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Mark101   slidedeck - class 3 - consumer behaviour
Mark101   slidedeck - class 3 - consumer behaviour
Mark101   slidedeck - class 3 - consumer behaviour
Mark101   slidedeck - class 3 - consumer behaviour
Mark101   slidedeck - class 3 - consumer behaviour
Mark101   slidedeck - class 3 - consumer behaviour
Mark101   slidedeck - class 3 - consumer behaviour
Mark101   slidedeck - class 3 - consumer behaviour
Mark101   slidedeck - class 3 - consumer behaviour
Mark101   slidedeck - class 3 - consumer behaviour
Mark101   slidedeck - class 3 - consumer behaviour
Mark101   slidedeck - class 3 - consumer behaviour
Mark101   slidedeck - class 3 - consumer behaviour
Mark101   slidedeck - class 3 - consumer behaviour
Mark101   slidedeck - class 3 - consumer behaviour
Mark101   slidedeck - class 3 - consumer behaviour
Mark101   slidedeck - class 3 - consumer behaviour
Mark101   slidedeck - class 3 - consumer behaviour
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Mark101 slidedeck - class 3 - consumer behaviour

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  • What is Consumer Behaviour? the acts of individuals in obtaining goods and services, including the decision processes that precede and determine these acts. The study of consumer behaviour helps marketing organizations understand "why" people buy the products they do. From a competitive viewpoint, access to information about consumer buying motivation is crucial to developing persuasive message strategies—to know what buttons to press when communicating with customers.
  • five stages of purchase decision process
  • Problem Recognition - need is discovered and leads to a motivation to fulfill it
  • Information Search – in groups discuss the steps to buying a car, now toothpaste --> different? Routine Decision - Does not involve much money, takes limited time and has low risk. (toothpaste) Limited Decision - Involves more expensive purchases, takes more time, and has moderate risk. Complex Decision - Requires considerable time, effort and money, a proper evaluation of alternatives, and involves high risk. (car)
  • Evaluation of Alternatives - assessment is made based on factors such as price, quality, style, service or any other attribute judged to be important
  • Post-Purchase Evaluation cognitive dissonance: individual's unsettled state of mind that results from an action taken by an individual. Its presence suggests a lack of confidence in the decision
  • polleverywhere – factors / influences in your last purchase
  • Psychological Influences Maslow's hierarchy of needs and theory of motivation influences marketing strategy (See Figure 4.4 in the textbook). physiological needs, safety needs, social needs, esteem needs and self–actualization needs What level is this ad directed at?
  • Looking glass self and the ideal self are appealing to consumers. Males pursuing the body image (ideal self) of models in Maxim magazine are influenced by skin care messages from brands like Nivea for Men and Biotherm Homme. Real Self – You as you really are. Self-Image – How you see yourself. Looking-Glass Self – The way you think others see you. Ideal Self – How you would like to be.
  • Attitudes and Perceptions Selective Exposure – Noticing information of interest. Selective Retention – Remembering only what we want to remember.
  • Personal Influences - Lifestyles : activities, interests and opinions (AIOs) > psychographic profiles as a means of segmenting markets allows messages to be communicated that link a product to a particular lifestyle would you market this at the gay community specifically? Show how they did. Age and Life Cycle Technology Economic Situation
  • Social Influences - Reference Groups : common interest, member feels pressure to conform to the standards of the group, to "fit in." Family - emphasis today is on meeting consumer’s demands for convenience Social Class - division of people into ordered groups according to similar values, lifestyles, and social history Cultural Influences - behaviour learned from external sources, such as family, the workplace, and education that help form the value systems that hold strong sway over an individual. Go back to POLL results
  • SERVILE means turning your brand into a lifestyle servant focused on catering to the needs, desires and whims of your customers, wherever and whenever they are. - think IKEA moving weekend campaign
  • trendwatching.com 1. keep it simple 2. explain it 3. don't ask for commitment – think one night stand
  • What would your influencers be checksheet? What would the radio station listeners influencers be? What would loyalist cove marina's influencers be?
  • Transcript

    • 1. Presented By Lindsey FairConsumer Behaviour
    • 2. WHYpeople buy.WHATmotivates them.
    • 3. 5 stages of purchase decisions
    • 4. Weve got a problem!
    • 5. InfoSearch
    • 6. Evaluating the options
    • 7. ThePURCHASE
    • 8. Evaluating the options
    • 9. Influences
    • 10. Maslowshierarchyof needs
    • 11. Ideal Self
    • 12. WHATdo you see?
    • 13. Reference Group
    • 14. 2013Consumer Trends
    • 15. Servile Brands
    • 16. Virgin Consumers

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