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  • Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A Presentation: 70 minutes Lab: 80 minutes After completing this module, students will be able to: Describe the infrastructure requirements to install Microsoft® Exchange Server 2010. Install Exchange Server 2010 server roles. Complete an Exchange Server 2010 installation. Required materials To teach this module, you need the Microsoft Office PowerPoint® file 10135A_01.ppt. Important: We recommend that you use PowerPoint 2002 or a later version to display the slides for this course. If you use PowerPoint Viewer or an earlier version, all the features of the slides might not display correctly. Preparation tasks To prepare for this module: Read all of the materials for this module. Practice performing the demonstrations and the lab exercises. Work through the Module Review and Takeaways section, and determine how you will use this section to reinforce student learning and promote knowledge transfer to on-the-job performance.   Note about the demonstrations : To prepare for the demonstrations, start the 10135A-VAN-DC1 virtual machine and log on to the server before starting the other virtual machines. To save time during the demonstrations, log on to the Exchange servers and open the Exchange Server management tools before starting the demonstrations. Additionally, connect to the Microsoft Outlook® Web App site on the Exchange servers, and then log on as Administrator. It can take more than a minute to open the management tools and Outlook Web App for the first time. Make sure that students are aware that the Course Companion CD has additional information and resources for the module.
  • Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Lead a discussion about the various components of Active Directory® directory service. The goal of this discussion is to ensure that all students have a good understanding of Active Directory. Because Exchange Server 2010 requires Active Directory to function, it is critical that students have at least a basic understanding of the Active Directory components and processes. You also can use this discussion to evaluate student knowledge and to encourage student interaction. Activity instructions: Sketch a diagram on the whiteboard of the Active Directory components, and point out the connections between each. Define and explain the functionality of the following terms: Domains. An Active Directory domain is a collection of computers that a Microsoft Windows® network administrator defines. These computers share a common directory database, security policies, and security relationships with other domains. An Active Directory domain provides access to the centralized user and group accounts that the domain administrator maintains. You can organize computer and user accounts within an Active Directory into a hierarchy based on organizational units (OUs). Forests. A forest is a set of one or more domains that share common configuration and schema information. A tree is set of domains that share the same Domain Name System (DNS) namespace. When multiple domains exist in a forest, there is an automatic trust relationship between the domain, which enables users in one domain to access resources in another domain. There can be only one Exchange Server organization per forest. An Active Directory forest is a security boundary. By default, no security accounts outside of a forest have any access in the forest. Trusts. Trusts enable users from at trusted domain to authenticate in another trusting domain. In a forest, all domains have trusts (either direct trusts, or transitive trusts) with all other domains in the forest. Domain controllers and global catalog servers : A domain controller holds a copy of the local domain database, which includes user accounts and computer accounts. It also is responsible for authenticating users and computers. Additionally, domain controllers respond to queries for information in Active Directory. A domain controller has directory information only for the domain of which it is a member, and does not have information about users in other domains. A global catalog server is a domain controller that also holds a subset of information from other domains in the forest. For example, a global catalog server has limited information about all users in a forest. Active Directory sites. Active Directory sites are defined as one or more IP subnets. Typically, all of the IP subnets in a given physical location are part of the same site. Sites do not typically encompass more than one physical location. All of the computers within a single site must have a fast network connection, which is usually 10 megabits per second (Mbps) or more, between them. Active Directory replication. Active Directory replicates information between domain controllers. It replicates domain information between domain controllers in the same domain and to global catalog servers in the forest. Active Directory also replicates configuration data and the schema between all domain controllers in the same forest. Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Question: Under what circumstances would an organization deploy multiple domains in the same forest? Answer : Some organizations deploy multiple domains to provide an administrative boundary. They want to be able to have one group of administrators with full control of part of the organization. Other organizations deploy additional domains to isolate replication traffic. In very large organizations, you can minimize the amount of replication traffic that is sent across a slow wide area network (WAN) link by deploying separate domains. Question: Under what circumstances might an organization deploy multiple forests? Answer : The primary reason to deploy multiple forests is to ensure that there is a complete security boundary between different parts of the organization's IT infrastructure. This could happen if an organization has multiple departments or business units that require isolation, or in the event of two organizations merging. Question: What type of information do domains in a forest share? Answer: All domains in a forest share the same Active Directory configuration information, Active Directory schema information, and a common global catalog. Question: What is the functionality of a domain controller? Answer: A domain controller holds a copy of the local domain database, which includes user and computer accounts, and it is responsible for authenticating users and computers. A domain controller has directory information only for the domain of which it is a member. Additionally, domain controllers respond to queries for information in Active Directory. Question: What is a global catalog server? Answer: A global catalog server is a domain controller that also holds a subset of information from other domains in the forest. For example, a global catalog server has limited information about all users in a forest. By default, the first domain controller deployed in a forest is a global catalog server, but you also can configure other domain controller as a global catalog server. You use global catalog servers for authentication, global address list (GAL) lookups, and universal group membership lookups. Question: What is the definition of an Active Directory site? Answer: The definition of an Active Directory site is one or more IP subnets. Typically, all of the IP subnets in a given physical location are part of the same site. Active Directory sites typically do not encompass more than one physical location. All of the computers within a single site must have a fast network connection, typically 10 megabytes per second (Mbps) or more between them. The Active Directory site configuration should be a logical representation of the physical network deployment. Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Question: What is Active Directory replication? Answer: Active Directory replicates information between domain controllers. It replicates domain information between domain controllers in the same domain and to global catalog servers in the forest. It also replicates configuration data and the schema between all domain controllers in the same forest. Question: How do Active Directory sites affect replication? Answer: Within an Active Directory site, replication of changes starts within a few seconds of the change being made on one domain controller. If an Active Directory site contains more than one domain controller, each domain controller also has at least two replication partners. Between Active Directory sites, replication can be scheduled, and happens every three hours by default. Also, all replication traffic between sites is sent through a bridgehead server in each site. References Understanding the Active Directory Logical Model: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=179867 Understanding Active Directory Site Topology: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=179868 Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Many students might be familiar with only the domain partition of Active Directory. You can start this topic by asking them what type of information the domain partition includes, and then you can expand the discussion to describe what other partitions include. Ensure that you discuss the replication scope for each of the Active Directory partitions. Emphasize that the configuration and schema partitions are replicated to all domain controllers in the entire Active Directory forest. References Active Directory Logical Structure and Data Storage: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=179859 Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • While you discuss how Exchange Server 2010 uses Active Directory, refer to the concept of partitions described in the previous topic. Stress the importance of the global catalog for Exchange Server deployments. All global address list information is stored in the global catalog. Both Exchange Servers and messaging clients cannot function without access to the global catalog. References Planning Active Directory: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=179870 Guidance on Active Directory design for Exchange Server 2007: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=179872 Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Review the importance of DNS and how all domain computers use DNS to locate domain controllers. Exchange Server services use DNS to locate a valid domain controller or a global catalog server. By default, each time a domain controller starts the Netlogon service, it updates DNS with service (SRV) records describing it as a domain controller and global catalog server (if applicable). To ensure that DNS records are updated properly, it is essential that all domain controllers use an internal DNS server that supports dynamic updates. After the domain controller registers the DNS records, computers running Exchange Server can use DNS to find domain controllers and global catalog servers. The service resource (SRV) records for domain controllers and global catalog servers are registered with several different variations so that computers running Exchange Server 2010 can find domain controllers and global catalog servers in several different ways. For example, DNS records can be registered by site name. This allows computers running Exchange Server to find domain controllers and global catalog servers in the local Active Directory site. DNS queries for resources are always performed for the local Active Directory site first. Consider opening the DNS console on the domain controller virtual machine to show students the SRV records that have been registered. Also, discuss the importance of mail exchange (MX) records for messaging. Messaging systems use MX records to locate mail servers in external organizations. If an organization does not have MX records registered in their external DNS zone, they will not be able to receive e-mail from the Internet. Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • While you describe the process for preparing Active Directory for Exchange Server 2010, reference the schema master and infrastructure master domain controller roles. Explain why these roles are important. Also explain the permissions that are required to run each of the commands listed on the slide. Mention that if you do not specifically prepare Active Directory and the domain before installation, it is prepared as part of a standard installation. Students might be confused about the process for upgrading Active Directory to the Windows Server® 2008 operating system or the Windows Server 2008 R2 operating system and the process for preparing the forest for Exchange Server 2010. Emphasize that these are two different processes, and can be completed in any order. Also, mention that organizations can upgrade directly from Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 to Exchange Server 2010 without first upgrading to Microsoft Exchange Server 2007. The Exchange Server 2010 schema changes include the Exchange Server 2007 schema changes. Mention that it is possible to install Exchange Server 2010 in a new organization without preparing Active Directory as a separate step. This is possible when you are deploying Exchange Server 2010 in an organization with only a single Active Directory domain. However, when you are performing transition from a previous version of Exchange Server, or when you are deploying Exchange Server 2010 in an organization with multiple domains, you must prepare Active Directory before installing the first Exchange Server. Mention that the following permissions are required to run the listed commands: /PrepareSchema  requires Schema Administrator and Enterprise Administrator rights. /PrepareAD requires Enterprise Administrator (and Exchange Organization Administrator rights if the Enterprise administrators have been explicitly denied access to the Exchange configuration) /PrepareDomain requires Domain Administrator rights References Exchange Server 2010 Help: Prepare Active Directory and Domains   Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • In this demonstration, you will use Active Directory Users and Computers to show the Exchange security groups in Active Directory. These groups are created when Active Directory is prepared for the Exchange Server installation. Do not spend much time describing the permissions assigned to each group at this point. Mention that Module 9 will provide details for each of the default groups. Also, you will use ADSIEdit.msc to show the Active Directory partitions and the Exchange Server information stored in each partition. You also will add the Schema partition to ADSIEdit.msc, and show some of the Exchange attributes that are added to the Active Directory schema. Preparation Ensure that the 10135A-VAN-DC1 virtual machine is running. Log on to the virtual machine as Administrator with the password of Pa$$w0rd . Demonstration Steps On VAN-DC1, click Start , point to Administrative Tools , and then click Active Directory Users and Computers . If necessary, expand Adatum.com , and then click the Microsoft Exchange Security Groups organizational unit. Double-click Organization Management , and then click the Members tab. The only default member of this group is the user that installed the first computer running Exchange Server. Members of this group have the necessary permissions to manage any aspect of the Exchange Server organization. Click Cancel . Double-click Recipient Management , and then click the Members tab. Verify that there are no group members. Members of this group are assigned full control permissions to manage the Exchange Server properties of user objects in Active Directory. Click Cancel . Double-click the View-Only Organization Management group, and then click the Members tab. The members of this group are assigned read permissions to the Exchange Server container in the Active Directory configuration partition, and read permission to all domains that have Exchange Server recipients. Click Cancel . Double-click the Discovery Management group, and then click the Members tab. The members of this group have permission to search all mailboxes in the organization for messages or content that meets specific criteria. Click Cancel . Close Active Directory Users and Computers . Click Start , and in the Search box, type adsiedit.msc , and then press ENTER. By default, when you open Active Directory Service Interfaces (ADSI) Edit in Windows Server 2008 R2, it does not display any partitions. Right-click ADSI Edit , and click Connect to . Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • In the Connection Settings dialog box, click OK . This connects ADSI Edit to the domain partition. In the left pane, expand Default naming context [VAN-DC1.Adatum.com] , and then click DC=Adatum,DC=com . The domain partition holds user accounts, computer accounts, and other domain specific configuration information. Objects with names that start with an OU are organizational units. Objects with names that start with CN are containers or other objects, such as users. You can verify the object type by looking at the Class column. In the right pane, double-click CN=Users . Notice that in the Users container, there are users and groups. Double-click OU=ITAdmins . Right-click CN=Andreas Herbinger , and then click Properties . This shows the attributes and values that are part of the Andreas Herbinger user object. Click Cancel . Right-click ADSI Edit , and click Connect to . In the Connection Settings dialog box, in the Connection Point section, in the Select a well known Naming Context list, click Configuration , and then click OK . This connects ADSI Edit to the configuration partition. In the left pane, expand Configuration[VAN-DC1.ADatum.com] , and then click CN=Configuration,DC=Adatum,DC=com . This displays the containers in the configuration partition of Active Directory. The containers contain configuration data used by Active Directory, applications, and services. Double-click CN=Partitions . This container holds a list of the Active Directory partitions. In the left pane, click CN=Sites . This container holds sites and their related configuration objects. Expand CN=Services , expand CN=Microsoft Exchange , and then click CN=AdatumOrg . In the right pane, you can see the containers that hold the various configuration information for Exchange Server. Double-click CN=Address Lists Container . This container stores configuration information for all address lists. In the left pane, click CN=Client Access . This container holds configuration information for the Autodiscover process. In the left pane, expand CN=Administrative Groups , expand CN=Exchange Administrative Group (FYDIBOHF23SPDLT) , expand CN=Servers . This container holds the Exchange Server objects. Right-click ADSI Edit , and click Connect to . In the Connection Settings dialog box, in the Connection Point section, in the Select a well known Naming Context list, click Schema , and then click OK . This connects ADSI Edit to the schema partition. In the left pane, expand Schema [VAN-DC1.ADatum.com] , and then click CN=Schema,CN=Configuration,DC=Adatum,DC=com . The schema container holds a list of classes and attributes that define the objects in Active Directory. Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • In the right page, click CN=ms-Exch-2003-Url , and then scroll down. Notice that many Exchange-specific attributes and classes have been added to the Active Directory schema. Close ADSI Edit. Question: How do you assign permissions in your Exchange organization? How will you assign permissions using the Exchange security groups? Answers will vary. Most small organizations will just have one set of administrators who will have full control of the Exchange organization. They can address the permission requirements by just adding the group to the Organization Management group. Organizations with more complex security requirements will need to use the other groups, or use custom role-based access control (RBAC) management roles. Question: Which Active Directory partition would you expect to contain the following information? User's e-mail address: Answer – Domain partition or global catalog. Exchange connector for sending e-mail to the Internet: Answer – Configuration partition. Exchange Server configuration: Answer – The configuration partition contains the Exchange Server-specific configuration information, but the Exchange Server computer object is also located in the domain partition. Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • The concept of server roles might be new to Exchange Server 2003 administrators, but Exchange Server 2007 administrators are familiar with server roles. If you have students who have Exchange Server 2003 experience only, be prepared to spend more time on this topic. Mention that the front-end and back-end servers in Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server and Exchange Server 2003 introduced the concept of separating server functions into multiple servers. If you have students with Exchange Server 2007 deployment experience, ask them how they have deployed the server roles in their organization. Mention that they may need to redesign some of the server role deployments because of some of the architectural changes to Exchange Server 2010. As you describe the Exchange Server roles, point out the graphics that represent each server role on the slide. These graphics will be used consistently throughout the course. References Overview: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=179873 Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • The deployment scenarios are organized into small, medium, and large organizations. Emphasize that the suggested configuration is typical, but not sufficient for every scenario. For example, some medium-size organizations may desire multiple servers for redundancy. If you have students in the class who are familiar with Exchange 2007, stress that in Exchange 2010, Mailbox servers that are part of a highly available deployment can also host other server roles. Mention that in Exchange Server 2010, except for the Edge Transport Server role, you can implement full redundancy for all other server roles with just two servers. References Topologies: Overview: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=179874 Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Question: When would you combine server roles on single servers in your organization? Answer : Answers will vary. Most small organizations might combine multiple server roles on one or more servers. Large organizations are less likely to do this. Question : What are the benefits and disadvantages of combining server roles? Answer : The obvious benefit is that you can deploy the required Exchange server roles while reducing the organization’s hardware costs. The disadvantage for large organizations is that it becomes more difficult to plan the server hardware requirements. If only a single role is installed on a computer, it is much easier to monitor server performance and identify bottlenecks than it is with multiple roles. Stress the new option in Exchange Server 2010 that enables multiple server roles to be installed on Mailbox servers that are part of a Database Availability Group (DAG). The option of deploying multiple roles on a highly available Mailbox server has not been available in any of the previous Exchange Server versions. Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Discuss the Exchange Online Services solution and how it provides e-mail services for organizations. If students show interest in this feature, refer them to the Additional Reading links. The “Migrate to Microsoft Online Services” whitepaper provides details on how to migrate mailboxes and global address lists from the local Exchange Server to Exchange Online Services. This paper is based on Exchange Server 2007, but many of the same processes apply. References Business Productivity Online http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=179875 Migrate to Microsoft Online Services http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=179876 Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Some students might not understand the schema master role, so if necessary, take a few moments to review the schema master role with students. Note that the schema master role exists once per forest, and that schema updates are performed through the domain controller that is the schema master. You also might want to review the concept of forest and domain functional levels. References Exchange Server 2010 Help: Exchange 2010 System Requirements Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Review the installation requirements that are common for all server roles, and then describe the server requirements that are unique to each server role. References Exchange Server 2010 Help: Exchange 2010 System Requirements Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Mention that because Exchange Server 2010 can be scaled to fully utilize the server hardware, large organizations might not consider it is as important to virtualize Exchange Servers. Mention that some virtualization products provide options for enabling high availability at the virtual machine level. Because Exchange Server provides several options for enabling high availability, you can deploy a highly available Exchange organization without using the high-availability options available in the virtualization products. In particular, if you deploy a DAG, and configure multiple copies of the mailbox databases, you should not use virtual machine-level high availability. Question: What are the benefits of virtualizing servers? Answer: Many organizations are using virtualization to significantly increase server utilization while decreasing hardware and power costs. Question: Discuss the benefits and disadvantages of using virtualization with Exchange Server 2010. Answer: Because you can add several thousand mailboxes to an Exchange Server 2010 server, you typically can utilize the hardware fully without virtualization. With the Exchange Server 2010 high availability models, this option becomes even more feasible. Emphasize that organizations should plan the hardware for virtual machines using the same criteria that they use for planning hardware for physical servers. References Microsoft Support Policies and Recommendations for Exchange Servers in Hardware Virtualization Environments: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=179877 Windows Server Virtualization Validation Program http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=179878 Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Mention that the Exchange Server 2010 setup program is easy to use and understand. Tell students that they will use the Exchange Server 2010 Installation Wizard to install Exchange Server 2010 in the lab that follows. Explain the significance of choosing to support Outlook 2003 or earlier clients. If you do not select this option, public folder databases are not be created on the server, and none of the system folders that these clients use will be available. Explain the selection of server roles during installation to the students. A typical installation includes the Mailbox server, Hub Transport server, and Client Access server roles. References Exchange Server 2010 Help: Perform a Typical Exchange 2010 Installation Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Discuss the command-line parameters available to install Exchange Server 2010. Mention that some of these commands, such as the /PrepareAD and the /DomainController options, are available only from the command line. References Exchange Server 2010 Help Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • In this lab, students will: Evaluate infrastructure and server requirements for an Exchange Server installation. Prepare the environment for an Exchange Server 2010 installation. Install Exchange Server 2010 server roles Exercise 1: Evaluating Requirements for an Exchange Server Installation In this exercise, students will evaluate infrastructure and server requirements for an Exchange Server installation. The main tasks for this exercise are as follows: 1.Evaluate the Active Directory requirements. 2.Evaluate the DNS requirements. 3.Evaluate the server requirements. Exercise 2: Preparing for an Exchange Server 2010 Installation In this exercise, students will prepare the environment for an Exchange Server 2010 installation. The main tasks for this exercise are as follows: 1.Install the Windows Server 2008 server roles and features 2.Prepare Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS) for the Exchange Server 2010 installation. Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Exercise 3: Installing Exchange Server 2010 In this exercise, students will install Exchange Server 2010 server roles. Before the students begin the lab, read each exercise’s scenario to the class. This will reinforce the broad issue that the students are troubleshooting, and will help to facilitate the lab discussion at the end of the module. Remind the students to complete the discussion questions after the last lab exercise. Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Use the questions on the slide to debrief students after they complete the lab exercises. Answers to the lab-review questions will vary depending on the organizations where the students work. If organizations have upgraded to the Windows Server 2003 operating system or Windows Server 2008 Active Directory, they may not need to make any changes to Active Directory. Most organizations will purchase server hardware that significantly exceeds the minimum required hardware for Exchange Server 2010. Ask students to describe the hardware they will purchase, and then follow with questions on the number of servers and number of mailboxes they will deploy. Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Preparation Ensure that the 10135A-VAN-DC1 and the 10135A-VAN-EX1 virtual machines are running. Log on to the virtual machines as Administrator with the password Pa$$w0rd . Important: When you start the virtual machines, ensure that you start 10135A-VAN-DC1 first, and that it starts fully before you start any other virtual machines. If you receive a notification that one or more services failed to start when starting a virtual machine, open the Services console on the virtual machine, and ensure that all Microsoft Exchange services that are configured to start automatically are started. On VAN-EX1, click Start , point to Administrative Tools , and then click Services . Scroll down to the Microsoft Exchange services, and expand the name column, so that you can read the service names. These are all of the services that Exchange Server installs. The services that Exchange Server installs vary depending on the Exchange Server roles that are installed on the server. Close Services. Click Start , right-click Computer , and then click Open . Browse to C:\\ExchangeSetupLogs . Double-click ExchangeSetup.log to open it. This log file contains information about the status of prerequisite and system-readiness checks that Exchange Server performs before the installation begins. This log also contains information about every task that occurs during the Exchange Server setup, and is the most complete log available for troubleshooting installation errors. Close Notepad. Describe some of the other files in this folder: ExchangeSetup.msilog. This file contains information about the extraction of the Exchange Server 2010 code from the installer file. Install-AdminToolsRole-[ date and time ].ps1. Setup generates this file, which contains the steps that Exchange Server uses to install the Exchange administration tools. Install-BridegeheadRole-[ date and time ].ps1. Setup generates this file, which contains the steps that Exchange Server uses to install the Hub Transport server role. Install-ClientAccessRole-[ date and time ].ps1. Setup generates this file, which contains the steps that Exchange Server uses to install the Client Access server role. Install-ExchangeOrganization-[ date and time ].ps1. Setup generates this file, which contains the steps that Exchange Server uses to create the Exchange Server organization. Install-MailboxRole-[ date and time ].ps1. Setup generates this file, which contains the steps that Exchange Server uses to install the Mailbox server role. InstallSearch.msilog. This file contains information about the extraction of the Search service that Exchange Server uses. Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Note : Other .msilog or .ps1 files may exist in this folder, depending on which roles you install on this server. Browse to C:\\Program Files\\Microsoft\\Exchange Server\\V14 . Describe the contents of the folders: Bin. Applications and extensions that you can use to manage Exchange Server. ClientAccess. Configuration files for the Client Access server role. ExchangeOAB. Contains the Exchange Offline Address book files that Exchange Web Services makes available. GroupMetrics. Contains information about distribution groups and distribution-group membership that MailTips uses. Logging. Various log files. Mailbox. Schema files, .dll files, database files, and database log files for the mailbox databases and public folder databases. Public. Several .dll and .xml files. RemoteScripts. Contains a single script used only by the Exchange Management Console. Scripts. Exchange Management Shell scripts that you can use to retrieve anti-spam statistics and perform other tasks. Setup. Extensible Markup Language (XML) configuration files and data. TransportRoles. Folders and files that the Hub Transport Server role uses. Working. Contains an empty folder. Close Windows Explorer. Click Start , point to All Programs , click Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 , and then click Exchange Management Console . Click OK to acknowledge that the servers are not licensed. In the left pane, expand Microsoft Exchange On-Premises , and then click Server Configuration . The server you just installed should always appear here, as should the list of roles you installed. In the left pane, click Toolbox . The Toolbox node includes tools that you can use to troubleshoot and repair Exchange Server. During installation, the only relevant tool is the Microsoft Exchange Server Best Practices Analyzer Tool. In the left pane, click Recipient Configuration . This shows all of the users and groups that are mailbox users or mail-enabled. Right-click Recipient Configuration , and then click New Mailbox . Accept the default setting of User Mailbox , and then click Next . Accept the default setting of New user , and then click Next . In the First name box, type TestUser . In the User logon name (User Principal Name) box, type TestUser . Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • In the Password and Confirm password boxes, type Pa$$w0rd , and then click Next . 21. On the Mailbox Settings page, type TestUser as the Alias , and click Next to accept the default mailbox settings. 22. On the Archive Settings page, click Next . 23. Click New to create the new mailbox. 24. Click Finish . 25. Close the Exchange Management Console. 26. Click Start , point to All Programs , and then click Internet Explorer . In the Address bar, type https://VAN-EX1.adatum.com/owa , and then press ENTER. In the Domain\\User name box, type Adatum\\TestUser . 29. In the Password box, type Pa$$w0rd , and then click Sign in . 30. Click OK to accept the default configuration for Outlook Web App. 31. Create a new message and send it to TestUser: Click New in the toolbar. In the To box, type TestUser . In the Subject box, type Test Message . Click Send . 32. Verify the message was received by clicking Check Messages in the toolbar. 33. Close Microsoft Internet Explorer®. Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Before you start the demonstration, describe how the Exchange Server Best Practices Analyzer works. Because the Exchange Server Best Practices Analyzer scan can take a few minutes, you might want to start the Exchange Server Best Practices Analyzer during a break and then start the scan. References Microsoft Exchange Analyzers: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=179879 Preparation Ensure that the 10135A-VAN-DC1 and the 10135A-VAN-EX1 virtual machines are running. Log on to the virtual machines as Administrator with the password of Pa$$w0rd . Demonstration Steps Demonstrate how the Exchange Server Best Practices Analyzer works by using the following steps: On VAN-EX1, click Start , point to All Programs , click Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 , and then click Exchange Management Console . In the left pane, click Toolbox . In the middle pane, double-click Best Practices Analyzer . Click Do not check for updates on startup . As a best practice, check for updates on startup to ensure that you have the latest best practices information from Microsoft. However, our virtual machines are limited to local network connectivity. Click I don’t want to join the program at this time . As a best practice, join the customer improvement program so that Microsoft can get anonymous feedback about how you use Exchange Server. This allows Microsoft to make future improvements that more accurately reflect the needs of their customers. However, our virtual machines are limited to local network connectivity. Click Go to Welcome Screen . Notice that this tool can scan a single server or the whole organization. Click Select options for a new scan . If necessary, in the Active Directory Server box, type VAN-DC1 , and then click Connect to the Active Directory server . The Exchange Server Best Practices Analyzer uses this server for read-only access to Active Directory. By default, it authenticates as the user who is logged on. In the Enter an identifying label for this scan box, type VAN-EX1 Scan . In the Specify the scope for this scan box, clear the check box for VAN-EX2 and VAN-EX3 . Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • If necessary, select Health Check . The Exchange Server Best Practices Analyzer can perform four types of scans: Health Check . This test checks for errors, warnings, nondefault configurations, recent changes, and other configuration information. This scan checks the health of your Exchange Server organization, and you can use it for troubleshooting. When you select the Performance check option, a sampling of performance data is taken over a two-hour period Permission Check . This test verifies that permissions are properly configured on the selected servers. Connectivity Check . This test verifies that network connectivity is available to the selected servers. Baseline . This scan allows you to select specific properties, configure baseline values for those properties, and then scan for servers to find deviations from the baseline values. Select Fast LAN (100 mbps or more) as the network speed. This setting does not have any influence on test performance. The estimated scan time is generated based on the network speed selected. Click Start scanning . You also can schedule scans for specific times. This scan gathers performance data or performs a weekly health check. However, to perform a scheduled scan, you must configure credentials under which the scan runs. The credentials are configured in the Connect to Active Directory screen in the advanced logon options. Running this scan will take approximately two minutes. After the scan is complete, click View a report of this Best Practices scan . The first tab displayed is the Critical Issues tab. This tab highlights issues that you should consider addressing immediately. Click the All Issues tab. This tab shows any issues that may be a concern. Click the Informational Items tab. This tab displays configuration information about your Exchange Server organization. Click Tree Reports . This view shows all of the configuration information that the Exchange Server Best Practices Analyzer collects. Click Other Reports . The Run-Time Log displays information generated during the collection and analysis of data by the Exchange Server Best Practices Analyzer. Close the Exchange Server Best Practices Analyzer. Close the Exchange Management Console. Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Ask the students if they have a standard troubleshooting process that they follow. If you have students who have troubleshooting experience, encourage them to describe how they would approach troubleshooting an issue such as an installation that fails. Emphasize the importance of reviewing the contents of any message that displays during a setup failure and of reviewing the setup logs. These sources of information typically can pinpoint the reason for the setup failure. Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Question: What additional software would you install on an Exchange server? The slide provides some examples of software that organizations often will install on Exchange servers. Ask students for additional examples of the types of software or configuration settings they normally include in a server build. Question: What additional software might you need to install in organizations with other messaging systems? In organizations with other messaging systems, such as Lotus Domino or X.400-based messaging systems, you might need to install some type of connector on one or more Exchange servers. Question: What are the potential issues with installing additional software? You should verify that all of the software that you install on an Exchange Server are Exchange Server 2010 compatible. If you install an older version of software on the Exchange Server 2010 servers, the software installation might fail or cause problems for the Exchange Server 2010 installation. Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • In this lab, students will verify that the Exchange Server 2010 installation was successful. Exercise 1 In this exercise, students will verify an Exchange Server 2010 installation. Inputs: Students will verify that the installation was successful. Outputs: Students will verify that the Exchange Server installation completes successfully by performing the following steps on it : 1. View the Exchange Server services. 2. View the Exchange Server folders. 3. Create a new user, and send a test message. Run the Exchange Server Best Practices Analyzer Tool. Before the students begin the lab, read the scenario associated with each exercise to the class. This will reinforce the broad issue that the students are troubleshooting and will help to facilitate the lab discussion at the end of the module. Remind the students to complete the discussion questions after the last lab exercise. Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Use the questions on the slide to debrief students after the complete the lab exercises. Answers to the second question will vary. Some organizations use the Exchange Server Best Practices Analyzer only once, after the initial deployment. Other organizations regularly run the tool. Recommend to the students that they should run the tool regularly, and especially when they are troubleshooting an issue with the Exchange deployment. Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Review Questions 1. The installation of Exchange Server 2010 fails. What information sources can you use to troubleshoot the issue? Answer: The two most important sources of information are the error message that displays when the installation fails, and the setup logs. In most cases, these sources of information will clearly indicate why the installation fails. A third option is to review the server’s event logs. 2. What factors should you consider while purchasing new servers for your Exchange Server 2010 deployment? Answer: The most important consideration is that you can install Exchange Server 2010 only on 64-bit hardware, which means that you must buy this type of hardware. Additional considerations include capacity planning and redundancy requirements. 3. How would the deployment of additional Exchange Server 2010 servers vary from the deployment of the first server? Answer: When you deploy the second server, you do not need to be concerned with the Active Directory prerequisites, as these will already have been configured for the first server installation. Additionally, you are more likely to install specific server roles if you deploy multiple servers. Common Issues Related to Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Identify the causes for the following common issues pertaining to installing Exchange Server 2010, and fill in the troubleshooting tips. For answers, refer to relevant lessons in the module. Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • Real-World Issues and Scenarios 1. An organization has a main office and multiple smaller branch offices. What criteria would you use to decide whether to install an Exchange server in a branch office? What additional factors should you consider if you decide to deploy an Exchange server in the branch office? Answer: The most important criteria is the number of users in the branch office, and the bandwidth between the branch office and main office. If the number of users is low, and there is enough available bandwidth for the users to have a positive experience with e-mail, you might choose not to deploy Exchange servers in the office. If the branch office has a large number of users, or if the client connections to Exchange servers in the main office are slow, you may choose to put an Exchange server in the office. If you put an Exchange Server 2010 server in a branch office, you must ensure that you deploy a Mailbox server, Client Access server, and Hub Transport server, and that you deploy a global catalog server in the office. 2. An organization has deployed Active Directory directory services within two different forests. What issues will this organization experience when they deploy Exchange Server 2010? Answer: Organizations with multiple forests need to decide whether to deploy two Exchange organizations, or a single Exchange organization and enable user accounts from one forest to access mailboxes in the other forest. If the organization deploys multiple forests, it will need to plan for the replication of information such as free/busy information between the forests. 3. An organization is planning to deploy Exchange Server 2010 servers as virtual machines running on Hyper-V™ in Windows Server 2008 R2. What factors should the organization consider in their planning? Answer: Firstly, the organization should be aware that they cannot deploy Unified Messaging servers on virtual machines. Secondly, the organization should consider whether to use Hyper-V to provide high availability for the Exchange servers, or to use the built-in Exchange high availability options. For Mailbox servers, we recommend strongly that you use DAGs. For other Exchange server roles, it is more feasible to use the Hyper-V failover component. Best Practices for Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Help the students understand the best practices presented in this section. Ask students to consider these best practices in the context of their own business situations. Module 1: Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Course 10135A
  • 10135 a 01

    1. 1. Module 1 Deploying Microsoft® Exchange Server 2010
    2. 2. Module Overview <ul><li>Overview of Exchange Server 2010 Requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Installing Exchange Server 2010 Server Roles </li></ul><ul><li>Completing an Exchange Server 2010 Installation </li></ul>
    3. 3. Lesson 1: Overview of Exchange Server 2010 Requirements <ul><li>Discussion: Reviewing Active Directory Components </li></ul><ul><li>Reviewing Active Directory Partitions </li></ul><ul><li>How Exchange Server 2010 Uses Active Directory </li></ul><ul><li>Reviewing DNS Requirements for Exchange Server 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Preparing Active Directory for Exchange Server 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstration: Integration of Active Directory and Exchange Server 2010 </li></ul>
    4. 4. Discussion: Reviewing Active Directory Components Active Directory components include: <ul><li>Domains </li></ul><ul><li>Forests </li></ul><ul><li>Trusts </li></ul><ul><li>Domain controller </li></ul><ul><li>Global catalog </li></ul><ul><li>Sites </li></ul><ul><li>Replication </li></ul>
    5. 5. Notes Page Over-flow Slide. Do Not Print Slide. See Notes pane.
    6. 6. Notes Page Over-flow Slide. Do Not Print Slide. See Notes pane.
