Preparing For The Future: Helping Libraries Respond to Changing Technological, Economic and Political Change
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Preparing For The Future: Helping Libraries Respond to Changing Technological, Economic and Political Change

on

  • 3,914 views

Slides for a workshop on "Preparing For The Future: Helping Libraries Respond to Changing Technological, Economic and Political Change" given by Brian Kelly, UKOLN at a staff development workshop at ...

Slides for a workshop on "Preparing For The Future: Helping Libraries Respond to Changing Technological, Economic and Political Change" given by Brian Kelly, UKOLN at a staff development workshop at the University of York on 4 July 2013.

See http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/web-focus/events/workshops/york-library-2013/
.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,914
Views on SlideShare
1,398
Embed Views
2,516

Actions

Likes
2
Downloads
3
Comments
0

19 Embeds 2,516

http://ukwebfocus.wordpress.com 2269
http://lonewolflibrarian.wordpress.com 76
http://www.ukoln.ac.uk 72
http://planeta.wikispaces.com 27
http://themodernmlis.wordpress.com 20
https://ukwebfocus.wordpress.com 13
http://translate.googleusercontent.com 8
http://cloud.feedly.com 7
http://www.library.ceu.hu 6
http://fr.flavors.me 5
http://www.newsblur.com 3
http://prlog.ru 2
http://www.365dailyjournal.com 2
http://imgserve.net 1
http://web.arch.org.tw 1
http://infophile.ca 1
http://www.feedspot.com 1
http://www.inoreader.com 1
http://forums.t25.us 1
More...

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

CC Attribution License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Preparing For The Future: Helping Libraries Respond to Changing Technological, Economic and Political Change Preparing For The Future: Helping Libraries Respond to Changing Technological, Economic and Political Change Presentation Transcript

