Wai Yee Mah - Myths vs facts - Clearing up the confusion about canned foods
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Wai Yee Mah - Myths vs facts - Clearing up the confusion about canned foods Wai Yee Mah - Myths vs facts - Clearing up the confusion about canned foods Presentation Transcript

  • MYTHS VS. FACTS – CLEARING UP THE CONFUSION ABOUT CANNED FOODS Presented by: MAH Wai Yee, Head Dietitian MyKenzen Nutrition Services
  • History of canned food • 18th century : “An army marches on its stomach” – Napoleon • Nicolas Appert : “ The Father of Canning” • 19 – 20th century : canned food used mainly by military • 20th century : commercialisation of canning
  • History of canned foods • 18th century : “An army marches on its stomach” – Napoleon • Nicolas Appert : “ The Father of Canning” • 19 – 20th century : canned food used mainly by military • 20th century : commercialisation of canning
  • Canning • Method of preserving food • Destroy microorganisms by heat – “Commercially sterile” • Vacuum sealed - sealing out air
  • MYTH # 1 Canned food need preservatives to achieve long shelf -life
  • Canning = Cooking • Canned/cooked food: • Can fruits and vegetables • Fish (can tuna, sardines, mackerel or salmon) • Can beans • Long shelf life (Average 2 – 3 years)
  • The Stages of Canning Pre - preparation Filling Pre- processing Filling of medium Seaming Washing Retorting Cooling Drying Labelling/ cartoning
  • Pre - preparation Canning Fish •Air/water Thawing •Cutting Fish (Sardines, Mackerel) are cut into sections with head and tail removed.
  • Pre - preparation Canning Beans •Soaking of beans
  • Cleaning of raw materials All foods to be canned must be cleaned thoroughly to remove contaminants and inedible matter. E.g. gutting, destoning Pre-preparation Gutting of fish Destoning of beans
  • Blanching Products which contain fruits and vegetables need these ingredients blanched. Pre - preparation
  • Cans are filled with a measured weight or volume of product. A space is left at the top or the can will distort when sterilised. Filling of Ingredients Filling of Fish Filling of Beans
  • Pre - Processing Exhausting A process of pre – cooking using steam.
  • Filling of Medium Tomato Sauce Filling
  • Cans are sealed, under vacuum, using a double seam on the rim. Seaming
  • Washing Once sealed, cans are washed to remove any external particles
  • Cans are placed in a retort. Product is cooked at high temperature to achieve commercial sterilization. Retorting (Sterilisation)
  • Why no preservatives are needed • Commercial Sterilization • Vacuum (Barrier) • Steel/Aluminum can Therefore, long shelf life achieved without preservatives.
  • MYTH #2 Canned Foods are not nutritious
  • Canned Foods provides Nutrients Canned, cooked fresh and frozen fruits and vegetables: • Mineral and fibre content similar • Little effect on protein ,carbohydrates and fatty acids • Vitamin C losses but remains stable in storage • Vitamin A and E – little losses • Thiamin, B6 and Riboflavin - moderate losses
  • Canned Foods provides Nutrients Canned, cooked fresh and frozen fruits and vegetables: • Fibre and protein not affected • Vitamin C losses but remains stable in storage • Vitamin A and carotene – little losses • Folate – holds well during canning • Canning soften bones – higher calcium
  • Canned Foods provides Nutrients Canning of Fish Products: • Protein digestibility, biological value and net protein utilization – unchanged • Minerals ( Na, K, Mg, P, Cu, Fe, Ca) – some losses in canned tuna • Canning soften fish bones – higher calcium • Vitamin A & D – retained • No significant change in PUFA • Most of the fish constituents retained at acceptable level if over processing not employed
  • Canned Foods provides Nutrients Canning of fish: • Lipid decrease slightly • Protein appears to increase slightly • Remains a good source of Omega 3 and 6 and protein
  • Canned Foods provides Nutrients Summary Canned, cooked fresh and frozen foods: • Comparable in nutrients & fiber • No effect on fiber content; may make fiber more soluble • Little effect on protein ,lipids and most minerals • Vitamin C losses but remains stable in storage • Vitamin A and E – little losses
  • Canned Foods provides Nutrients Implications: • Fruits & vegetables: high in carotenoids, vitamin A, E, potassium ,folate and fibre, significant source of vitamin C • Canned fish: source of protein, higher calcium, rich in omega - 3 fatty acids • Legume and Beans : excellent source of protein, carbohydrates and fibre Conclusion: • Canned foods are excellent alternatives to fresh and frozen, providing nutrients expected from any food group • A food labeled as high in a nutrient, will not be altered by the form
  • Canned Foods Deliver “Phytos” Flavonoids: canned, fresh and frozen blueberries • Canning: no diminished levels of flavonoids measured • Some flavonoid levels: canned blueberries slightly higher • Juices in canned blueberries: deliver antioxidants • Blueberries: antioxidants , regardless of form Source: Oregon Health Sciences University Phytonutrient Study 2004, with analysis by U.S. Department of Agriculture Lycopene: tomatoes/tomato sauce • Stable during canning process • Higher content in processed tomatoes than fresh Source: University of Illinois, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Nutrient Conservation in Canned, Frozen and Fresh foods,1997
  • Canned Foods Deliver “Phytos” Antioxidants: canned tomatoes, carrots, corn, spinach and pumpkin • contribute more antioxidants than fresh and frozen • Carrots and spinach : enhanced bioavailability of carotene • Canning : Absorption of Lutein in corn enhanced by heat Source: U.S. Dept of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard reference, Release 18. Nutrient Data Laboratory Home Page. http://www.ars.usda.gov/ba/bhnrc/nld.2005 ; Dewanto. V, X. Wu and R.H. Liu Processed sweet corn has higher antioxidant activity. Cornell University. 2002.
