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Welcome to gdlts 2009
 

Welcome to gdlts 2009

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    Welcome to gdlts 2009 Welcome to gdlts 2009 Presentation Transcript

    • Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarRotary International D3400 Sabtu 12 Desember 2009Hotel Best Western PremierSolo, Indonesia
      Officiated & Supported by : DG Thomas Aquinas
      Convenor : DGE Al Purwa
      District Trainer 2009-2010 : PDG Guz Goh
    • Welcome to GDLTSSelamatDatangdi GDLTS
      Sabtu 12 Desember 2009
      Hotel Best Western Premier
      Solo, Indonesia
    • Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Introduction of GDLTS &briefing of training expectations.   By DGE Al Purwa& PDG Guz Goh
    • Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      GDLTS is a district trainers training for discussion leaders, facilitators and trainers. GDLTS gives Rotarians
      • The opportunity to share & learn
      • The opportunity to serve beyond club level
      • The opportunity to develop more future leaders for the district
    • Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      In GDLTS ,
      • We learn about our responsibilities & our role.
      • We learn the finer points of public speaking
      • We learn about techniques for leading discussion & facilitating
      • We learn about how to prepare for our training assignments
    • Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      What are our expectations of you?
      We expect you to take GDLTS as your 1st step as district trainer
      We expect you to continue to acquire knowledge & techniques on:
      • Training expertise
      • Rotary knowledge
      • Prepare content for PETS, DTTS, DISTAS & other trainings
      • Help in the planning for the preparation of PETS, DTTS, DISTAS
      & other trainings.
    • Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Besides supporting DGE & D3400 in preparing the new Rotary year and help provide training to 2010-2011 Club & District Officers, Discussion Leaders can help the district to:
      • provide information & training to clubs in your area.
      • help prepare every club to have a club trainer
      • prepare every club to have a club information officer
      So as to prepare future club leaders. Once clubs and club leaders are knowledgeable they are equipped and ready to provide better Rotary service to the communities they serve.
    • Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Welcome Address 
      & Roll Call
      by DG Thomas Aquinas
    • Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      What makes a good Discussion Leader?   by PDG Guz Goh & PDG KeliekSoegiarto
    • Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Responsibilities of Discussion Leaders
      • Support DGE & D3400 in preparing the new Rotary year
      • Helping to develop and prepare better club & district leadership
      • Provide club & district officers with well prepared training
      • Provide club & district officers with effective learning experience
      • Be a reliable & updated resource person to club & district officers
    • Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Role of Discussion Leaders, Facilitators & Trainers
      • Prepare to be Group Discussion Leaders, Facilitators & Trainers
      • Acquire, learn & update Rotary knowledge & training contents
      • Improve public speaking, discussion leader & facilitator skills
      • Help provide training to 2010-2011club & district officers
      • Help conduct training meetings that support effective Rotary clubs
    • Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Training Objectives
      Understand the components that makes a good and effective public speaker/discussion leader/facilitator/trainer.
      Identify how to prepare yourself to be one.
      Implement what you have learnt and use it to practice and eventually perform.
    • Public Speaking
      knowledge & skills enhancement program
      13
      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Public speaking is a form of human communication that employs a particular type of dialogue.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
      14
      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Public Speaking
      the audience: the listeners who come to a speaking situation with their frame of reference.
      the occasion: the time and place;
      exigency: the demands, expectations or burden placed upon the speaker inherent in the situation.
      constraints: the limitations on what and how a speaker may say in responding to a rhetorical situation.
      the speaker: the speaker's actions shape the situation, influence how the audience will respond to the message, and to the speaker as well.
      The Rhetorical Situation
      Audience
      Speaker
      Message
      Exigency
      Constraints
      Occasion
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
      15
      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Audience
      Not all audiences are the same.
      Carefully assess the nature of the audience at hand
      Determine best ways to address the audience
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
      16
      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Audience
      In thinking about the audience who will be listening to
      your speech / presentation, consider the following
      audience demographics:
      • age
      • sex
      • family affiliation
      • sexual orientation
      • cultural diversity
      • racial background
      • economic and social standing
      • political identification
      • religious or philosophical
      orientation
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
      17
      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Audience
      Depending on who makes up your audience, you will select and shape your topic.
