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  • Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A Presentation: 70 minutes Lab: 60 minutes After completing this module, students will be able to: Monitor the Exchange Server 2010 messaging system Maintain the Exchange Server 2010 messaging system Troubleshoot problems with the Exchange servers Required materials To teach this module, you need the Microsoft Office PowerPoint® file 10135A_11.ppt. Important: It is recommended that you use PowerPoint 2002 or a later version to display the slides for this course. If you use PowerPoint Viewer or an earlier version of PowerPoint, all the features of the slides might not be displayed correctly. Preparation tasks To prepare for this module: Read all of the materials for this module. Work through the Module Review and Takeaways section, and determine how you will use this section to reinforce student learning and promote knowledge transfer to on-the-job performance. Make sure that students are aware that the Course Companion CD has additional information and resources for the module.
  • Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Although it might be obvious that performance monitoring is important, discuss why monitoring is important and why students should apply what they learn from this module to their Exchange Server 2010 environments. Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Discuss the main tools used for monitoring system health. Most enterprise environments already have a performance-monitoring and alerting system in place. In cases where a monitoring solution does not exist, Microsoft System Center Operations Manager 2007 or System Center Essentials (with the Exchange Server 2010 management pack) provide an easily deployable Exchange monitoring solution. Enterprise-class monitoring solutions also allow you to customize the data you want to collect, which can be helpful when tracking down specific problems or when default monitoring sets do not collect the appropriate data. You can use the Performance and Reliability Monitor to collect performance data when an enterprise monitoring solution is not available or is undesirable. Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Discuss each of the listed counters, why they are important to trend, and any suggested values that may indicate a problem. References Exchange Server 2007 Help: Monitoring Common Counters Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Discuss each of the listed counters, why they are important to trend, and any suggested values that may indicate a problem. Emphasize that these lists are not exhaustive, but rather are a suggested beginning. There are many other performance counters that may be beneficial to trend, depending on the messaging environment. Question: If any of these performance counters measured outside its normal range, what is the most likely cause? Answer: Slow client response will cause most of the mailbox performance counter data to be outside the normal range, whether the client is Microsoft Office Outlook Live or the full Microsoft Office Outlook client. References Exchange Server 2007 Help: Monitoring Mailbox Servers Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Discuss each of the listed counters, why they are important to trend, and any suggested values that may indicate a problem. Emphasize that these lists are not exhaustive, but rather a suggested beginning. There are many other performance counters that may be beneficial to trend, depending on the messaging environment. Question: If any of these performance counters measured outside its normal range, what is the most likely cause? Answer: Slow e-mail delivery will result in many of the transport counters being outside the normal range. References Exchange Server 2007 Help: Monitoring Hub Transport Servers Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Discuss each of the listed counters, why they are important to trend, and any suggested values that may indicate a problem. Emphasize that these lists are not exhaustive, but rather a suggested beginning. There are many other performance counters that may be beneficial to trend, depending on the messaging environment. Question: If any of these performance counters measured outside its normal range, what is the most likely cause? Answer: Most of the measurements that are outside the normal range are the result of a slow response from Outlook Live, Outlook clients, Internet Message Access Protocol (IMAP) and Post Office Protocol (POP) clients, Exchange Web Services, or the Autodiscover service. References Exchange Server 2007 Help: Monitoring Client Access Servers Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Discuss how to create a monitoring baseline by reviewing monitoring data over a full business cycle. A business cycle will vary for each business, but should include the busy and slow times. For some businesses, the busy times might correlate with the end-of-month accounting-close process or periods with notably high sales figures. Gathering a broad data set will provide enough data to determine the appropriate operating thresholds. Once you set thresholds are set and enable monitoring, a periodic review is important so that you can adjust the servers or thresholds to ensure proper monitoring. Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Conduct a group discussion in which students describe change management, and list the importance and benefits of having a clearly documented process. The students can provide real-life experiences or come up with experiences for using a process. Have the students describe change management, and then list the benefits of having a clearly documented process, perhaps by describing some real-life scenarios in which having a documented process benefited them. Question: How does your organization address change management? Answer: Answers will vary. Some organizations have a formal change management process, but these typically are larger organizations. Students from smaller organizations may not have a formal process. Question: Are there some situations where change management is more important than others? Answer: Change management is important in all situations, to prevent unintended consequences. However, for those changes that are likely to impact many users or high-profile users, change management is even more critical. Changes to mission-critical software, such as a messaging system, also tend to be more critical than changes to noncritical software, such as software for a backup server. Question: What are the benefits of having a formal change management process? Answer: Benefits include: Other organizational stakeholders are aware of changes, and can gauge the impact on their