March 29 Eng 202

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March 29 Eng 202

  1. 1. ENGL 202 <br />March 31st 2010<br />
  2. 2. An event:<br />Wrong Place, Wrong Time: Trauma and Violence in the Lives of Young Black Men”presented by Dr. John A. Rich, M.D., M.P.H, MacArthur Grant recipient, author, and professor in the Drexel University School of Public Health<br />Tuesday, April 6, 2010 at 7:00 p.m. in the Eberly Auditorium<br />Going over literature reviews.<br />Quoting, summarizing, paraphrasing (OWL’s Writing lab)<br />Blogging and I-SEARCH.<br />Writing at the University Chapter 6 and 8<br />Assignments<br />Agenda<br />
  3. 3. Do not leave your quotes alone (orphan quotes). Always, integrate them into your writing.<br />Check the quotations against the original texts for accuracy.<br />Make sure that your voice is distinct from those in your sources.<br />If you have copied phrases of more than two words from the original, put them in quotation marks or change them into your own words<br />Paste your “References” or “Works Cited” list to the end of your social action research projects.<br />Make sure you use every item in your reference list.<br />Remember that you need at least 9-10 sources.<br />Global Feedback about your Quotations<br />
  4. 4. In conclusion, these students are not receiving the educational opportunities that they need to succeed or learn.<br />Be specific with your pronouns<br />
  5. 5. According to Peter Singer, a professor at Princeton University, “people buying organic food want to avoid unnecessary risks, and they believe that more natural methods of producing food are likely to be healthier.”<br />For direct quotations, Include page numbers .<br />
  6. 6. Make sure that you have scholarly articles<br />It is not acceptable to base all of your review on online sources<br />Make sure that you include page numbers if you do direct quotations.<br />Do not leave quotations alone.<br />Sources<br />
  7. 7. Quotations must be identical to the original, using a narrow segment of the source. They must match the source document word for word and must be attributed to the original author. Include exact page numbers.<br />Paraphrasing involves putting a passage from source material into your own words. Here you can use first personal pronoun “I” A paraphrase must also be attributed to the original source. Paraphrased material is usually shorter than the original passage, taking a somewhat broader segment of the source and condensing it slightly. No need to include the page number, but include the name of the author, and the date of the publication.<br />Summarizing involves putting the main idea(s) into your own words, including only the main point(s). Once again, it is necessary to attribute summarized ideas to the original source. Summaries are significantly shorter than the original and take a broad overview of the source material. You need to include summaries of each resource. DO NOT COPY WORD BY WORD. IF YOU DO COPY WORD BY WORD AND DO NOT GIVE CREDIT TO THE AUTHORS, IT IS CONSIDERED AS “PLAGIARISM”<br />Adapted from : http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/563/01/<br />Differences among quotations, paraphrasing and sumamrizing<br />
  8. 8. Provide support for claims or add credibility to your writing <br />Refer to work that leads up to the work you are now doing <br />Call attention to a position that you wish to agree or disagree with <br />Highlight a particularly striking phrase, sentence, or passage by quoting the original. There needs to be a good reason that you’re citing a particular sentence.<br />Distance yourself from the original by quoting it in order to cue readers that the words are not your own <br />Expand the breadth or depth of your writing <br />Why do we use quotations and summaries?<br />
  9. 9. Reread the original passage until you understand its full meaning. <br />Set the original aside, and write your paraphrase on a note card. <br />Jot down a few words below your paraphrase to remind you later how you envision using this material. At the top of the note card, write a key word or phrase to indicate the subject of your paraphrase. <br />Check your rendition with the original to make sure that your version accurately expresses all the essential information in a new form. <br />Use quotation marks to identify any unique term or phraseology you have borrowed exactly from the source. <br />Record the source (including the page) on your note card so that you can credit it easily if you decide to incorporate the material into your paper. <br />6 Steps to Effective Paraphrasing<br />
  10. 10. Students frequently overuse direct quotation in taking notes, and as a result they overuse quotations in the final [research] paper. Probably only about 10% of your final manuscript should appear as directly quoted matter. Therefore, you should strive to limit the amount of exact transcribing of source materials while taking notes. Lester, James D. Writing Research Papers. 2nd ed. (1976): 46-47.<br />Paraphrase this original passage:<br />
  11. 11. In research papers students often quote excessively, failing to keep quoted material down to a desirable level. Since the problem usually originates during note taking, it is essential to minimize the material recorded verbatim (Lester 46-47).<br />A legitimate paraphrase:<br />
  12. 12. Students should take just a few notes in direct quotation from sources to help minimize the amount of quoted material in a research paper (Lester 46-47).<br />An acceptable summary:<br />
  13. 13. Students often use too many direct quotations when they take notes, resulting in too many of them in the final research paper. In fact, probably only about 10% of the final copy should consist of directly quoted material. So it is important to limit the amount of source material copied while taking notes.<br />(This is the original version)<br />Students frequently overuse direct quotation in taking notes, and as a result they overuse quotations in the final [research] paper. Probably only about 10% of your final manuscript should appear as directly quoted matter. Therefore, you should strive to limit the amount of exact transcribing of source materials while taking notes. Lester, James D. Writing Research Papers. 2nd ed. (1976): 46-47.<br />A plagiarized version:<br />
  14. 14. PUTTING YOURSELF IN YOUR ACADEMIC WRITING<br />
  15. 15. In this BLOG entry, you are going to reflect on your research experiences from the day you began searching your research questions until now (data collection).<br />This is a personal narrative that describes the process of your research with a focus on the way your understanding of the problem and you social action research developed.<br />Tell the story of your research: What did you do to find this topic? Why is it important to you? What type of sources did you find? How did your views change after reading sources? What type of research methodology are you using to investigate your social action project? What rewards and challenges have you encountered so far?<br />I-SERACH: Blogging on your research process<br />
  16. 16. Activity 33: Writing from a personal perspective<br />Activity34: The writer’s place in personal academic writing.<br />Writing at the university<br />
  17. 17. Continue your data collection<br />Bring your literature reviews with you (both the electronic versions and the feedback you received from me).<br />We will meet at the writing center on Wednesday for MLA/APA tutoring. You will also have a chance to work with a tutor to go over your literature reviews.<br />Book Discussion for next week: Covering(INTRO AND CH.1). Go to e-reserve to access the readings. Password: selengl202<br />Assignments<br />

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