      To be responsive to the unique audience take into account how your audience is predisposed on an emotional and psychological level to respond to you or your topic
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
      18
      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Audience
      Consider the attitudes, beliefsandvalues of the frame of reference of the audience:
      • An attitude is the predisposition to respond favorably or unfavorably toward a topic.
      • A belief is a position or standard that audience members hold as valid or truthful.
      • Avalueis a deeply seated attitude commonly rooted in core beliefs, usually about the intrinsic worth of something.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
      19
      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Public Speaking
      the audience: the listeners who come to a speaking situation with their frame of reference.
      the occasion: the time and place;
      exigency: the demands, expectations or burden placed upon the speaker inherent in the situation.
      constraints: the limitations on what and how a speaker may say in responding to a rhetorical situation.
      the speaker: the speaker's actions shape the situation, influence how the audience will respond to the message, and to the speaker as well.
      The Rhetorical Situation
      Audience
      Speaker
      Message
      Exigency
      Constraints
      Occasion
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
      20
      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Occasion
      The occasion encompasses the time, place, medium and purpose for a speech.
      Timing of speech / presentation, consider events leading up to a rhetorical situation:
      long-term historical forces.
      simple set of recent events that set the context for a speech.
      Your analysis of the occasion goes hand in hand with the assessment of the audience.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
      21
      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Occasion
      Aristotle three types of speaking situations, each
      with its characteristic audience and type of occasion:
      Deliberative
      Forensic
      Epideictic
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
      22
      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Occasion
      Deliberative (political) oratory was concerned with problem solving in a legislative arena. The burden of the speaker was to advise fellow decision-makers on how to decide on the best course of action.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Occasion
      Forensic speaking occurred in a court of law before an audience that would render a verdict. The forensic speaker is expected to develop the facts of a case.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
      24
      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Occasion
      Epideictic (ceremonial) oratory was used for special occasions when a speaker spoke on questions of value.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
      25
      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Public Speaking
      the audience: the listeners who come to a speaking situation with their frame of reference.
      the occasion: the time and place;
      exigency: the demands, expectations or burden placed upon the speaker inherent in the situation.
      constraints: the limitations on what and how a speaker may say in responding to a rhetorical situation.
      the speaker: the speaker's actions shape the situation, influence how the audience will respond to the message, and to the speaker as well.
      The Rhetorical Situation
      Audience
      Speaker
      Message
      Exigency
      Constraints
      Occasion
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
      26
      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Exigency
      The exigency of a rhetorical situation is a
      demand, burden or expectation inherent in
      the situation.
      Sometimes the demand is stipulated by the
      nature of the type of speaking situation.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Exigency
      Example:
      The U. S. President presents "state of the union“
      address. He is expected to discuss the current
      political affairs, focusing on the most pertinent
      domestic and international concerns confronting
      Congress and the American people.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Exigency
      Persuasive speech.
      Expectation of such type of message is
      that you will talk about a meaningful social
      issue and provide convincing reasons and
      evidence to support your position.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Public Speaking
      the audience: the listeners who come to a speaking situation with their frame of reference.
      the occasion: the time and place;
      exigency: the demands, expectations or burden placed upon the speaker inherent in the situation.
      constraints: the limitations on what and how a speaker may say in responding to a rhetorical situation.
      the speaker: the speaker's actions shape the situation, influence how the audience will respond to the message, and to the speaker as well.
      The Rhetorical Situation
      Audience
      Speaker
      Message
      Exigency
      Constraints
      Occasion
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Constraints
      The constraints of a rhetorical situation are the
      limitations placed upon a speaker.
      Are there topics on a given occasion and for a
      particular audience that would be inappropriate?
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Constraints
      Does the speaker need to conform to rules of
      etiquette inherent in a situation?
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Constraints
      Audience pre-dispositions can place limits on the
      speaker.
      You may be constrained in your choice of content
      by considering ways the audience members'
      attitudes, beliefs and values predispose them to
      oppose your position.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Constraints
      The medium of communication may also impose limits.
      For instance, a speaker on the radio lacks a visual
      contact with the audience
      Or a speech on television is tailored to meet the time
      constraints of that medium.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
      34
      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Public Speaking
      the audience: the listeners who come to a speaking situation with their frame of reference.
      the occasion: the time and place;
      exigency: the demands, expectations or burden placed upon the speaker inherent in the situation.
      constraints: the limitations on what and how a speaker may say in responding to a rhetorical situation.
      the speaker: the speaker's actions shape the situation, influence how the audience will respond to the message, and to the speaker as well.
