0
ICOMPUTE
E-SAFETY
E-SAFETY: RISKS
What were your placement issues for e-safety?
-School Management
-Pupils
-Teachers
WORDLE
The 3 ‘C’s
Half (49%) of young people questioned say they have
given out personal information, such as their full names,
ages, email ...
CONTACT
CEOP - Child exploitation and online protection
Childnet International
Watch CEOP film ‘Jigsaw’
Jigsaw – Discussion Points
How could children behave differently
online to offline?
How could they put themselves at risk?...
CONTENT
Inappropriate - How would you
respond?
Inaccurate - How do you know?
Plagiarism/Copyright
User generated - “Produs...
COMMERCIALISM
E-commerce
Privacy
Junk/Spam
premium rates
RESEARCH &
REPORTS
The Byron Review
UK Kids Go Online
Ethical issues for schools
WHAT CHILDREN SAY
“Kids don’t need protection we need guidance.
If you protect us you are making us weaker.
We don’t go th...
BEING PROACTIVE
VIRTUAL LEARNING
ENVIRONMENTS
Online collaboration in ‘Safe’
environments
TEACHING
PRACTICE?
• Whose responsibility is it to tackle issues of e-safety? (Parents
Teacher? Whole school?)
• How do we...
PROFESSIONAL
VS PERSONAL LIFE
Ofsted – ICT Subject Guidance
USEFUL RESOURCES
• CEOP - Child exploitation and online protection
http://www.ceop.police.uk
• Childnet International
http...
REFERENCES
Byron,T. (2008) Safer Children in a Digital World: Report ofThe Byron Review,
Available: http://www.dcsf.gov.uk...
DIGITAL
LITERACIES
Computing - Purpose of study
A high-quality computing education equips
pupils to use computational thinking and
creativity...
Computing – Aims
The national curriculum for computing
aims to ensure that all pupils:
can understand and apply the
fundam...
Activity: Create a guide to Brighton or a city of your choice.
•Work in pairs and agree on your location and the web resou...
SHOWTIME
FOLLOW UP TASK:
•
Engage:
What e-safety resources can you find to
support teachers or children? Collect your
ideas and add...
Ei607 Session 5
Ei607 Session 5
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Ei607 Session 5

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  • Students share experiences
  • In discussion the above issues are often mentioned.
  • Reflect on the Wordle. Was there anything missing?
    REMEMBER – the thrust of the message is that the two main issues are grooming and cyber bullying
    CONTACT
    Contact from someone online who may wish to bully or abuse the child. Activities of a commercial nature include tracking and harvesting personal information. Children may be bullied, harassed or stalked. They might be tempted to meet strangers or be subjected to grooming or unwelcome persuasions. They may self-harm.
    CONTENT
    Inappropriate material available to children online include: adverts, spam, sponsorship, personal info, violent or hateful content, pornographic or unwelcome sexual content, biased materials, racist materials, misleading information or advice…
    CONDUCT
    The child may be the perpetrator of the wrong activities including: illegal downloading, hacking, gambling, financial scams, terrorism, bullying or harassing another pupil. They might create and upload inappropriate material or provide misleading information or advice. These activities might place them in a vulnerable position.
  • UK Children Go Online Economic and Social Research Council, 2005
    Your Safety Net London, UK: Association of Teachers and Lecturers, 2002
Signposts to safety, Becta (2004)E-safety: the experience in English educational establishments, Becta (2005)
    E-safety; Developing Whole-School Policies to Support Effective Practice, Becta (2006)
  • Jigsaw
    Film aimed at children aged 8 to 10
    The film Jigsaw is a story about a young girl called Becky who likes to use social networking sites. She has her own profile where she shares information like the things she enjoys and photos of herself and her friends.
    Becky has been talking to somebody who she believes to be another child. It turns out to be a man who has lied to her.
    This 10 minute film shows that when you talk to people online and tell them too much about yourself, you might as well be inviting them through your front door.
    Watch Jenny’s story and explore the issues. (Open learning centre http://www.childnet.com/jenny/index.html) Find out about the CEOP button. Consider how children can put each other at risk, as in Jenny’s story. Consider what circumstantial factors heighten children’s vulnerability?
  • Jigsaw
    Film aimed at children aged 8 to 10
    The film Jigsaw is a story about a young girl called Becky who likes to use social networking sites. She has her own profile where she shares information like the things she enjoys and photos of herself and her friends.
    Becky has been talking to somebody who she believes to be another child. It turns out to be a man who has lied to her.
    This 10 minute film shows that when you talk to people online and tell them too much about yourself, you might as well be inviting them through your front door.
    Watch Jenny’s story and explore the issues. (Open learning centre http://www.childnet.com/jenny/index.html) Find out about the CEOP button. Consider how children can put each other at risk, as in Jenny’s story. Consider what circumstantial factors heighten children’s vulnerability?
  • Explore the links in this slide. What knowledge, understanding and skills do children need to be able to critically evaluate inappropriate or inaccurate content? How would you respond in the classroom to the inappropriate content on the Martin Luther King website?
  • Consider how children and young people are particularly vulnerable to commercial exploitation online. Back end databases harvesting information.
  • On Student Central
  • To achieve outstanding schools must…
    http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/filedownloading/?file=documents/inspection--forms-and-guides/supplementary_subject_specific_guidance/Supplementary%20subject-specific%20guidance%20for%20ICT.pdf&refer=1
  • Explain that this is a requirement for KS1 and KS2 and draw students attention to the text that focuses on digital literacy. Note that whilst it doesn’t have as much weight as Computing, it is still a requirement and something that lends itself to cross curricular outcomes.