  • Preparing For The Future: Helping Libraries Respond to Changing Technological, Economic and Political Change Making Sense of the Future Presentation by Brian Kelly, UKOLN at the ILI 2012 conference 1 Brian Kelly, UKOLN
  • A centre of expertise in digital information management www.ukoln.ac.uk http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/web-focus/events/workshops/york-library-2013/Twitter: #??? Preparing For The Future: Helping Libraries Respond to Changing Technological, Economic and Political Change Brian Kelly UKOLN University of Bath Bath, UK UKOLN is supported by: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 licence (but note caveat) Email: b.kelly@ukoln.ac.uk Blog: http://ukwebfocus.wordpress.com/ Twitter: @briankelly Acceptable Use Policy Recording this talk, taking photos, discussing the content using Twitter, blogs, etc. is welcomed providing distractions to others is minimised.
  • A centre of expertise in digital information management www.ukoln.ac.uk About Me Brian Kelly: • UK Web Focus: national advisory post to UK HEIs • Long-standing Web evangelist (since 1993) • Based at UKOLN at the University of Bath • Prolific blogger (1,100+ posts since Nov 2006) • User of various devices to support professional (and social) activities • Prolific speaker (~400 talks from 1996-2012) • Author of peer-reviewed papers on various Web topics • About to start life as a free-lance consultant 3 Introduction
  • Abstract Abstract What technological (and social) developments might we expect to arrive which will affect the working environment of the academic library? We can expect … But there are dangers of making plans based on technological determinism. This workshop provides an opportunity for participants to make use of a methodology for identifying 'weak signals' of technological developments and an open sense-making process for discussing the implications of such developments. 4
  • In the Future Data will be Big 5
  • In the Future Content and services will be open 6
  • In the Future We will own our services and content 7
  • In the Future We will see a growth in use of online services 8
  • In the Future We will see the importance of librarians and information professionals acknowledged 9
  • In the Future We will see greater investment in libraries 10
  • In the Future We will travel to work by monorail 11
  • Monorails 12 What I expected in the future
  • In the Future We will use jetpacks at weekends 13
  • Has the Future Arrived? Hoverpacks do exist 14
  • Shush! 15 Librarians will appropriate technological developments to support their activities! Acknowledgements to Patrick Hochstenbach (@hochstenbach)
  • What Can We Conclude? Assumptions of: • Inevitability of technological developments • Economic growth (we can afford them) • Political and social environment (no legal or environmental barriers) There is a need to: • Be wary of predictions which:  Simply justify our organisation‟s current approaches (cf. music industry)  Reflect personal beliefs / discipline norms • Base predictions on evidence • Acknowledge that evidence may challenge organisational or personal beliefs / prejudices 16
  • The Context In the future mobiles will be smaller & faster; Data will be Big and content and services will be open. Lots of opportunities for librarians  17
  • Ideas initially described in paper presented at EMTACL (Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries) conference See bit.ly/emtacl12- kelly 18 Accompanying Paper
  • Time of Growth  1990s & early 2000s saw: • Increased funding across education sector • Significant developments in IT sector • Willingness by senior managers & funding bodies to invest in innovative IT developments (e.g. JISC development programmes) 19 “Great proposal – we’ll fund it” Image from Flickr. CC BT-NC-SA licence: http://www.flickr.com/photos/inlinguamanchester/5036313154/
  • Time of Growth is Over  Late 2000s and beyond: • Decreased funding across education & public sector • Acknowledgements that innovation can provide growth and cost savings • Significant developments continue in IT sector • Investment in innovative IT developments need to be based on evidence of benefits & likleyhood of success 20 Image from Flickr. CC BY-NC-ND licence: http://www.flickr.com/photos/drewleavy/339489258// “You want how much? And no evidence it will work! You’re crazy!”
  • Lessons From The Past Importance of open standards: • Open standards are essential for interoperability; preservation; … • Therefore use SMIL and SVG (open standards from W3C) and not Flash (proprietary) The need to be realistic • What happened to SMIL and SVG? • The marketplace didn‟t embrace the open standards • Adoption of open standards would have been costly • Flash is now being superceded by HTML5 • Flash‟s demise due to lack of support by Apple on mobile devices 21
  • Why Future-Watch? Sometimes: • Technologies may be slow-burners • May still be irrelevant to our businesses 22 Metro, 1 Nov 2012
  • Why Future-Watch? Need for future-watching to help identify tomorrow‟s key technologies: • Changes to existing business processes • Decisions on assigning resources to find out more (e.g. commissioning reports) • Investing in training & development in new areas • Exploring ways of deprecating existing services (cf WH Smith‟s decision to stop selling CD singles in 2004) • … 23
  • Group Exercise In about 5 groups: • Identify 4 technology / technology-related trends which you feel will have a significant impact on your work in 2-5 years time 24
  • Group Exercise In about 5 groups: • Identify 4 technology / technology-related trends which you feel will have a significant impact on your work in 2-5 years time • Share your 4 technologies with the other groups (only 4!) 25