      The Rhetorical Situation
      Audience
      Speaker
      Message
      Exigency
      Constraints
      Occasion
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
      35
      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Speaker
      The speaker's actions influence the situation.
      How a speaker develops the message
      will influence how the audience
      responds to the situation.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Speaker
      The speaker may explicitly define the
      occasion at hand, providing an
      interpretation of how the
      rhetorical situation developed.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
      37
      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Speaker
      The types of rhetorical strategies
      - the kinds of evidence and persuasive appeals,
      - the methods of organization, use of language and
      - delivery will influence how the audience responds
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Speaker
      An effective speaker need to develop credibility;
      the higher the credibility, the more influence will
      the speaker have on shaping the situation.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Public Speaking
      the audience: the listeners who come to a speaking situation with their frame of reference.
      the occasion: the time and place;
      exigency: the demands, expectations or burden placed upon the speaker inherent in the situation.
      constraints: the limitations on what and how a speaker may say in responding to a rhetorical situation.
      the speaker: the speaker's actions shape the situation, influence how the audience will respond to the message, and to the speaker as well.
      The Rhetorical Situation
      Audience
      Speaker
      Message
      Exigency
      Constraints
      Occasion
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
      40
      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Public Speaking
      Public speaking, facilitating
      is a serious matter and needs
      to be approached as such.
      If you fail to prepare, then
      you are prepared to fail.
      The Rhetorical Situation
      Audience
      Speaker
      Message
      Exigency
      Constraints
      Occasion
    • Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Coffee Break
      Coffee Break
      Coffee Break
    • Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Do’s & Don’ts of a Discussion Leader?   by PDG Guz Goh
    • Successful Public Speaking
      knowledge & skills enhancement program
      43
      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Feeling some nervousness before giving a speech is natural and healthy.
      It shows you care about doing well. But, too much nervousness can be detrimental.
      Here's how you can control your nervousness and make effective, memorable presentations:
    • Tips For Successful Public Speaking
      knowledge & skills enhancement program
      44
      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Know the room.
      Be familiar with the place in which you will speak.
      Arrive early, walk around the speaking area and practice using the microphone and any visual aids.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Tips For Successful Public Speaking
      Know the audience.
      Greet some of the audience as they arrive.
      It's easier to speak to a group of friends than to a group of strangers.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Tips For Successful Public Speaking
      Know your material.
      If you're not familiar with your material or are uncomfortable with it, your nervousness will increase.
      Practice your speech and revise
      it if necessary.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Tips For Successful Public Speaking
      Relax.
      Ease tension by doing exercises.
      Visualize yourself giving your speech.
      Imagine yourself speaking, your voice loud, clear, and assured.
      When you visualize yourself as successful, you will be successful.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Tips For Successful Public Speaking
      Don't apologize. If you mention your nervousness or apologize for any problems you think you have with your speech, you may be calling the audience's attention to something they hadn't noticed.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Tips For Successful Public Speaking
      Concentrate on the message -- not the medium. Focus your attention away from your own anxieties, and outwardly toward your message and your audience. Your nervousness will dissipate.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Tips For Successful Public Speaking
      Turn nervousness into positive energy. Harness your nervous energy and transform it into vitality & enthusiasm.
      Gain experience. Experience builds confidence, which is the key to effective speaking.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Tips For Successful Public Speaking
      Use eye contact with each member of the audience in turn.
      Remember that some people get nervous in audiences too.
      Put them at their ease.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Tips For Successful Public Speaking
      Use visual aids where useful. Flip charts, overhead projectors and video can make the presentation more memorable.
      Keep visuals simple. If you don’t have the use of visuals remember that ‘words paint pictures in the mind'.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      More Tips…
      Consider giving handouts to your audience members.
      It might be a memory prompt for them when recalling your speech.
      *However, too much written material may put them off and you don’t want everyone reading during your presentation, so choose carefully when you give them out.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      More Tips…
      Remember that the audience has a responsibility too!
      Don’t think How can I survive this?, think… How can I do this brilliantly?
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      More Tips…
      Remember that, as with all things, you need to plan. Rather than “I hope I don’t panic”, work out how you would like things to be.
      Vary your voice tonality and speed during your presentation. Convey energy when you need to, and slow down to ‘draw them in close' when it’s appropriate.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Summary
      It is possible for public speaking to be fun and hugely satisfying. Once you’ve enjoyed a presentation, or even part of it, your self confidence will get a huge boost and you'll be off and running!
