
    • commitment to participate responsibly in
    • political, economic, social and cultural life
    • and able to
    • develop knowledge and understanding of
    • the world and Scotland’s place in it
    • understand different beliefs and cultures
    • make informed choices and decisions
    • evaluate environmental, scientific and
    • technological issues
    • develop informed, ethical views of complex
    • issues
    • effective contributors
    • with
    • an enterprising attitude
    • resilience
    • self-reliance
    • and able to
    • communicate in different ways and in
    • different settings
    • work in partnership and in teams
    • take the initiative and lead
    • apply critical thinking in new contexts
    • create and develop
    • solve problems
    To enable all young people to become
  • with enthusiasm and motivation for learning determination to reach high standards of achievement openness to new thinking and ideas and able to use literacy, communication and numeracy skills use technology for learning think creatively and independently learn independently and as part of a group make reasoned evaluations link and apply different kinds of learning in new situations successful learners
  • confident individuals with self respect a sense of physical, mental and emotional wellbeing secure values and beliefs ambition and able to relate to others and manage themselves pursue a healthy and active lifestyle be self aware develop and communicate their own beliefs and view of the world live as independently as they can assess risk and take informed decisions achieve success in different areas of activity
  • responsible citizens with respect for others commitment to participate responsibly in political, economic, social and cultural life and able to develop knowledge and understanding of the world and Scotland’s place in it understand different beliefs and cultures make informed choices and decisions evaluate environmental, scientific and technological issues develop informed, ethical views of complex issues
  • effective contributors with an enterprising attitude resilience self-reliance and able to communicate in different ways and in different settings work in partnership and in teams take the initiative and lead apply critical thinking in new contexts create and develop solve problems
  •  
  • Definition of literacy
    • “ Literacy is the set of skills which allows an individual to engage fully in society and in learning, through the different forms of language which society values and finds useful.”
    • Literacy and English Principles and Practice 2009
  • Definition of literacy
    • “ The literacy experiences and outcomes apply across the curriculum, in all aspects of learning and all subject areas.”
    • Literacy and English Principles and Practice 2009
  • Definition of literacy
    • “ All practitioners in each sector, in each department and in all settings therefore have a responsibility to develop, reinforce and extend the skills which are set out in the literacy experiences and outcomes.”
    • Literacy and English Principles and Practice 2009
  • GTC Standard for Full Registration
  • Definition of Texts
    • “ a text is the medium through which ideas, experiences, opinions and information can be communicated”
    • Literacy and English Principles and Practice 2009
  • www.wordle.com
  • Not to Mention Blogs, Wikis and Podcasts
  • Critical Literacy in the Digital Age
    • To help me develop an informed view, I am exploring the techniques used to influence my opinion. I can recognise persuasion and assess the reliability of information and credibility and value of my resources.
            • Literacy Level 3
  •  
  • Information Literacy
    • “ To be information literate a person must be able to recognise when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate and use effectively the needed information.”
    • The American Library Association
  • So we how read the does way change internet the?
  • Digital Media – The Death of the Book? Rachael Nicholl, Dundonald Primary School
    • E-reader
    • 160+ books
    • auto-find last page
    • paper-like screen
    • keyword search
    • rich media content
  •  
  • Reading Pictures 1
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  •  
  • Reading Pictures (2)
  •  
  •  
  • www.scribd.com
  •  
  • The Future: Web 2.0 How Many Tools Do You Recognise?
  •  
  • Barriers to Progress
    • Exams
    • Bad Internet
    • Numbers
    • Schools
    • Fear
    Photo by Niklas Plutte
  • www.LTScotland.org.uk
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