  • Canned Foods Deliver “Phytos” Carotenoids : canned corn • Canning does not decrease carotenoids • Canned corn an equivalent source of carotenoids compared to fresh Source: Corey E. Scott, Alison L. Eldridge , Comparison of carotenoid content in fresh, frozen and canned corn, J. Food Composition and Analysis, 2005 Implications: • Canned fruits and vegetables an equivalent source of phytonutrients • Year-round source of phytonutrients
  • Today’s Dietary Recommendations • Food variety • From and within every food group • Nutrient-dense foods • Calories that count • “Good” fat sources (tuna, sardine, mackerel, salmon, etc) • Potassium sources (fruits, vegetables) • Protein and Iron sources (chicken, fish, meat, beans) • Whole grains • Foods with phytonutrients • Colors of health  Antioxidants, carotenoids, etc • Fiber (beans and more)
  • Food Groups: CANnections Vegetable Group Vary your vegetables Foods recommendations: • Any raw or cooked vegetable, 100% vegetable juice • Fresh, canned, frozen, dried Canned solutions : • Plenty of colored vegetables : carrots, tomatoes, corn, baby corn, peas, beans of all kinds, spinach, beets, asparagus, bamboo shoots, etc • No-salt added or low- sodium varieties • Vegetables with more potassium
  • Food Groups: CANnections Fruit Group Adequate fruits intake Foods: • Any raw or cooked fruit, 100% fruit juice • Fresh, canned, frozen, dried Canned solutions • Plenty of color: orange, peaches, cherries, blueberries, pineapples, lychees, longans, pears, papaya, apricots, etc • Varieties in juice, water or light syrup • Fruit, some more potassium
  • Food groups: CANnections Rice and Alternatives (Grains group) Make your diet carbohydrate based Foods: • Grains and starches • Fresh, canned, frozen, dried Canned solutions • Corn, pumpkin, potato, sweet potato, spaghetti • Wild rice, barley broth, couscous
  • Food Groups: CANnections Meat and Alternatives Group Go lean with protein, get your calcium-rich foods Foods: • Meat, poultry, fish, beans, eggs, nuts, seeds and dairy products • Fresh, canned, frozen, dried • Choose mostly lean and low-fat foods Canned Solutions • Salmon, tuna, mackerel, sardines with omega-3s • Lean proteins: chicken, turkey, crab meat and shrimp • Canned meat e.g. beef, mutton • Ready-to-eat beans of all kinds and peanuts • Evaporated and condensed milk
  • Convenient Nutrition  Prepare for any meal or snack with Canned foods from every food group  Convenient nutrition is always available • Fruits, vegetables • Nutrition-positioned foods  No-salt added (vegetables, broth, beans)  Packed in juice or water (fruit)  Evaporated fat-free milk, lite coconut milk  Packed in olive oil (tuna)  Portion control • Smaller cans • Servings amounts/sizes on label  Simple preparation • Ready-to-heat and eat solutions • Can innovations: pop-tops
  • MYTH # 3 Canned Food does not taste good
  • Canned Foods Deliver Flavor + Nutrition Harvested and packed at peak quality • Flavor is shelf stable: unopened, retains peak flavor for about 2 – 3 years • Great year round flavor: e.g. canned tomatoes Dishes made with canned, fresh and/or frozen ingredients: • Similar nutrient profiles • Similar flavor perception Implications: • Ingredients, not their form, determine a recipe’s nutrient content • Good preparation, not ingredient form, determines flavor qualities Source: University of Massachusetts Nutrition Study 2000, 40 dishes made with fruits, vegetables, soups, chili, meats, fish and chicken
  • More facts on canned foods • Ingredients – peak of freshness • Safe option • Financial Benefits
  • Summary “Canned Foods can be a safe and economical option to easily incorporate great tasting and nutritious foods into healthy and balance meals all year round.”