      The key is practice, practice, practice and practice.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Public Speaking Problems
    • Common public speaking problems:
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      ‘Drying up' or not being able to speak (Stage fright).
      Forgetting what you are talking about, your mind going blank.
      Having someone in the audience who knows more than you do.
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Common public speaking problems:
      People noticing that you are nervous.
      Inability to control your “Er”, “Um”, “OK” etc. & consistently repeating them and irritating your audience to death
      Inability to control the proper tone of your voice and pace of your speech.
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Common public speaking problems:
      The impossible to answer ‘question from Hell'
      The fear that your presentation is so awful and embarrassing that your social / career relationships are forever ruined.
      The audience talking over you or walking out
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Common public speaking problems:
      Firstly, let’s accept that we need fear.
      Our ancestors relied on fear to survive bigger, stronger and faster predators.
    • How much anxiety is good for public speaking?
      knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      When presenting we need a little anxiety as this will improve recall, raise energy levels and make for a more focused, dynamic speech.
      An overly laid-back speaker can easily bore!
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      How much anxiety is good for public speaking?
      We don’t want too much anxiety and we don’t want too much relaxation.
      Just enough tension to give us energy, and enough calmness for clear thinking and recall.
      We need the right balance.
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Public Speaking
      the audience: the listeners who come to a speaking situation with their frame of reference.
      the occasion: the time and place;
      exigency: the demands, expectations or burden placed upon the speaker inherent in the situation.
      constraints: the limitations on what and how a speaker may say in responding to a rhetorical situation.
      the speaker: the speaker's actions shape the situation, influence how the audience will respond to the message, and to the speaker as well.
      The Rhetorical Situation
      Audience
      Speaker
      Message
      Exigency
      Constraints
      Occasion
    • Avoiding Major Public Speaking Mistakes
      knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
    • knowledge & skills enhancement program
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Avoiding Major Public Speaking Mistakes
      ‘Mind reading from facial expressions'
      Being too sensitive to the way the audience looked.
      Trying to read audience moods.
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Avoiding Major Public Speaking Mistakes
      ‘Mind reading from facial expressions'
      Were they frowning?
      Did they have blank expressions?
      Did this mean they were hostile?
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Avoiding Major Public Speaking Mistakes
      Never guess what the audience is thinking.
      If you suspect someone is not enjoying it, approach them and give them a chance to say so.
      It’s consider that that’s the audience responsibility.
    • Dealing with a Difficult Audience
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Remember, your job is
      merely to present ideas and information in a compelling way, not to get into arguments with one audience member at the expense of the others.
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Dealing with a Difficult Audience
      Admit you don’t know something and promise to find out for them.
      Tell them that you would like to come back to that point.
      Ask them to come and see you afterwards for further discussion as you have limited time and much material to cover.
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Dealing with a Difficult Audience
      Stick to the main points of your speech.
      You don’t have to answer questions immediately or on the questioner’s terms. If people wish to side-line they can do it afterwards or during a break.
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Dealing with a Difficult Audience
      Remember:
      It’s not just about you justifying yourself to the audience. They carry half the responsibility in the situation.
      They are required to be polite, to listen to and absorb what you are saying, to ask relevant questions and to know when to keep quiet.
      Your responsibility extends only so far.
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Public Speaking Preparation
    • Public Speaking Preparation
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      It’s All in the Preparation
      To feel confident you need to be really familiar with your material. Hesitancy and constant note-reading do not a good speech make!
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Public Speaking Preparation
      Become familiar with the ‘signposts' of your speech and fully acquaint yourself with your content so that you can trust yourself to remember.
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Public Speaking Preparation
      Many good presenters I know use *mind-mapping to prepare and memorize speech notes. It’s quick and really aids memory and recall when you’re ‘up there doing it.
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Public Speaking Preparation
      Rehearse out loud until you feel 'conversationally comfortable' about your material
      It’s a very comfortable feeling when you know you can trust your unconscious mind to deliver.
      (This doesn’t mean you can’t have your notes handy just in case!)
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Public Speaking Preparation
      Using Humor (oh, in the US, be sure and use humor ;-)The use of humor in presentations can help fix an idea in peoples' minds as well as illuminating unexpected perspectives.