systems and staff. Multiple changes are coordinated to ensure that they do not conflict. Formalizing the change process ensures that it is consistent so mistakes are not made. Change management provides additional reviews, and allows time for additional planning, if required. Changes without a formal review often are thought out poorly, and organizations do not consider every alternative. As an IT professional, using the change management process can help deflect blame in situations where there are problems during a change. You can improve recovery times from change problems by including a formal back-out plan as part of the change management process. Question: Are there situations in which you cannot follow the normal change process? Answer: Yes, there are emergency situations in which services are broken and you cannot follow the full change management process. However, there should be an emergency change process in place to handle those situations. For example, if a critical service is down, it is not realistic to document and approve a detailed plan to solve the problem. The first priority is repairing the failed service. However, the changes made when repairing the service should be documented and evaluated afterwards to ensure there will be no negative effects on other services. Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Key message: Discuss the considerations for managing change in a production messaging environment. The process for change management varies widely between organizations. Ask your students how their organizations handle change management. You then can suggest how introducing a formal change management process can benefit them and their organizations. Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Lead a group discussion about the importance of maintaining software updates. Gather ideas from the student, using their real-life experiences. Ask the class the discussion questions. Write their answers on a whiteboard. Reference these answers during the rest of the lesson. Question: What is the difference between a hotfix and an update? Answer: A hotfix is a limited-release fix for a specific problem. To receive a hotfix, customers must have a support agreement with Microsoft, and cannot distribute the hotfix outside their organizations. An update is a broadly released fix for a specific problem, and can include security fixes. Question: Why should your organization deploy software updates? Answer: List several reasons why it is important to maintain software updates. For security updates specifically, it is essential to apply the latest software updates. Exchange servers are often externally facing, and are at risk of being compromised by unfixed security problems. Microsoft packages periodic Exchange Server security and nonsecurity updates into “update rollups”. These rollups contain numerous changes that have been regression-tested together, that may change functionality, but should address common problems. You should test these rollups thoroughly and apply them to ensure the Exchange servers work optimally. Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Key message: Describe how to determine the need for hardware upgrades. The step that students typically will skip is step four, which is the formal back-out plan if the software update causes problems. Stress that they should test the back-out plan. Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Key message: Describe how to determine the need for hardware upgrades. Exchange Server 2010 makes more efficient use of hardware than Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 and Microsoft Exchange Server 2007. Students may have less need to upgrade hardware than in the past. In particular, gains have been made in reducing disk activity. Disk capacity is one of the most commonly needed hardware upgrades. Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Key message: Describe the process for implementing hardware upgrades. Hardware upgrades are more difficult to test than software upgrades. Many environments do not have exactly the same hardware in a test environment as the production environment. However, stress that to the extent possible, testing should be performed on nonproduction hardware. Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Key message: There are many troubleshooting methods, which vary depending upon the type of problem that you are resolving. Having a repeatable process is important so that you can quickly resolve problems. Discuss the troubleshooting process and ask for input from the students on what processes work for them. Question: Why is it important to have a methodology for troubleshooting? Answer: Answers will vary. Troubleshooting a problem quickly and efficiently requires an organized process. Students from smaller organizations may not have a formal process, however learning to be efficient will help them. Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Key message: The students must be familiar with the built-in troubleshooting tools. Discuss each of the tools that you can use for troubleshooting problems and when you use them. Solicit responses from the students on other tools that they could use. Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • The goal of this discussion is to have the students come up with ideas about what to do in the case of a database or mailbox issue. Ask the class the discussion question. Write their answers on a whiteboard, and reference them during the rest of the lesson. Question: A database has gone offline. What process can you use to troubleshoot the problem? Answer: Answers may vary. The following is one suggested answer: Identify which databases have the problem. Review logs, and run the Database Troubleshooter tool. Review the probable causes of the problem. Rank causes by probability, and review possible solutions. Rank solutions by ease of resolution and impact to complete. Try the most probable and easily implemented resolutions until you resolve the problem. Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • The goal of this discussion is to have the students come up with ideas about what to do if a client-access issue occurs. Ask the class the discussion question. Write their answers on a whiteboard, and reference them during the rest of the lesson. Question: Outlook users no longer can connect to the system. What process can you use to troubleshoot the problem? Answer: Answers may vary. The following is one suggested answer: Identify which users are experiencing the problem, and when the problem began. Review logs for any involved Client Access servers. Run the Exchange Best Practices Analyzer. Review the problem’s probable causes. Rank causes by probability, and review possible solutions. Rank solutions by ease of resolution and impact to complete. Try the most probable and easily implemented resolution until you resolve the problem. Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • The goal of this discussion is to have the students develop ideas about how to handle a message-transport issue. Ask the class the discussion question. Write their answers on a whiteboard, and reference them during the rest of the lesson. Question: Users are reporting non-deliverable and slow-to-deliver outbound e-mail. What process can you use to troubleshoot the problem? Answer: Answers may vary. The following is one suggested answer: Identify which users are experiencing the problem and when the problem started. Use the Mail Flow Troubleshooter, message tracking system, Queue Viewer, Routing Log Viewer, and Telnet to pinpoint the problem Review the probable causes of the problem. Rank causes by probability, and review possible solutions. Rank solutions by ease of resolution and impact to complete. Try the most probable and easily implemented resolution until you resolve the problem. Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • In this lab, students will monitor and troubleshoot Exchange Server 2010. Exercise 1 Inputs: Students will be provided with information on the Exchange Server components that they need to monitor. Outputs: Students will have implemented a monitoring plan for the most important counters for each Exchange Server role. Exercise 2 Inputs: Students will be provided with a scenario that describes a database failure. They also will be required to run a script that creates the problem (or the virtual machine will need to be preconfigured with the issue). Outputs: Students will use the troubleshooting methodology that this module describes to identify the cause of the database availability issue and resolve the problem. They will verify that their solution addressed the situation. Exercise 3 Inputs: Students will be provided with a scenario that describes a client access failure. They also will be required to run a script that creates the problem (or the virtual machine will need to be preconfigured with the issue). Outputs: Students will use the troubleshooting methodology that this module describes to identify the cause of the client access issue, and will resolve the problem. They will verify that their solution addressed the situation. Before the students begin the lab, read the scenario associated with each exercise to the class. This will reinforce the broad issue that the students are troubleshooting, and will help to facilitate the lab discussion at the module’s end. Remind students to complete the discussion questions after the last lab exercise. Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Use the questions on the slide to guide the debriefing after students complete the lab exercises. Question: Was the Exchange Best Practices Analyzer helpful in troubleshooting the database error? When might using Exchange Best Practices Analyzer be a better fit? Answer: Exchange Best Practices Analyzer did not help you identify database errors. The Best Practices Analyzer is best used when troubleshooting intermittent errors, configuration errors, and proactively to ensure best practices are being applied. Question: Why do you need to run IISReset after reconfiguring Outlook Web App? Answer: After making the configuration change, the Exchange Management Console instructs you to restart Microsoft Internet Information Services (IIS) so that the new configuration options can be applied. Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Review Questions Question: Users are reporting issues with sending e-mail to a remote domain. You need to determine and resolve the problem. What should you do? Answer: Use the Mail Flow Troubleshooter and the Queue Viewer to review the queued messages and the status of the queues. Question: Recent organizational growth has resulted in two issues. It has caused several memory thresholds to exceed recommended limits, as well as the average read-latency threshold for the logical disk that stores the page file. What issue should you address first? Answer: First, add memory to the server. When there is not enough available memory, memory is paged out to the page file, which can lead to an increased amount of input/output (I/O) on the disk that stores the page file. Question: After reviewing the trend information retrieved from the monitoring system, you noticed that the processor usage for one of the four Mailbox servers is higher than average. What should you do? Answer: Determine which processes are using up the additional processor time, and check for changes in mailbox usage on the servers. To solve the problem you may be able to move mailboxes to other Mailbox servers or add additional processing capabilities to the current server. Common Issues and Troubleshooting Tips Point the students to possible troubleshooting tips for the issues that this section presents. Real-World Issues and Scenarios Question: A company has recently experienced growth because of a popular new product. The company has had numerous Mail server outages and downtime due to undocumented changes. What should the company invest in to ensure that it can support continued growth? Answer: To control downtime and constant changes that are required to keep the company growing, the company should adopt a change management process. Question: A database has gone offline, and the organization needs to troubleshoot the problem. A number of impatient users have mailboxes stored in the offline database. What is the best way to address the situation? Answer: Follow a proven troubleshooting technique. Stressful situations make it even more important to stick to a proven methodology. Module 11: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Question: An Exchange Server service pack was recently released, and the company has decided to deploy it. What should you do before scheduling the deployment? Answer: Thoroughly test and document the deployment and server backup. Testing should include functionality and compatibility testing with the company’s systems. Best Practices Help the students understand the best practices that this section presents. Ask students to consider these best practices in the context of their own business situations. Module 10: Securing Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A

10135 a 11 10135 a 11 Presentation Transcript

  • Module 11 Maintaining Microsoft® Exchange Server 2010
  • Module Overview
    • Monitoring Exchange Server 2010
    • Maintaining Exchange Server 2010
    • Troubleshooting Exchange Server 2010
  • Lesson 1: Monitoring Exchange Server 2010
    • Why Is Performance Monitoring Important?