  • Group Exercise In about 5 groups: • Identify 4 technology / technology-related trends which you feel will have a significant impact on your work in 2-5 years time • Share your 4 technologies with the other groups (only 4!) • Agreed on a vote on the other groups‟ list:  3 = Yes, this is important  2 = Could be important  1 = Doubtful; sceptical  0 = No way! (no half marks; no single transferable votes!) 26
  • Previous Examples From previous workshops the following technological / societal developments were used: • Mainstream areas • Niche areas 27 HTML5 EPUB “Openness”“BYOD”
  • JISC Observatory JISC Observatory: • JISC-funded initiative • Systematises processes for anticipating and responding to projected future trends & scenarios • Provided by JISC Innovation Support Centres at UKOLN and CETIS • See <http://blog.observatory.jisc.ac.uk/> 28 Note: • JISC Observatory work about to close due to cessation of JISC core funding for UKOLN & CETIS • Therefore need for institutional understanding of processes
  • JIS Observatory process JIS Observatory process 29
  • Scanning Activities • Blog posts: Posts published on JISC Observatory blog and on existing blogs. • Monitoring trends: Monitoring trends in order to:  Benchmark current usage patterns  Identify trends  Identify emerging patterns of usage 30 Google searches for “learning analytics” took off in 2010. Possible indicator of relevance across sector & need for further investigation.
  • Sense-making Need to: • Understand limitations of evidence-gathering techniques (including documenting „paradata‟ so survey findings are reproducible & can be critiqued) • Provide suggestions of implications of developments for the sector In addition need to encourage feedback on: • Evidence-gathering techniques • Interpretation of findings • Implications of developments In order to inform: • Further investigation • Policy-making, planning and funding31
  • Significant Trends: Mobile 32 We now know of the importance of Mobile Tecmark Digital Marketing Agency
  • Significant Trends: Mobile 33 We now know of the importance of Mobile Cisco
  • Significant Trends: Mobile 34 We now know of the importance of Mobile: but did we say the same when WAP came along? Opera
  • Significant Trends: Social Media There were “more than 150 million Tweets about the Olympics over the past 16 days”. [Twitter blog] 35
  • Significant Trends: Social Media Survey in Aug 2012 of institutional use of Facebook across the 24 Russell Group universities found >1M „Likes‟ followers 36
  • Behind The Data Trends in Fb „Likes‟ for Russell group Unis since Jan 2011 show steady increase 37 Jan 11 Sep 11 May 12 Jul 12 But note increase in Jul 2012 due to addition of 4 new universities! But might trends hide a more complex story: • Usage & growth dominated by one significant player. • More modest usage generally
  • Need for Paradata and Discussion Surveys carried out to monitor usage & trends for: • Institutional use of social media • Use of researcher profiling services (e.g. Google Scholar, Academia.edu, …) across institutions Observations (and feedback): • Differing results found if quotes used • Possible inclusion of wrong Unis (e.g. Newcastle University, Australia) • Personalised results depending on client environment 38 Need to provide paradata and encourage feedback on processes and intrepretation of findings
  • Lies, Damned Lies and Graphs “#Blekko traffic goes through the roof – for good reason. Try it out!” Based on blog post entitled “Blekko’s Traffic Is Up Almost 400 Percent; Here Are The CEO’s Five Reasons Why” (includes dissatisfaction with Goole) 39 Is Blekko’s Traffic Really Going Through The Roof? Will It Challenge Google?, UK Web Focus blog, 18 April 2012
  • Open Sense-making Importance of open approaches to interpretation of signals: • Evidence-gathering methodologies may have flaws • Incorrect or inappropriate implications may be made • This may lead to wrong decisions being made 40 Open sense-making approaches may be difficult – your marketing department may wish a consistent, positive message to be made.
  • Beware vested interests who may be threatened by implications of predictions Developments may • Be aligned with current plans • Challenge current plans 41
  • Group Exercise 2 Agree on a hot topic and describe how you would: • Gather evidence of its importance • Interpret the evidence • Address personal / departmental / institutional biases • Identify reasons to engage (e.g. actions needed now; actions needed in the future; risks if actions not taken; …) Examples: • What should we be doing with mobile? • Should we have a Library Facebook page? • Should we provide cover pages for printouts from the IR? 42
  • Informing Practice Cover pages in IRs may: • Corrupt embedded metadata • Degrade workflow practices if paper subsequently uploaded to another IR 43 Question: • “what’s so bad about a cover sheet from a user’s POV?” Survey across IR sector: • Branding is the main motivation for use of cover sheets • Mostly created manually • Can inhibit text-mining and Google SEO
  • Sense-Making: Use of Fb Session at IWMW 2013: • Librarian 1 (research-intensive Uni): Students keep telling us to “keep out of our social space” • Librarian 2 (teaching Uni): We set up a Library Facebook page. It works because “we need a presence where students hangout” 44 Personal perspectives. How do we: • Gather evidence which informs policies and practices? • Make the evidence-based decisions?
  • University of Bedford Library Facebook page 45 University of Bedford Library Facebook page
  • Across the Sector Look beyond the host institution, institutional and departmental culture and personal prejudices 46 Opportunities Risks
