Linking Feral Event Data: IWMW 2009 Case Study

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Pre-recorded Slidecast of a talk on "Linking Feral Event Data: IWMW 2009 Case Study" given at the DC09 conference in Seoul, South Korea on 14 October 2009. …

Pre-recorded Slidecast of a talk on "Linking Feral Event Data: IWMW 2009 Case Study" given at the DC09 conference in Seoul, South Korea on 14 October 2009.

See http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/web-focus/events/online/dc09/

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  • 1. Linking Feral Event Data: The IWMW 2009 Case Study A Slidecast for the “Linking Feral (Uncontrolled) Data” workshop at DC09 Brian Kelly UKOLN University of Bath Bath UK UKOLN is supported by: This work is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 licence (but note caveat) Resources bookmarked using ‘ dc-2009 ' tag http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/web-focus/events/online/dc09/ Email: [email_address] Twitter: http://twitter.com/briankelly/ Blog: http://ukwebfocus.wordpress.com/
  • 2. IWMW 2009
    • IWMW 2009:
      • UKOLN’s annual Institutional Web Management Workshop
      • Set up in 1997 & held annually since
      • Aimed at members of UK HE’s institutional Web Management community
      • For practitioners, not researchers
      • 200 participants (& ~60 watching video)
  • 3. An Amplified Event
    • Recent IWMW events have been ‘amplified’. Technologies :
      • Live video stream of plenary speaker
      • Event blog
      • Video interviews
      • Official live blogger
      • Extensive use of Twitter
    • Best Practices
      • AUP
      • Quiet zone (no photos, …)
      • Agreement from speakers
  • 4. The Live Blogging
    • Dedicated Twitter accounts:
      • iwmw : event administration (“anyone found a phone”)
      • iwmwlive : live blogging of plenary talks
    • Approaches:
      • Dedicated official blogger (posted at iwmwlive, summaries on blog & video interviews)
      • Tag for event, based on approaches used in previous years and for use in other services (e.g. Flickr): iwmw2009
  • 5. The Approaches (1)
    • Service integration:
      • Events tweets pulled into Coveritlive
      • (Potentially) allowed people without Twitter accounts to engage in discussions
      • Provided another integration environment e.g. < http://iwmw.ukoln.ac.uk/ iwmw2009/video/ >
      • Provides additional RSS feed
      • Avoids “Twitter rot”
  • 6. The Approaches (2)
    • Remote audience as first class participants:
      • Slides on Slideshare
      • Engagement over Twitter (“can’t hear”)
    Note accessibility benefits (remote audience as visually & audio-impaired)
  • 7. The Approaches (2)
    • Remote audience as first class participants:
      • Slides on Slideshare
      • Engagement over Twitter (“can’t hear”)
      • Questions posed on Twitter:
  • 8. The Approaches (3a)
    • Tagging:
      • #iwmw2009 and (optional) #P n for plenary talks
      • Unique (?) tags for 2 talks (#iwmwp4 and #iwmwp6)
    Use of Twitter at IWMW 2009 If you wish to refer to a specific plenary talk or workshop session, we have defined a hashtag for each of the plenary talks (#p1 to #p9) and workshop session (#a1 to #a9, #b1 to #b4 and #c1 to #c5).
  • 9. The Approaches (3b)
    • What have the audience taken from the plenary talks?
      • iwmwlive Twitter account asked standard question at end of plenary talks:
        • “ What is the main thing you will take away from Derek's talk? #iwmw2009 #p1 ”
      • What do I take from #iwmw2009 #p1? No one's got a clue so keep your fingers crossed!
      • Take-away: The Googleisation of the student mentality #p1 #iwmw2009
      • #iwmw2009 #p1 Most important thing taken away - reinforcing that modern comms are change and *not* dumbing down
      • #iwmw2009 #p1 I'll take away a brilliant metaphor for how we are reacting to the dark conditions rather than making sure we read the signs
      • #iwmw2009 #p1 Going to grapple with how to find our digital content & what to do with it.
      • What do I take from #iwmw2009 #p1? No one's got a clue so keep your fingers crossed!
      • #iwmw2009 #p1 &quot;Images are the new words&quot;
  • 10. The Approaches (4)
    • Engaging With Audience’s Thoughts
      • Live speaker interaction with ‘Twitter wall’ for #P4 on “What is the Web?” (& event summary: #P9)
      • #iwmwp4 tag used to avoid confusion with other sessions
    • James will respond to things that are raised on the #iwmwp4 tag. Reporting of his talk will continue on #iwmw2009 #p4 as with other talks
    • Social web is important because it is about connecting people, other people and content. Not the be all and end all but still key #iwmwp4