    • Tools for Monitoring Exchange Server
    • Collecting Performance Data for the Exchange Server
    • Collecting Performance Data for the Mailbox Server
    • Collecting Performance Data for the Hub Transport and Edge Transport Servers
    • Collecting Performance Data for the Client Access Server
    • Using the Collected Performance Data
  • Why Is Performance Monitoring Important? Performance monitoring can help you :
    • Identify performance issues
    • Identify growth trends to improve plans for upgrades
    • Measure performance against service level agreements
    • Identify security issues and denial-of-service attacks
  • Tools for Monitoring Exchange Server The following tools can help you monitor system health:
    • System Center Operations Manager or System Center Essentials (with Exchange Server 2010 Management Pack)
    • Third-party monitoring products
    • Performance and Reliability Monitor
  • Collecting Performance Data for the Exchange Server Suggested performance counters for all Exchange Server roles:
    • Processor:
    • _Total% Processor Time
    • _Total% User Time
    • _Total% Privilege Time
    • System:
    • Processor Queue Length
    • MSExchange ADAccess Domain Controllers:
    • LDAP Read Time
    • LDAP Search Time
    • LDAP Searches time out per minute
    • Long running LDAP operations/min
    • Memory:
    • Available Mbytes
    • Pool Paged Bytes
    • Transition Pages Repurposed/sec
    • Page Reads/sec
    • Pages/sec
    • Page Input/sec
    • Pages Output/sec
  • Collecting Performance Data for the Mailbox Server Suggested performance counters for all Mailbox server roles:
    • LogicalDisk:
    • Avg. Disk sec/Read
    • Ave. Disk sec/Write
    • Avg. Disk sec/Transfer
    • MSExchangeIS Mailbox:
    • Messages Queued for Submission
    • MSExchangeIS:
    • RPC Requests
    • RPC Averaged Latency
    • RPC Operations/sec
    • RPC Num Slow Packets
    • RPC Average Latency
    • MSExchangeIS Public:
    • Messages Queued for Submission
  • Collecting Performance Data for the Hub Transport and Edge Transport Servers Suggested performance counters for the Hub Transport and Edge Transport server roles:
    • LogicalDisk:
    • Avg. Disk sec/Read
    • Avg. Disk sec/Write
    • Avg. Disk Queue Length
    • MSExchange Database ==> Instances:
    • Log Generation Checkpoint Depth
    • Version buckets allocated
    • Log Record Stalls/sec
    • MSExchangeTransport Queues:
    • Aggregate Delivery Queue Length (All Queues)
    • Active Report Delivery Queue Length
    • Active Mailbox Delivery Queue Length
    • Retry Mailbox Delivery Queue Length
    • Unreachable Queue Length
    • Largest Delivery Queue Length
    • Poison Queue Length
  • Collecting Performance Data for the Client Access Server Suggested performance counters for the Client Access server role:
    • LogicalDisk:
    • Avg. Disk sec/Read
    • Ave. Disk sec/Write
    • ASP.NET:
    • Application Restarts
    • Worker Process Restarts
    • Requests Current
    • Request Wait Time
    • MSExchange OWA:
    • Average Response Time
    • Average Search Time
    • MSExchange ActiveSync:
    • Average Request Time
    • MSExchangeFS OAB:
    • Download Task Queued
    • RPC/HTTP Proxy:
    • Number of failed back-end connection attempts per second
    • ASP.NET Applications:
    • Requests in Application Queue
    • MSExchange Availability Service:
    • Average Time to Process a Free Busy Request
  • Using the Collected Performance Data To use the collected performance data:
    • Create a baseline:
    • Monitor performance for a full business cycle
    • Note any peaks or troughs in the data
    Set warning and error level thresholds
    • Review growth trends regularly to:
    • Adjust threshold
    • Adjust server configuration
  • Lesson 2: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010
    • Discussion: What Is Change Management?