  • Opportunities and Risks Risks averse: • Public sector • Libraries Risks of being risk-averse • Missed opportunities • Criticisms from users • Advantages to competitors Need for a managed approach to: • Assessing risks • Risk mitigation • Acceptance of risks 47 Kelly, B. and Oppenheim, C., 2009. Empowering users and their institutions: A risks and opportunities framework for exploiting the potential of the social web.
  • “It‟s About Nodes and Connections” Cameron Neylon keynote at OR 2012: “Networks qualitatively change our capacity” • With only 20% of a community connected only limited interaction can take place • This increases drastically as numbers of connected nodes grows Examples: • Phone networks (no use with only 1 user!) • Tweeting at events • Galaxy Zoo Implications: • Importance of best practices for popular & well-used channels e.g. Twitter/Facebook and not Identi.ca/Diaspora 48 “Filters block. Filters cause friction” Need for client-side, not supply-side filters. Theory
  • 49 Open Data “Is London 2012 a haven for open data?” Conclusions: • “Not this time” • “But it is the first data Olympics” • “It's hard to see that by [Rio] 2016 this won't emerge as data we can all use”
  • Open Data “Manchester City to open the archive on player data and statistics” Example of: • Public interest in open data • Interest from commercial sector 50
  • 51 Use of Open Data in Libraries Trends in reusing Library usage data, e.g. JISC‟s Library Impact Data Project Average number of books borrowed and e-resource logins for ~33,000 students in final year of studies Image & data provided by Dave Pattern under a CC BY-NC-SA licence
  • 52 Early Signals? News stories (Aug 2012) about plans for privatisation at London Metropolitan University
  • Follow-up comment (20 Aug 2012): “VC should be applauded for the classic business move of getting the university to concentrate on its core activity” 53 Early Signals? Carl Lygo is chief executive of the 'for profit' BPP Professional Education group and principal of BPP University College
  • Recap Within your organisation / sector there is a need to have mechanisms for identifying technological developments which may have an impact on the business: • Observing trends and signals • Observing signals from diversity of sources • Interpreting the implications • Identifying changes which may be needed within the organisation • Inviting feedback and critiques of the evidence-gathering processes and the interpretations of the findings 54
  • Challenge For Librarians In time of uncertain futures: • Use evidence-based approaches to understanding the future • Understand the changing environment • Engage with opportunities in areas of growth and institutional importance • Be open and encourage discussion on analysis & interpretation of findings 55
  • Serenity prayer Serenity prayer: God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, Courage to change the things I can, And wisdom to know the difference. 56 Tim Berners-Lee didn‟t accept the evidence of the popularity of Gopher!
  • Beyond The Uncertainties What are the “only three certainties in life”? • Death • Taxes • The government is out to get you / other jokey remark 57 Benjamin Franklin once said “There are only two certainties in life - death and taxes”. What‟s the relevance to today‟s session? The three certainties: • Death • Taxes • At some point we will all leave our host institution
  • Information Literacy • Defined as “the ability to find, use, evaluate and communicate information” • Felt to be “an essential skill in this digital age and era of life-long learning” LILAC Conference home page 58
  • About This Section What happens when: • “The axeman cometh” and staff are made redundant or take early retirement? • Researcher follow a conventional route and leave when their funding finishes • They wish to continue to exploit their professional interests as:  A consultant  An itinerant researcher  At another institution  A means of developing their CV 59 Who has responsibility for ensuring staff & researchers are able to respond appropriately to such „life events‟?
  • Assumptions The University service environment may assume: • You can trust the institution • We will provide the appropriate IT infrastructure • We are here to help you But: • When you leave we don‟t care (unless you donate money!) • Our auditors tell us we must delete accounts when people leave • We run courses for new staff & students (our assets) but not when they are about to leave (our liabilities) 60
  • Policy at Bath University When staff leave 61 See http://www.bath.ac.uk/bucs/news/news_0013.html
  • Policy at Bath University Detailed policies 62 • Staff leave • Staff have a new job in the Uni • Staff are dismissed • Staff die University gives very brief details when:
  • Revisiting Information Literacy Information literacy is defined as • “the ability to find, use, evaluate and communicate information” And is regarded as • “an essential skill in this digital age and era of life-long learning” Therefore let‟s explore ways of: • Supporting staff who wish to continue use and communicate information after they leave the host institution • Ensure staff have the life-long skills to use, evaluate and communicate information beyond their host institution‟s IT environment 63
  • The Context Cessation of core funding for UKOLN, CETIS and OSS Watch. 64 UK Web Focus blog, 21 December 2012
  • The Context Cessation of core funding for UKOLN, CETIS and OSS Watch. 65 JISC OSS Watch blog, 15 February 2013 We are seeing staff at well- established JISC-funded organisations having to prepare for a “new future”
  • Personal Motivations My interests are to ensure that: • My professional „brand‟ persists when I leave my host institution • My research publications continue to be an asset after I leave my host institution • My authorship of papers is correctly attributed • I can continue to engage with my professional communities after I leave my host institution • I can continue to access and manage relevant services after I leave my host institution • I do not undermine relationships with my current host institution after I leave 66