      But it has to be done in an (apparently) spontaneous way
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Public Speaking Preparation
      If people remain silent in response to one of my little gems (very rare of course ;-) I may comment on the silence itself, which often gets a chuckle.
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Public Speaking Preparation
      Don’t appear terrified when making a joke
      the audience may not respond as they would.
      Your words say “I am being creative and funny" but your voice tone, body posture and other unconscious signals say “I am terrified!" and people rely much more on these unconscious elements of your communication.
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Public Speaking Preparation
      Overall, I think humor is worth the risk because it makes a presentation more interesting and it’s a wonderful feeling when you make an audience roar with laughter!
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      The final lap, reality check!
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Keys to good public speaking appearance:
      Your appearance
      Your voice and how you speak
      Your interaction with the audience
      Your speech contents
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Public Speaking
      the audience: the listeners who come to a speaking situation with their frame of reference.
      the occasion: the time and place;
      exigency: the demands, expectations or burden placed upon the speaker inherent in the situation.
      constraints: the limitations on what and how a speaker may say in responding to a rhetorical situation.
      the speaker: the speaker's actions shape the situation, influence how the audience will respond to the message, and to the speaker as well.
      The Rhetorical Situation
      Audience
      Speaker
      Message
      Exigency
      Constraints
      Occasion
    • Your Appearance
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      It is not just about dressing
      appropriately, it has to do
      with your stage presence,
      what your body language
      conveys and how do you
      choreograph movements
      of your body parts in relation
      to your interaction with the
      audience that will make or
      break a successful appearance.
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Your Appearance
      With a big audience, audiovisual aids can help enhance your
      image on stage, but an effective speaker must exude stage
      presence to deliver a command performance.
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Your Appearance
      With a smaller audience your stage
      presence is vital to the success of
      winning the attention of the audience
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Your Appearance
      It's essential to communicate confidence when
      speaking in public or meeting a new client.
      When you speak, you represent a brand.
      The brand of you. How you talk, walk,
      and look reflect upon that brand.
      What does your body language say
      about you?
      Does it say you're trustworthy, confident,
      and competent, or just the opposite?
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      Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Your Appearance
      The Stance
      Former Secretary of State Colin Powell stands
      (or sits) tall -- steadfast and assured. No slumping
      or slouching for this soldier. A slouching body
      posture is a sure way giveaway to a lack of
      enthusiasm, confidence, and leadership ability.
      What to do: Keep your weight balanced on
      both feet, stand tall, eyes ahead. When sitting,
      avoid slumping into the fold of your chair or
      leaning back. Watch as people respond to you
      differently.
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      Your Appearance
      The Eyes
      Eye contact associates with trustworthiness, sincerity,
      and confidence, all the traits we look for in leaders.
      Make everyone feel as though you're having a
      one-on-one conversation with them. Draw them in with
      your eyes. You're talking to them, not at them.
      What to do: Maintain eye contact 70% to 80% of the time.
      Make everyone feel included and important. Look at the person you're
      speaking to you. If you're addressing a small or large group, break the
      room into three parts. Focus on one individual, make a point, shift your
      gaze to another part of the room, make a point, and do the same for the
      rest of the room.
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      Your Appearance
      The Arms
      Former Hewlett-Packard CEO CarlyFiorina is a very polished speaker. It's almost impossible to find a photograph of her with a closed posture. This means there's nothing in between her and her listeners. Example: standing behind a podium is closed -- it adds a block between you and the listener. Crossing your arms is closed as well.
      What to do: Simply avoid putting anything in between you and the listener.
      Keep your hands and arms unfolded, don't hold a binder, try to avoid
      standing behind a podium when possible.
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      Your Appearance
      The Hands
      Former President Bill Clinton hand gestures punctuate virtually every point, as does British Prime Minister Tony Blair and even Singapore’s Mentor Minister Lee Kuan Yew. Complex hand gestures means using both hands in various positions during a talk or presentation. Complex gestures reflect complex thought, and give us confidence in the listener.
      What to do: Use your hands! Don't try to mimic other people's gestures because you will look contrived. However, feel free to use your hands in a way that feels natural.
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      Your Appearance
      The Air of Confidence
      California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger
      has an air of confidence. Regardless of the
      events around him, he conveys a look of
      being in control. You won't see him wringing
      his hands, shuffling back and forth, jiggling coins
      in his pocket, or rubbing his hands repeatedly
      through his hair. He comes across as someone
      who won't cower, waffle, or retreat.
