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Why Impact, ROI and Marketing are No Longer Dirty Words
 

Why Impact, ROI and Marketing are No Longer Dirty Words

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Slides for a talk on "Why Impact, ROI and Marketing are No Longer Dirty Words" given by Amber Thomas, JISC on Monday 11 July 2011.

Slides for a talk on "Why Impact, ROI and Marketing are No Longer Dirty Words" given by Amber Thomas, JISC on Monday 11 July 2011.

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  • Amber Thomas Programme Manager at JISC I've worked mainly in repositories, teaching materials and IPR support. Currently responsible for Jorum and the technical and legal support for the OER Programme.   In the broader context, my colleagues are doing a lot of work particularly around REF, and digital content. This presentation is my attempt to pull together the threads across these areas, with an emphasis on social media where possible.   I'm on my own learning curve when it comes to these concepts,and I can't claim to represent all the areas here, but hopefully to signpost where the thinking is happening .
  • Impact, RoI and marketing are often treated as dirty words in the circles I move in. Even the title of this presentation has been met with raised eyebrows. So lets start here. metrics are about comparisons and benchmarking, but that there is nothing suitable to compare the particular activity to that which can be measured is not always what should be measured: counting access instead of use, for example if the biggest impacts are far downstream or far in the future, we risk missing them in the race to evidence immediate impacts caring about metrics mean only high levels of use will justify activity: metrics don’t respect the long tail, and academia is all about the long tail formalising social media institutionalises / depersonalises it and therefore misses the point whilst personally rewarding, social media might not actually be a very good use of our time, and increased scrutiny on social media might challenge our autonomy concepts around metrics and impact come from business: they fundamentally don’t belong in education
  • Social media is not an isolated activity, it is in a broader context. Within each of these levels there are issues about value and ownership.   The way communications departments, sometimes from a Press/PR perspective, think in terms of broadcast, and corporate message.   There are hotly debated issues around  whether universities even see themselves as part of a sector the role of higher education in employment the notion of student satisfaction the globalisation of higher education The value propositions of much of this are contested   Understanding the value of social media needs us to bear this in mind: our models of impact are built on shifting sands.  
  • exciting fast disruptive social
  • If we use the language of markets , things look fairly clear. there are suppliers promote products, clients buy them and are satisfied or not. But that's not often how we see ourselves. There's an alternative and more familiar narrative about universities as brokers and nurturers of knowledge , about global scholarship.
  • Because social media can be used in so many different ways, there is no one-size-fits all   There are new services emerging all the time to help us do this.
  • There are challenges here too, issues and risks that need to be managed. what are we measuring? also spread of effort between broadcasting and narrowcasting effort needed to listen and respond effort to manage multi-channel multi-platform staff skills and appetite managing expectations ofstakeholders amplified and dangerous: risk management So with that in mind, lets talk about some of those dirty words direct and indirect true of costs and benefits particular staff costs in change e.g shifting effort from centralised comms to more devolved group-level comms   now and later benefits to doing the activity benefits immediate upon completing the activity benefits delayed in time actual and potential e.g building a university's reputation is great, but how can you prove it has increased income? quant & qualitative not just numbers as you'll see, qual is important too, especially for listening   drivers & justifications not just about control but also about making the argument for change its rarely a simple equation which brings us on to ...
  • IS THE TIME THAT STAFF SPEND DOING THIS SOCIAL MEDIA STUFF WORTHWHILE? SUPPORTIVE: HOW DO I SUPPORT THEM IN DOING THIS? MAKE THE CASE IT’S WORTHWHILE UNSUPPORTIVE: HOW DO I AVOID THEM GETTING DISTRACTED FROM THEIR MAIN WORK BY THIS? MAKE THEM ACCOUNT FOR THEIR TIME
  • RE-READ THIS
  • Found out very useful things Who is using content where eg China Specific user feedback - eg Countdown 1,000 hits before a comment Very time consuming But valued
  • RE-READ THIS
  • Cameron Neylon (at a RC) et al Intention to develop better ways to measure research impact also see altmetrics headfirst into impact and metrics debate
  • OER space more resistance to measurement David Wiley's "OERs are like toothbrushes" post and debate But this report did listen to usage and found it useful
  • Not just about research or teaching and learning The role of universities in communities and the economy is also being explored, along with the impact models to measure them. Forthcoming paper from DMU explores how a social media city-based project has mapped its outcomes to the Research Impact model.
  • In my personal opinion, the ostrich approach is not an option
  • what might drive greater consistency in reporting on metrics and how might it be supported by better technology? develop business intelligence approaches improve activity data approaches improve visualisation and interpretation techniques skills skills skills - who can do this? getting, crunching, visualising, interpreting data don't forget the qualitative: feedback, stories and narratives matter too  Understand commercial social media impact models better:  How does the commercial world do this? what hit rate do they expect? is social media itself a loss leader but part of a bigger plan? Have an eye on the future does the growth in mobile and apps change any of this? how important is the need to know who someone is and track their use (through fb/twitter oath, for example, or encouraging sign-up to free web services) and how does that sit alongside “open”? include social media and activity data as part of research impact analytics and learning analytics Back to the market model and the knowledge model Perhaps: If we are to engage with the impact debate, perhaps our task is to use the language of the market model to defend the values of the knowledge model.