  • The Institutional Repository Opus, the University of Bath institutional repository, provides a secure, reliable & maintained repository for my research papers, project reports, etc. 67
  • Persistency of Records Informal feedback: • "Records disappear when someone leaves because that's entirely appropriate." • "Staff leaving the university have a different relationship to the organisation. By rights we should shut off ALL accounts the day the relationship with the organisation ends." Institutional context: “this is obviously down to institutional management of people records” Where does your policy fit in the spectrum? • We‟re focussing on the REF and our CRIS (Current Research Information System) • We are loyal to former employees68
  • Manage Your Own Records Ensure that a record of your work (e.g. your publications) is available beyond the institution (e.g. on LinkedIn) 69
  • Manage Your Own Data Ensure that your (open access) publications are hosted in an environment you can maintain when you leave the institution. For example: • ResearchGate 70 Papers hosted initially in local open access repository
  • Manage Your Own Data 71 Ensure that your (open access) publications are hosted in an environment you can maintain when you leave the institution. For example: • ResearchGate • Academia.edu No permission to upload book chapter, so metadata-only records
  • My Own Thoughts, Ideas Ensure that if you have a blog it isn‟t trapped in the institution: • Create a blog in the Cloud initially • Migrate your blog 72
  • Use Cloud Sharing Services Have you got your drive Skydrive, Google Drive & Dropbox accounts? 73 Collaborative peer-reviewed papers since 2012 have been written using Skydrive: • File in once place (avoids multiple master copies problem). • Can be viewed (and updated) on mobile devices • Can use MS Word in the Cloud Display of W4A 2012 paper on iPod Touch
  • Manage Your Own Server The spectrum of ownership: • Your CV and list of publications • Your publications themselves • Your blog content • The server for your blog 74
  • Netskills Training 75 Netskills course
  • View of a retired academic “Last night, I wrote reference for an ex-colleague, and noticed that the form expected me to belong to an institution. I guess that identity formation is ongoing work. Am I retired just because I have a pension? Retired is a deadly label I think.” Recently retired academic from a northern university 76
  • Your Digital Identity What is your digital identity? What makes you you online? • Your ideas (e.g. express on your blog)? • Your email engagement? • Your community engagement? • Your community? • Your resources? • Your affiliation with your institution (e.g. (1) you are a „corporate‟ person; (2) “blue till I die”; …)? • Your work colleagues • …? 77
  • ORCID Take control of your research identity! ORCID: • Open Researcher and Contributor ID • Non-proprietary alphanumeric code to uniquely identify scientific / academic authors • Managed by ORCID Inc. an open & independent registry 78 My ORCID: 0000-0001-5875-8744
  • Email 79 How do I: • Manage Gb of email messages? • Migrate content to alternative location • Associate new location with email client? Over 17 years of email use have: • Large number of messages • Large number of contacts • Personal & professional uses Need to be able to: • Migrate content • Manage connections • Migrate list usage
  • Email As Authentication Tool 80 Change your email address to ensure you aren‟t locked out of Cloud services! Claim your papers in Google Scholar while your institutional email is valid – otherwise you might not be able to claim them!Without access to valid email address you won‟t be able to use & manage your content (info literacy!)
  • Links with the Institution 81 “You’ve rejected me / Our relationship was fated to finish. But I still care about you”
  • My „Link Love‟ 82 As described in OR 12 paper, links from popular blogs & social media sites can enhance Google ranking of repositories I wish to continue to provide benefits to host institution by: • Ensuring valuable content is not lost • Transfer digital assets where appropriate • Provide „link love‟ to institutional Web site
  • “After Bath” 83 Advice for graduates provided by Careers Service
  • Research Concordance Shouldn‟t life-long skills to manage digital content be address in Research Concordance?84
  • Conclusions To conclude: • Staff & researchers will spend only a part of their working lives within their current host institution • They should develop skills in being productive beyond the institutional environment • This can enhance the productivity of UK plc. • Opportunities for librarians to support such work • But do librarians see their role primarily to support use of institutional services? • Opportunity to address this as part of a Research Concordance suitable for changed economic environment? 85
  • Over To You What do you do to ensure: • That your staff & researchers have life-long IT skills? • Are comfortable with use of Cloud services and not just institutional tools? • Are able to exploit their ideas and resources in order to enhance productivity of UK plc? 86
  • The Data will be Big, but our users will continue to use Facebook and Twitter But research data will grow in importance as will use of mobiles. According to the evidence the future isn‟t quite what I expected. But it has helped to identify our business strategies. Conclusions (1) 87
  • The Data will be Big, but our users will continue to use Facebook and Twitter But research data will grow in importance as will use of mobiles. According to the evidence the future isn‟t quite what I expected. But it has helped to identify our business strategies. Conclusions (2) 88