    7. 7. Reviewing Active Directory Partitions Partition Type Description Domain <ul><li>All of the objects in the directory for a domain </li></ul><ul><li>Replicated to all domain controllers in a domain </li></ul>Configuration <ul><li>Configuration information for Active Directory and applications </li></ul><ul><li>Replicated to all domain controllers in the entire forest </li></ul>Schema <ul><li>All object types, and their attributes, that you can create in Active Directory </li></ul><ul><li>Replicated to all domain controllers in the entire forest </li></ul>Application <ul><li>All Specific application data that the application requires </li></ul><ul><li>Replicated to all domain controllers in the entire forest with a replica of the partition </li></ul>
    8. 8. How Exchange Server 2010 Uses Active Directory Schema Exchange object classes and attributes Global Catalog Exchange object attributes for mail-enabled and mailbox-enabled objects Exchange recipients Domain Configuration Exchange configuration Forests Exchange organization and Active Directory forest: one-to-one relationship
    9. 9. Reviewing DNS Requirements for Exchange Server 2010 Exchange Server 2010 requires: MX records to locate mail servers in other organizations  Host records to locate other servers SRV records to locate domain controllers   DNS Record Type Example SRV _ldap._tcp.Contoso.com. IN SRV 0 100 389 SEA-DC1.Contoso.com Host SEA-EX1.Contoso.com. IN A 10.10.10.10 MX MX 10 SEA-EX1.Adatum.com
    10. 10. Preparing Active Directory for Exchange Server 2010 Setup switch Description /PrepareAD /OrganizationName: ” organizationname” <ul><li>Prepares the global Exchange objects </li></ul><ul><li>Creates the Exchange universal security groups in the root domain </li></ul><ul><li>Prepares the current domain </li></ul>/PrepareLegacy ExchangePermissions <ul><li>Required if the organization includes previous versions of Exchange Server </li></ul>/PrepareSchema <ul><li>Prepares the schema for the Exchange Server 2010 installation </li></ul>/PrepareDomain /PrepareDomain domainname /PrepareAllDomains <ul><li>Prepares the domain by creating a new global group called Exchange Install Domain Servers </li></ul>
    11. 11. Demonstration: Integration of Active Directory and Exchange Server 2010 <ul><li>In this demonstration, you will review: </li></ul><ul><li>The Exchange security groups in Active Directory </li></ul><ul><li>The Exchange information stored in Active Directory </li></ul><ul><li>The Exchange attributes in the Active Directory schema </li></ul>
    12. 12. Notes Page Over-flow Slide. Do Not Print Slide. See Notes pane.
    13. 13. Notes Page Over-flow Slide. Do Not Print Slide. See Notes pane.
    14. 14. Lesson 2: Installing Exchange Server 2010 Server Roles <ul><li>Overview of Server Roles in Exchange Server 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Deployment Options for Exchange Server 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Hardware Recommendations for Combining Server Roles </li></ul><ul><li>Options for Integrating Exchange Server 2010 and Exchange Online Services </li></ul><ul><li>Infrastructure Requirements for Exchange Server 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Server Requirements for Exchange Server 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Considerations for Deploying Exchange Server 2010 as a Virtual Machine </li></ul><ul><li>Process for Installing Exchange Server 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Unattended Installation Options </li></ul>
    15. 15. Overview of Server Roles in Exchange Server 2010 In Exchange Server 2010, servers are installed with specific functional roles: <ul><li>Mailbox Server role </li></ul><ul><li>Edge Transport Server role </li></ul><ul><li>Client Access Server role </li></ul><ul><li>Unified Messaging Server role </li></ul><ul><li>Hub Transport Server role </li></ul>
    16. 16. Deployment Options for Exchange Server 2010 Small Organization Medium-Size Organization Large Organization
    17. 17. Hardware Recommendations for Combining Server Roles You can combine all server roles, except the Edge Transport server role, on one server You can combine server roles with Mailbox servers that are DAG members When combining server roles, reduce the maximum number of mailboxes by 20% Component Recommendation Processor cores <ul><li>Minimum: 2 </li></ul><ul><li>Recommended: 8 </li></ul><ul><li>Maximum: 24 </li></ul><ul><li>Plan on using half the processor cores for the mailbox server role </li></ul>Memory <ul><li>Recommended: 8 GB plus 2-10 MB per mailbox </li></ul><ul><li>Maximum: 64 GB </li></ul>
    18. 18. Options for Integrating Exchange Server 2010 and Exchange Online Services Exchange Online Services: <ul><li>Enables e-mail and calendar functionality hosted by Microsoft </li></ul><ul><li>Enables e-mail co-existence and migration of mailboxes and global address lists </li></ul><ul><li>Enables both on-premise and hosted mailboxes with Exchange Server 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Is part of the Business Productivity Online solution </li></ul>
    19. 19. Infrastructure Requirements for Exchange Server 2010 Infrastructure Component Requirements Active Directory <ul><li>Schema master must be running Windows Server 2003 (SP2), Windows Server 2008, or Windows Server 2008 R2 </li></ul><ul><li>All global catalog servers must be running Windows Server 2003 (SP2), Windows Server 2008, or Windows Server 2008 R2 </li></ul><ul><li>Domain and forest functional levels must be at least Windows 2003 </li></ul>DNS <ul><li>Must be configured to enable domain controller and global catalog server name resolution </li></ul>
    20. 20. Server Requirements for Exchange Server 2010 Software requirements: <ul><li>64-bit edition of Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard, or Enterprise Edition </li></ul><ul><li>AD DS management tools </li></ul><ul><li>Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5 </li></ul><ul><li>Windows Remote Management 2.0 </li></ul><ul><li>Windows PowerShell version 2.0 </li></ul><ul><li>Additional components based on server roles </li></ul>Resource Requirements Processor <ul><li>Intel 64-bit architecture </li></ul><ul><li>AMD64 architecture </li></ul>Memory <ul><li>2 gigabytes (GB) minimum </li></ul><ul><li>Additional memory required based on server role and load </li></ul>Disk <ul><li>1.2 GB free disk space for Exchange Server files </li></ul><ul><li>200 megabytes (MB) free on the system drive </li></ul>File System <ul><li>NTFS file system for all drives </li></ul>