Why Impact, ROI and Marketing are No Longer Dirty Words Why Impact, ROI and Marketing are No Longer Dirty Words Presentation Transcript

  • Why Impact, ROI and Marketing  are no Longer Dirty Words Amber Thomas Programme Manager, JISC 11 th July 2011 UK Open University (c) HEFCE Amber Thomas, JISC all rights reserved except where otherwise stated Handle: XXX
  • Contents
    • Contents 
    • Understand our context
    • Explore key concepts
    • Role of metrics in decision-making
    • Signposting the impact discussion
    • The view ahead
        •  
  • Context Resistance to measurement
  • Context: social media in FE/HE   t
      • Social media as part of online services
      • Digital content as part of online services
      • Online services as part of marketing & communications
      • Online services as part of the FE/HE institution
      • The FE/HE institution as part of UK society
      • UK society as part of the world
    •  
  •   Context: Change :     Martin Bean, OU Speaking at JISC10
  • Context: Who is the social in our social media?
      • inside the institution:
        • academics: as researchers
        • academics: as teachers
        • services: libraries, IT, catering, accommodation, conferences
        • students
      • institutional management has different levels of control, each has different motivations
      • outside the institution:
        • potential learners and informal learners
        • the public/society
        • employers
  • Contents
    • Contents 
    • Understand our context
    • Explore key concepts
    • Role of metrics in decision-making
    • Signposting the impact discussion
    • The view ahead
        •  
  • Exploring ... social media as part of the web
    • A message and a medium
      • Social media as speaking (marketing)
      • Social media as listening (market intelligence)
      • Social media as exchange (learning, scholarship, CRM?) 
    • Reach is partal but growing
    • Social media is affecting SEO ratings
    • See Maximising Online Resource Effectiveness
    • Social media and impact
      • We can measure some aspects of social media activity with metrics
      • And we can use social media to collect evidence of the impact of other activities
      • but are we actually measuring impact?
  • Exploring ... social media activity
    • Push
      • blogging as digital scholarship
      • blogging as services update
      • universities on facebook
      • twitter as alerts
      • twitter as exchange
      • wikis as collaboration
      • student as media producer
      • practitioner peer to peer 
      • amplification of teaching
      • ampiification of events
      • broadcasting platforms such as youtube/itunesU
    •   Pull
      • monitoring techniques
      • dashboards
      • blogs trackbacks and pings
      • url shortener intelligence
      • google analytics
      • twitter analytics
  • Exploring ... social media management decisions costs benefits opportunities risks impacts
  • Contents
    • Contents 
    • Understand our context
    • Explore key concepts
    • Role of metrics in decision-making
    • Signposting the impact discussion
    • The view ahead
        •  
  • the role of metrics in making decisions simple? DECISIONS EVIDENCE METRICS DECISION-MAKER(s)
  • the role of metrics in making decisions not so simple DECISIONS EVIDENCE METRICS VALUES STRATEGIES IMPACT MODELS STAKEHOLDER VIEWS ETC ! DECISION-MAKER(s) RESOURCES
  • Contents
    • Contents 
    • Understand our context
    • Explore key concepts