      What to do: Get rid of distracting body movements - tapping your toes,
      fidgeting with your fingers, pens, or coins… all signs of nervousness. Look
      and sound more engaged, channel energy to face, voice, and hand gestures.
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      Your Appearance
      Look Better Than Everyone Else
      Great leaders dress a little more nicely
      than the rest of the world. Ronald Reagan
      was said to always stand out as the best-
      dressed person in the room.
      In photographs, meetings, and public
      appearances, Reagan consistently looked
      sharp, smart and immaculately groomed.
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      Your Appearance
      Steer Clear of Distractions
      Flashy or too-big jewelries detract from
      the speaker. Accessories are just that…
      they accessorize, or complement, the
      rest of your wardrobe.
      Make sure your belts, rings, watches,
      earrings and necklaces are elegant,
      simple, and suitable for your outfit.
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      Your Appearance
      Be Culture-Appropriate
      Apple's Steve Jobs breaks many of life's rules,
      but he follows the most important one:
      Dress appropriately for the event or the culture.
      Apple has a rebellious, different, edgy culture,
      making his wardrobe of a black turtleneck,
      jeans, and sneakers entirely appropriate.
      A banker who shows up for a client meeting
      dressed like Jobs would lose credibility.
      Dress well -- and within expectations.
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      Your Appearance
      Always Be Ready For Your Best Shot
      Now that you look the part of a leader,
      make sure all your photographs reflect it.
      Your photo is often the first impression
      people have of you.
      Find a good portraitist and a get a
      professional, classy photograph of yourself.
    • Your Voice
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      One of the qualities that all great speakers have is the ability to
      electrify their listeners simply
      by the way they use their voices.
      They have an engaging vocal quality,
      a quality that you can master for your own professional business communications.
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      Your Voice
      Diction: The meaning of diction is enunciation, the art of speaking with clarity, or in such a way that each word is clearly heard.
      This is concerned with pronunciation and tone, rather than the choice of words or style.
      Verbal Enunciation is the act of speaking. Good enunciation is the act of speaking clearly and concisely.
      The opposite of good enunciation is mumbling, slurring or bad enunciation
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      Your Voice
      Phonetics: is the study of the sounds of human speech. It is concerned with the actual properties of speech sounds, and their production, audition and perception. The way a voice sounds (tones) and the way words are pronounced.
      The combination of diction and phonetics will give you that
      broadcast quality voice presence that most trained Stage, TV
      and Radio presenters, announcers and voice-overs possess.
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      Your Voice
      First Key:Vary Your Tone. Dynamic speakers vary the pitch and tone of their words. Dull speakers are monotone, reciting all words in the very same tone of voice.
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      Your Voice
      Second Key: Punch Key Words. Dynamic speakers punch the important words in every sentence to add emphasis.
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      Your Voice
      Third Key:Raise and Lower Your Volume. Dynamic speakers raise and lower the volume of voice during a talk, something John F. Kennedy did in his speech.
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      Your Voice
      Fourth key: Pause for Impact.
      Dynamic speakers know that nothing is as dramatic as a
      well-placed pause.
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      Your Voice
      Fifth Key: Vary Your Speed.
      Finally, dynamic speakers speed up
      and slow down, often in the same sentence or paragraph.
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      Your Voice
      Remember, the way you use your voice and an engaging vocal quality will help deliver a great presentation.
      Keeping your audience engaged
      does take a compelling message but it also requires a Dynamic Delivery
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      Let’s Review
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      Keys to good public speaking appearance:
      Your appearance
      Your voice and how you speak
      Your interaction with the audience
    • Interact with the audience
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      Stop Reading from notes
      Great communicators do not read from
      scripts, notes, or PowerPoint slides.
      It breaks down the rapport between
      listener and audience.
      Do this instead:Review your material to the point where you have completely absorbed the material, you can deliver it without notes.
      Business Week recently profiled Apple CEO Steve Jobs, whose magnificent presentations are the result of hours of grueling practice.
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      Interact with the audience
      Don’t Avoid eye contact
      Great communicators understand that
      eye contact is critical to building trust,
      credibility, and rapport.
      Far too many business professionals
      have a habit of looking at everything else
      but the audience.Do this instead:Maintain eye contact with your listeners at least 90% of the time.