    21. 21. Considerations for Deploying Exchange Server 2010 as a Virtual Machine <ul><li>You can deploy all Exchange server roles, except Unified Messaging servers, on virtual machines running on a supported virtualization platform </li></ul><ul><li>Virtualization high availability options are not recommended for Mailbox servers </li></ul><ul><li>Design virtual hardware using the same criteria as physical hardware </li></ul><ul><li>Consider the high-availability features in Exchange Server 2010 as an alternative to highly available virtual machines </li></ul><ul><li>Design the Exchange server deployment to fully utilize the server resources </li></ul>
    22. 22. Process for Installing Exchange Server 2010 To install Exchange Server 2010: Install the Exchange language packs Choose the option to install Exchange Server 2010 Run setup.exe from the installation source Choose the installation type Choose the option to enable Outlook 2003 or earlier clients Install prerequisite software Provide the Exchange organization name 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Configure the Client Access server external name 8
    23. 23. Unattended Installation Options Parameter Options Description /mode <ul><li>Install, Upgrade, Uninstall, Recoverserver </li></ul><ul><li>Default: Install </li></ul><ul><li>Specifies the Setup program actions </li></ul>/roles <ul><li>HubTransport, HT, H </li></ul><ul><li>ClientAccess, CA, C </li></ul><ul><li>EdgeTransport, ET, E </li></ul><ul><li>Mailbox, MB, M </li></ul><ul><li>UnifiedMessaging, UM, U </li></ul><ul><li>ManagementTools, MT, T </li></ul><ul><li>Specifies which roles to install </li></ul>/ServerAdmin <ul><li>User or group </li></ul><ul><li>Specifies an account with Exchange Server permission </li></ul>/NewProvisionedServer <ul><li>Server name </li></ul><ul><li>/ServerAdmin: User </li></ul><ul><li>Creates Exchange computer account for delegated installation </li></ul>
    24. 24. Lab A: Installing Exchange Server 2010 <ul><li>Exercise 1: Evaluating Requirements for an Exchange Server Installation </li></ul><ul><li>Exercise 2: Preparing for an Exchange Server 2010 Installation </li></ul><ul><li>Exercise 3: Installing Exchange Server 2010 </li></ul>Logon information Estimated time: 60 minutes Logon information Virtual machines 10135A-LON-DC1, 10135A-LON-SVR1 User name Administrator Password Pa$$w0rd
    25. 25. Notes Page Over-flow Slide. Do Not Print Slide. See Notes pane.
    26. 26. Lab Scenario <ul><li>You are working as a messaging administrator in Contoso Ltd. Your organization is preparing to install its first Exchange Server 2010 server. Contoso Ltd. is a large multinational organization that includes offices in Seattle, Washington, in the United States, and in Tokyo, Japan. </li></ul><ul><li>Contoso Ltd. does not have a previous version of Exchange Server deployed so you do not have to upgrade a previous messaging system. Before installing Exchange Server 2010, you must verify that the Active Directory environment is ready for the installation. You also must verify that all computers that will run Exchange Server 2010 meet the prerequisites for installing Exchange. </li></ul>
    27. 27. Lab Review <ul><li>What organizational changes must you make to Active Directory before you can install Exchange Server 2010? </li></ul><ul><li>What hardware configurations will you use for your organization’s Exchange Server 2010 servers? </li></ul>
    28. 28. Lesson 3: Completing an Exchange Server 2010 Installation <ul><li>Demonstration: Verifying an Exchange Server 2010 Installation </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstration: Verifying an Exchange Server 2010 Deployment </li></ul><ul><li>Troubleshooting an Exchange Server 2010 Installation </li></ul><ul><li>Finalizing the Exchange Server Installation </li></ul>
    29. 29. Demonstration: Verifying an Exchange Server 2010 Installation <ul><li>In this demonstration, you will see how to: </li></ul><ul><li>Configure post-installation services </li></ul><ul><li>View the default folder structure </li></ul><ul><li>View setup logs </li></ul><ul><li>Test e-mail and administrative tools </li></ul>
    30. 30. Notes Page Over-flow Slide. Do Not Print Slide. See Notes pane.
    31. 31. Notes Page Over-flow Slide. Do Not Print Slide. See Notes pane.
    32. 32. Demonstration: Verifying the Exchange Server 2010 Deployment <ul><li>In this demonstration, you will see how to verify the Exchange Server 2010 deployment by using the Exchange Server Best Practices Analyzer </li></ul>
    33. 33. Notes Page Over-flow Slide. Do Not Print Slide. See Notes pane.
    34. 34. Troubleshooting an Exchange Server 2010 Installation To troubleshoot Exchange Server 2010 setup: Verify the server hardware and software requirements Verify DNS name resolution Check the setup and event logs for errors Verify Active Directory functional levels and permissions    
    35. 35. Finalizing the Exchange Server Installation Configure Exchange Server security Install and configure additional software Configure settings that are specific to server roles   
    36. 36. Lab B: Verifying an Exchange Server 2010 Installation <ul><li>Exercise 1: Verifying an Exchange Server 2010 Installation </li></ul>Estimated time: 20 minutes Logon information Logon information Virtual machines 10135A-LON-DC1, 10135A-LON-SVR1 User name Administrator Password Pa$$w0rd
    37. 37. Lab Scenario <ul><li>You have completed the installation of the first Exchange Server at Contoso Ltd. You now need to verify that the installation completed successfully. You also should ensure that the installation meets the best practices that Microsoft suggests. </li></ul>
    38. 38. Lab Review <ul><li>What issues did you identify in the Exchange Server deployment by using the Exchange Best Practices Analyzer? </li></ul><ul><li>How will you use the Exchange Best Practices Analyzer in your organization? </li></ul>
    39. 39. Module Review and Takeaways <ul><li>Review Questions </li></ul><ul><li>Common Issues and Troubleshooting Tips </li></ul><ul><li>Real-World Issues and Scenarios </li></ul><ul><li>Best Practices </li></ul>
    40. 40. Notes Page Over-flow Slide. Do Not Print Slide. See Notes pane.

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