    • #iwmwp4 think Paul trying to say tht courses are products nd thy could (in a brave world) be rated by students (the descriptor would remain)
    • what is the web? - the web is what you access thru your web browser - but who cares and why does it help to ask the question? #iwmwp4
    • I think nomenclature is the least of our challenges. Should move on from discussing the labels, and get to the meat! #iwmwp4
    • do shoe makers ask &quot;what is a shoe?&quot; - #cobblers #iwmwp4
  • 11. Recording The Evidence (1)
    • Twapperkeeper :
      • Hashtag specified prior to event
      • Tool provides HTML and RSS views of tweets (1,657 items)
  • 12. Recording The Evidence (2)
    • WTHashtag :
      • Hashtag specified prior to event
      • Screenshot taken shortly after event
      • Blog post on statistics published shortly after event
      • Data no longer available
    1,530 tweets 170 contributors 218.6 tweets per day 42.5% come from “The Top 10″ 4.4% are retweets 20.0% are mentions 34.5% have multiple hashtags
  • 13. Recording The Evidence (3)
    • Backupmytweets :
      • Used for my Twitter accounts (iwmwlive & briankelly) rather than of hashtags
      • Tool provides HTML, JSON & RSS views of tweets (280 items)
      • Data migrated to managed area
  • 14. Recording The Evidence (4)
    • Twitterdoc :
      • PDF of up to 500 tweets for event
      • File copied to managed area
  • 15. Recording The Evidence (5)
    • The Archivist :
      • Desktop client used to search for #iwmw2009 hashtag shortly after event
      • Tool provides XML and CSV views of tweets (1,024 items)
      • Live data no longer available
  • 16.
    • Background :
      • Tweets for plenary talks (#iwmw2009 #P n ) copied to UKOLN Web site
      • Links for searches for 19 parallel sessions (#iwmw2009 and #a0-9, #b1-b9 or #c1-c5)
      • Data no longer available
      • “ current date limit on [Twitter] search index is &quot;around 1.5 weeks but is dynamic and subject to shrink… ” Techcrunch, 11 Aug 2009
    Providing Access to Evidence
  • 17. Reserving The Evidence
    • Data (and image) of (transient) Twitter records migrated to UKOLN Web site few days after event.
    • Blog posts provides summaries.
    http://iwmw.ukoln.ac.uk/iwmw2009/twitter/
  • 18. Why Are We Doing This?
    • Why do we wish to reuse the Twitter posts?
      • To allow speakers / facilitators to see comments after the session
      • To allow participants to reflect on discussions
      • Potentially to enhance accessibility of videos (use iwmwlive record as caption)
      • As a testbed for research (e.g. exploring how Twitter is used and how it develops)
      • To advise others who use Twitter in various ways (e.g. as a formal teaching aid)
  • 19. The Concerns
    • Don’t Do It! (keep Twitter as intended)
      • It’s over-complex
      • It’s killing the spontaneity of the back channel
      • I’ll be forced to self-censor
  • 20. The Concerns
    • Don’t Do It! (keep Twitter as intended)
      • It’s over-complex
      • It’s killing the spontaneity of the back channel
      • I’ll be forced to self-censor
    • Don’t Do It! (keep events as intended)
      • It’s noisy, distracting and rude
      • Speakers won’t be open and honest
      • It’s only for the geeky elite!
  • 21. The Concerns
    • Don’t Do It! (keep Twitter as intended)
      • It’s over-complex
      • It’s killing the spontaneity of the back channel
      • I’ll be forced to self-censor
    • Don’t Do It! (keep events as intended)
      • It’s noisy, distracting and rude
      • Speakers won’t be open and honest
      • It’s only for the geeky elite!
    • Do It (but don’t use Twitter)
      • Use an open source solution
      • Use a distributed solution
      • Use a richer solution (rooms, access management, …)
  • 22. Additional Complexities
    • Who owns the data?
      • Author of tweets according to Twitter T&Cs
    • The tweets have escaped! Tweets replicated in:
      • Misc. search engines;
      • Twitter harvesting tools e.g. The Archivist
      • Integration environments e.g. Coveritlive
      • Blogs; Web pages; etc.
      • Local file store
  • 23. Issues
    • Should we be harvesting feral event data?
    • Should we regard (public) tweets as fair game?
    • Is Twitter good enough?
    • How do we address the risks of:
      • Changes in T&C (and trust) for commercial services (e.g. Twitter; FriendFeed/Facebook, …)
      • Reliance on (unproven?) alternatives
      • Migrating a community to a new environment
      • Missing the ‘point’ of and differences between the tools (Twitter & FriendFeed are different – see Caemon Neylon’s post )
  • 24. Questions? Note that comments, questions, etc. on issues raised are invited on the UK Web Focus blog: <http://ukwebfocus.wordpress.com/>
  • 25. http://ukwebfocus.wordpress.com/