    • Role of metrics in decision-making
    • Signposting the impact discussion
    • The view ahead
        •  
  • signposting the impact discussion in ... digital content .
  • signposting the impact discussion in ... digital content .
  •   signposting the impact discussion in ... research .
  •   signposting the impact discussion in ... research .
  • signposting the impact discussion in ... learning and teaching
  • signposting the impact discussion in ... learning and teaching
  •   signposting the impact discussion in ... learning and teaching .
  •   signposting the impact discussion in ... 3 rd Stream / “BCE” .
  • Contents
    • Contents 
    • Understand our context
    • Explore key concepts
    • Role of metrics in decision-making
    • Signposting the impact discussion
    • The view ahead
        •  
  • The view ahead options for reponding to the impact agenda
      • deny it's happening
      • leave the people in suits to work it out
      • pay lip service
      • produce numbers
      • produce stories
      • deepen our listening approaches
      • improve our metrics
      • broaden our impact model
      • extend our impact timeframe
  • The view ahead possible directions
  • Links and Picture Credits
      • LINKS
      • “ Education meets social networking” slide, Martin Bean, OU http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/events/2010/04/presentations/openingkeynote.pdf
      • Splashes and ripples http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/digitisation/Impact_Synthesis%20report_FINAL.pdf
      • Listening for impact http://projects.oucs.ox.ac.uk/lfi/reports/LfI_Final_Report-1.1.pdf
      • Decisions on assessing research impact http://www.hefce.ac.uk/research/ref/pubs/2011/01_11/
      • Beyond impact workshop report http://beyond-impact.org/?page_id=64
      • “ What do they want?” slide, Martin Bean, OU http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/events/2010/04/presentations/openingkeynote.pdf
      • Effective Practice in a digital age http://www.jisc.ac.uk/publications/programmerelated/2009/effectivepracticedigitalage.aspx
        • Building a learning community – Northumberland College
        • Engaging learners in critical reflection – University of Edinburgh
        • Preparing students for a digital world – University of Salford
      • Sharing is good http://www.scribd.com/doc/56711651/openSpace-Usage-Report-Dec-2010-Apr-2011
      • Amplified Leicester http://www.nesta.org.uk/publications/assets/features/amplified_leicester_impact_on_social_capital_and_cohesion and http://travelsinvirtuality.typepad.com/suethomas/2011/05/mukherjee.html
      • ADDITIONAL IMAGES sourced through http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/xpert/attribution  with embedded metadata
        • Prisoner http://www.flickr.com/photos/30030574@N03/5654023124/
        • “ no more disruptive innovation please” http://www.flickr.com/photos/45024520@N03/4250382201/
        • signpost http://www.flickr.com/photos/63390731@N08/5812795087/
  • Acknowledgements
    • Thanks to:
      • Paola Marchionni, Josh Brown, David Kernohan, Andy McGregor, Neil Jacobs, Rachel Bruce, Stuart Dempster (JISC)
      • Pete Dalton, Evidence Base, BCU
      • Peter Robinson, Oxford
      • Sue Thomas, DMU
      • Alex di Savoia, University College Falmouth
      • http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/xpert/attribution/ for Prisoner and Head-in-Sand images with embedded attribution 
    •  
    • Contact me at:
    • [email_address]
    • @ambrouk