      It's appropriate to glance at your notes or slides periodically for a few seconds. You are speaking for the benefit of your listeners.
      Speak to them, not the slides.
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      Interact with the audience
      Don’t Dress Down
      Great communicators look the part.
      Dressing well to deliver a speech or
      presentation emphasizes to your
      audience that you respect them and
      value their presence.
      Dressing well and appropriately takes
      a fair bit of research and preparation.
      Your audience appreciate this.
      Do this instead:Get help and advise from reliable sources whose recommendations you trust. Always dress appropriately for the culture, a little better than everyone else.
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      Interact with the audience
      Don’t Fidget, jiggle, and sway
      Great communicators eliminate small,
      annoying gestures or mannerisms.
      These habits inspire no confidence
      in the speaker.Do this instead:The solution is simple. Don't fidget, jiggle or sway!
      Videotape your presentations or rehearsals from time to time
      to catch your flaws.
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      Interact with the audience
      Never Fail to rehearse
      Great communicators always rehearse important presentations. Most bad presentations are the result of failing to practice talking out loud.Do this instead:Take a cue from Cisco CEO John Chambers.
      He spends hours rehearsing every component of his presentations, from the material to the flow of slides to when and where he's going to walk among the audience. It's preparation to the extreme, but it works.
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      Interact with the audience
      Stop Standing at attention
      Great communicators are not stiff. Standing at attention like a soldier waiting for orders might work for the army, but it makes presentations tedious.Do this instead:Move, walk, use hand gestures. Great speakers are animated in voice and body.
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      Interact with the audience
      Don’t Recite bullet points
      Great communicators assume the
      audience can read. Many speakers read the bullet points on their slides word for word. Slides (or any visual) act as a complement to the speaker, not the other way around.
      Do this instead:Do not recite the slide word for word.
      Include a story, anecdote, example to add color to the content.
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      Interact with the audience
      Don’t Speak for too long
      Great communicators know that leadership
      requires the ability to articulate a message
      that's passionate, clear, and concise.
      Studies proves that listeners lose their attention after approximately 18 minutes. Keep your speech or presentation short, punchy for impact.Do this instead:Edit everything you say. Do you spend five minutes saying something that you could otherwise say in 30 seconds? What can you cut out?
      Be thorough, yet concise in all manners of communication.Make sure you stop speaking before the audience stop listening!
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      Interact with the audience
      Don’t Fail to excite
      Great communicators grab their listeners' attention right out of the gate. Audiences remember the first thing you say and the last. But don't worry… if you're struggling to come up with an opening, here’s a solution.
      Do this instead:Tell your listeners why they should be excited about your content. Give your audience a reason to care.
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      Interact with the audience
      Don’t End on a dull note
      Great communicators end their presentations on an inspiring note. Most listeners walk away from a presentation remembering what was said at the end.Do this instead:Go ahead and summarize what you just said
      in the presentation, but leave your audience with one key thought… something they didn't know that makes their jaws drop in collective awe.
    • Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Breakout Sessions
      Preparation for Role play
         - Group A with PDG Keliek & DGN Ridlo
         - Group B with PDG Miko & DGE Al
         - Group C with PDG Soerjo & PP Ronny Mustamu
      - Group D with PDG Guz
    • Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Role Play
    • Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Plan and Briefing for GDLs for PETS, DTTS & DISTAS
      President Elect Training Seminar (PETS)    -     06 Feb 2010 in Jakarta District Team Training Seminar (DTTS)      -     06 Feb 2010 in Jakarta
       
      President Elect Training Seminar (PETS)    -     13 Feb 2010 in Surabaya
      District Team Training Seminar (DTTS)      -     13 Feb 2010 in Surabaya
       
      District Assembly (DISTAS)                     -     13 May 2010 in Surabaya
       
    • Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Plan and Briefing for Other District Trainings
      District Membership Seminar        -    13 November 2010 in Yogyakarta
      District Rotary Foundation Seminar    -    14 November 2010 in Yogyakarta
       
      Now that you have been trained as a Discussion Leader, we hope that you can also conduct trainings
      for Rotarians and Clubs in your area.
       
    • Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSabtu 12 December 2009
      Closing Remarks by DGE Al Purwa      
    • Group Discussion Leader Training SeminarSaturday, 12 December 2009
      Thank you!
      The Future of Rotary D3400
      is now in Your Hands!