    • Considerations for Managing Change
    • Discussion: What Are Software Updates?
    • Process for Deploying Software Updates
    • Determining the Need for Hardware Upgrades
    • Process for Implementing Hardware Upgrades
  • Discussion: What Is Change Management?
    • How does your organization address change management?
    • Are there some situations where change management is more important than others?
    • What are the benefits of having a formal change management process?
    • Are there situations in which you cannot follow the normal change process?
  • Considerations for Managing Change
    • Define a process and use it consistently
    • Support the change management process
    • Use a process model like MOF to describe a system life cycle
  • Discussion: What Are Software Updates?
    • What is the difference between a hotfix and an update?
    • Why should your organization deploy software updates?
  • Process for Deploying Software Updates You can manage software updates by using WSUS Backup the server 4 Determine which updates are needed 1 Test and document the back-out plan 3 Schedule and install the software update 5 Verify and monitor the software update installation 6 Test and document the update in a compatible environment 2
  • Determining the Need for Hardware Upgrades
    • Investigate causes of poor user experiences
    • Monitor processor counters
    • Monitor memory counters
    • Monitor disk counters
    • Monitor network counters
  • Process for Implementing Hardware Upgrades Backup the server 4 Test and document the back-out plan Determine which upgrades are needed 1 3 Schedule and install the hardware upgrade 5 Verify and monitor the hardware upgrade 6 Test and document the upgrade in a test environment 2
  • Lesson 3: Troubleshooting Exchange Server 2010
    • Developing a Troubleshooting Methodology
    • Troubleshooting Tools
    • Discussion: Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers
    • Discussion: Troubleshooting Client Access Servers
    • Discussion: Troubleshooting Message Transport Servers
  • Developing a Troubleshooting Methodology Clearly define the problem 1 List the probable cause of the problem 3 Rank the cause by probability and define solutions 4 Rank solutions by ease of resolution and impact to complete 5 Try the most probable and easily implemented resolution until the problem is resolved 6
    • Gather information related to the problem
    • Turn up logging
    • Review logs
    • Try to reproduce the problem
    2 Reduce logging to normal 7 Document resolution and root cause for future reference 8
  • Troubleshooting Tools
    • All Exchange servers:
    • Best Practices Analyzer
    • Performance Troubleshooter
    • Network Monitor
    • Performance and Reliability Monitor
    • Test cmdlets
    • Hub Transport and Edge Transport servers:
    • Mail Flow Troubleshooter
    • Message tracking
    • Queue Viewer
    • Routing Log Viewer
    • Telnet
  • Discussion: Troubleshooting Mailbox Servers A database has gone offline. What process can you use to troubleshoot the problem?
  • Discussion: Troubleshooting Client Access Servers Outlook users no longer can connect to the system. What process can you use to troubleshoot the problem?
  • Discussion: Troubleshooting Message Transport Servers Users are reporting undeliverable and slow-to-deliver outbound e-mail. What process can you use to troubleshoot the problem?
  • Lab: Maintaining Exchange Server 2010
    • Exercise 1: Monitoring Exchange Server 2010
    • Exercise 2: Troubleshooting Database Availability
    • Exercise 3: Troubleshooting Client Access Servers
    Logon information Estimated time: 60 minutes Virtual machines 10135A-VAN-DC1 10135A-VAN-EX1 User name Administrator Password Pa$$w0rd
  • Lab Scenario
    • You are the messaging administrator at A. Datum Corporation. You need to configure basic monitoring by using the Performance and Reliability Monitor. You also must troubleshoot issues with a mailbox database and a Client Access server.
  • Lab Review
    • Was the Exchange Best Practices Analyzer helpful in troubleshooting the database error? When might using Exchange Best Practices Analyzer be a better fit?
    • Why do you need to run IISReset after reconfiguring Outlook Web App?
  • Module Review and Takeaways
    • Review Questions
    • Common Issues and Troubleshooting Tips
    • Real-World Issues and Scenarios
    • Best Practices
  • Notes Page Over-flow Slide. Do Not Print Slide. See Notes pane.