Information Literacy in an Open content world: developing guidance for academic colleagues

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Presentation with Alison Mackenzie at LILAC 2011. Discusses the results and trends from two academic staff surveys at Edge Hill University looking at academic staff awareness, use and expectations of open educational resources. Building upon the open content literacy framework by mapping it onto the SCONUL 7 Pillars model of Information Literacy - looking at IL through a ‘lens’ of open content creation. Asks What is the role of librarians in the developing OER/open content agenda? How confident do librarians feel about supporting academics in locating, reusing or remixing content? and How useful are literacy models in supporting understanding and decision-making of colleagues wishing to explore, create, reuse or repurpose open digital teaching and learning content


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  • For the purposes of this presentation OER and Open Content are used interchangeably
  • Develop an understanding of potential for reuse of learning objects at practitioner level and an improved understanding of training and support needsReForm = Dyslexia & Specific Learning Difficulties in Higher Education: Support Issues. 10 week, 15 credit, level 6 module With the lessons learned from ReForm we developed a framework to support engagement with open content, the acquisition of new skills and strategies and to manage the ‘messiness’ and iterative nature of digital content creation
  • 2009 = 582011 = 39
  • We have noticed some interesting trends in awareness of open content:There is greater awareness of open content in 2011 than 2009In 2009 there were many accompanying comments about how uninformed participants felt. 2011 significantly fewer comments in this area.
  • Have you ever uploaded content to JORUM? 2009 = 0 2011 = 5.9Have you ever searched JORUM 2009 = 31.6 2011 = 52.92011 only Have you ever downloaded content from JORUM = yes 4 individuals or 10.3%
  • Blip TV = videoJamendo = CC musicSpinXpress = CC mediaAlso using: iTunes-U, Humbox, specific publishers e.g. Wiley, StockXhng (images), TES, UCLAN OERs
  • Of those that responded to the previous question about awareness of CC licenses for content …2009: 6 said yes2011: 15 said yes
  • Of those that responded to the previous question about awareness of CC licenses for content …2009: 6 said yes2011: 15 said yes
  • Hadn’t included ‘anybody’ in 2001 survey
  • Insufficient skills was not asked in 2009
  • Where or to whom would you look for skills development, support & guidance in this area?Colleagues24HEA Subject Centre6Information Specialist8Learning Technologist21Other5 [content owner, in-house training, online communities e.g. ELESIG, within an informal setting]
  • 2009 = 582011 = 39
  • Information Literacy in an Open content world: developing guidance for academic colleagues

    1. 1. Alison Mackenzie and Lindsey Martin Information Literacy in an Open content world: developing guidance for academic colleagues LILAC conference 19th April 2011
    2. 2. Open Educational Resources: a definition Open Educational Resources (OER) are “digitised materials offered freely and openly for educators, students and self-learners to use and reuse for teaching, learning and research.” Centre for educational research and innovation, 2007
    3. 3. Why are we interested? • Sparked as a result of our JISC funded ReForm project testing assumptions of reuse/repurposing teaching content • Rapid growth of e-learning requires sustainable model of content creation • Perception that sharing content is complex is a barrier to cultural change • We found many colleagues lack skills to identify, acquire and adapt existing digital content • Also skills gaps in evaluating material and Intellectual Property Rights of found and own content
    4. 4. Snapshot of OER awareness & practices Snapshot of OER awareness & practices • A sample of EHU teaching staff surveyed 2009 and 2011 using BOS • Representation from all 3 faculties • Participants largely ‘early adopters’ of educational technologies • Where possible 2011 questions mirrored those asked in 2009 to enable trend analysis • Opportunities for free comment
    5. 5. Testing awareness of Open Content
    6. 6. Jorum awareness
    7. 7. Experiences of sharing and reuse (1)
    8. 8. Where content is typically found
    9. 9. Seeking permission for reuse
    10. 10. Testing awareness (1) 2009 2011 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 2009 2011 Awareness of Creative Commons licenses
    11. 11. Testing awareness (2) 2009 2011 42.9 60 0 20 40 60 80 100 2009 2011 Have you ever used CC licenced content? 14.3 26.7 0 20 40 60 80 100 2009 2011 Have you ever applied a CC license to your content/work?
    12. 12. Sharing one’s own content 0 10 20 30 40 For educational purposes Not for profit Attitudes to sharing own content beyond EHU: 2011 0 10 20 30 40 Not for profit With anybody Attitudes to sharing own content beyond EHU: 2009
    13. 13. Open Content Literacy
    14. 14. Guidance and support Where or to whom would you look for skills, support & guidance in this area?
    15. 15. Snapshot of OER awareness & practices Open Content Literacy Framework • Open Content Literacy Framework developed to support colleagues engagement with open content, the acquisition of new skills and strategies and to manage the ‘messiness’ and iterative nature of digital content creation • Review of SCONUL 7 Pillars model is providing an opportunity to map framework onto IL model – looking at IL through a ‘lens’ of open content creation
    16. 16. 7 Pillars through an Open Content ‘lens’ Identify Understands: • Concept of ‘openness’ in relation to educational resources and practices • That new open content is constantly being produced • The benefits which can be gained from creating, sharing and reusing content • Impact of local policy, infrastructure and support in creating a culture of sharing and openness • How to assess whether using open content or making your own content open will meet your needs Is able to: • Recognise decision to make one’s content open may involve others as well as self • Recognise a need for new skills in locating, creating, reusing, sharing content and identify the skills gap • Assess how open content could enhance the learner experience Scope Understands: • What material can and should be shared • The issues of IPR/copyright status and Creative Commons licenses in relation to re- use • The characteristics of different types of open content and how these may affect where they are published or aggregated • Who else must be involved in locating and/or developing content • Where specialist services and support can be found Is able to: • Identify material suitable for intended audience • Articulate reasons for using and making content open • Articulate when content should not be made open • Identify platforms and search tools for locating good quality digital content
    17. 17. Snapshot of OER awareness & practices Some questions remain … • What is the role of librarians in the developing OER/open content agenda? • How confident do librarians feel about supporting academics in locating, reusing or remixing content? • How useful are literacy models in supporting understanding and decision-making of colleagues wishing to explore, create, reuse or repurpose open digital teaching and learning content?
    18. 18. Snapshot of OER awareness & practices Contact: • Alison Mackenzie Alison.Mackenzie@edgehill.ac.uk • Lindsey Martin Lindsey.Martin@edgehill.ac.uk

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