  • Again, note the many elements that are associated with digital literacy. It’s not simple about children using digital tools, its about being evaluative, confident, analytical, creative and responsible users of technology (amongst other things that we will go on to consider).
  • What is Popcorn Maker?
    Popcorn Maker helps you easily remix web video, audio and images into cool mashups that you can embed on other websites. Drag and drop content from the web, then add your own comments and links —all within your browser. Popcorn Maker videos are dynamic, full of links and unique with every view.
    You can build:
    an animated gif with sound
    a documentary with dynamic links
    a video profile to introduce yourself to the world
    and more!
  • You can build:
    an animated gif with sound
    a documentary with dynamic links
    a video profile
    Stress the need to identify the digital literacies that will be developed through this activity, drawing upon Doug Belshaw’s 8 elements. Time will be tight in this session which is why we have chosen to use a tool that is relatively simple and quick to use. Read through the slide and ensure students return with enough time to show their films.
  • Ask the students to share their resources
    Discuss how they’ve developed their essential digital literacy elements.
    15mins
  • Transcript of "Ei607 Session 5"

    1. 1. ICOMPUTE
    2. 2. E-SAFETY
    3. 3. E-SAFETY: RISKS What were your placement issues for e-safety? -School Management -Pupils -Teachers
    4. 4. WORDLE
    5. 5. The 3 ‘C’s
    6. 6. Half (49%) of young people questioned say they have given out personal information, such as their full names, ages, email addresses, phone numbers, hobbies or names of their schools, to someone they met on the internet. By contrast, only 5% of parents think their child has given out such information. (Source: UK Children Go Online.) Prior to the launch of the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP), there was no centralised collection of details of internet-related abuse in the UK, and not all victims reported incidents. THE NEED FOR E-SAFETY
    7. 7. CONTACT CEOP - Child exploitation and online protection Childnet International Watch CEOP film ‘Jigsaw’
    8. 8. Jigsaw – Discussion Points How could children behave differently online to offline? How could they put themselves at risk? Other than engaging with strangers, what are the other risks of being online? What advice would you give children to help them keep safe?
    9. 9. CONTENT Inappropriate - How would you respond? Inaccurate - How do you know? Plagiarism/Copyright User generated - “Produsers”
    10. 10. COMMERCIALISM E-commerce Privacy Junk/Spam premium rates
    11. 11. RESEARCH & REPORTS The Byron Review UK Kids Go Online Ethical issues for schools
    12. 12. WHAT CHILDREN SAY “Kids don’t need protection we need guidance. If you protect us you are making us weaker. We don’t go through all the trial and error necessary to learn what we need to survive on our own… don’t fight our battles for us just give us assistance when we need it.” Byron Review, 2009
    13. 13. BEING PROACTIVE
    14. 14. VIRTUAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS Online collaboration in ‘Safe’ environments
    15. 15. TEACHING PRACTICE? • Whose responsibility is it to tackle issues of e-safety? (Parents Teacher? Whole school?) • How do we address the issues through our practice? • Responding to incidents • Pre-emptive approaches • School policy – Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) • Your own professional conduct • Confidentiality of pupil information • Your personal/professional online presence
    16. 16. PROFESSIONAL VS PERSONAL LIFE
    17. 17. Ofsted – ICT Subject Guidance
    18. 18. USEFUL RESOURCES • CEOP - Child exploitation and online protection http://www.ceop.police.uk • Childnet International http://www.childnet-int.org/ • Thinkuknow resources for children of all ages as well as for parents/carers and teachers) http://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/ • Kidsmart (resources for young children) http://www.kidsmart.org.uk • Jenny’s Story DVD (an Internet safety resource for KS3) http://www.childnet-int.org/jenny/index.html • KnowITall for trainee teachers http://www.childnet-int.org/kia/traineeteachers/
    19. 19. REFERENCES Byron,T. (2008) Safer Children in a Digital World: Report ofThe Byron Review, Available: http://www.dcsf.gov.uk/byronreview/pdfs/Final%20Report %20Bookmarked.pdf Child Exploitation & Online Protection Centre CEOP - http://www.ceop.police.uk/ Chilnet International - http://www.childnet-int.org/ Livingstone, S. & Bober, M (2005) UK Kids Go Online, London: LSE, available: http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/children-go-online/ Turvey, K. (2006)The ethical challenges of researching primary school children’s online activities:A new ethical paradigm for the virtual ethnographer? British Educational Research Association, BERA,Available online www.leeds.ac.uk/educol/documents/157434.htm
    20. 20. DIGITAL LITERACIES
    21. 21. Computing - Purpose of study A high-quality computing education equips pupils to use computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world. Computing has deep links with mathematics, science and design and technology, and provides insights into both natural and artificial systems. The core of computing is computer science, in which pupils are taught the principles of information and computation, how digital systems work and how to put this knowledge to use through programming. Building on this knowledge and understanding, pupils are equipped to use information technology to create programs, systems and a range of content. Computing also ensures that pupils become digitally literate – able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through, information and communication technology – at a level suitable for the future workplace and as active participants in a digital world.
    22. 22. Computing – Aims The national curriculum for computing aims to ensure that all pupils: can understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems are responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology
    23. 23. Activity: Create a guide to Brighton or a city of your choice. •Work in pairs and agree on your location and the web resources you might draw upon •Again working together, create a quick and simple storyboard for your resource. It isn’t necessary to be a great artist to produce a good storyboard. •Consider which digital literacies you are going to develop during your film making. •Aim to create a resource that is approx 1 – 2 mins •Come back ready to show your popcorn films.
    24. 24. SHOWTIME
    25. 25. FOLLOW UP TASK: • Engage: What e-safety resources can you find to support teachers or children? Collect your ideas and add them to the group google doc.
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