Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Toolkit                 This document is an interactive PDF               ...
Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Toolkit                                                                   ...
ICT Toolkit                                                                                                  Introduction ...
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ICT Toolkit                                                                                                 Background    ...
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ICT Toolkit                                                                                                 Purpose and sc...
ICT Toolkit                                    Purpose and scope: possibilities that ICT offers                           ...
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ICT Toolkit                                                          Purpose and scope: ICT as an enabler                 ...
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ICT Toolkit                                       Purpose and scope: commercial opportunities                             ...
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ICT Toolkit                                     Purpose and scope: aspirations and objectives                             ...
ICT Toolkit                                                                    Purpose and scope: challenges              ...
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ICT Toolkit                                  Purpose and scope: benefits of using the Toolkit                             ...
ICT Toolkit                                                                                                  Reasons to us...
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ICT Toolkit                                                                                     Assurance checklists (30) ...
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ICT Toolkit                                      ICT systems: essential elements – ducting system                         ...
ICT Toolkit                             ICT systems: essential elements – ducting system                                  ...
ICT Toolkit                                              ICT systems: essential elements – chambers                       ...
ICT Toolkit                                       ICT systems: essential elements – chambers                              ...
ICT systems: essential elements –ICT Toolkit                                                                            ca...
ICT systems: essential elements –ICT Toolkit                                                                       cabinet...
ICT toolkit (2006)
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ICT toolkit (2006)

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EMDA ICT Toolkit for property developers, planners and the construction industry.

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ICT toolkit (2006)

  1. 1. Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Toolkit This document is an interactive PDF Click here to continue
  2. 2. Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Toolkit Print Back Next Using this document 1. Introduction 3–29 This document has been formatted as an interactive PDF to provide easy navigation online. You can also print this document if you choose to do so. To navigate through the document click on the blue boxes to the left. A 2. Assurance checklists 30 menu list is then shown on the left-hand side of every page. Each menu item is linked to the associated section/sub-section of the Toolkit. As you view the various sections, the related section in the menu list will be highlighted to help you easily identify where you are. 3. Guidance 31–84 Next and Back arrows are also provided (as appropriate) to allow you to navigate through the pages one at a time. You can also click Back to main contents page at any time to return to this page. A detailed breakdown of the contents is also shown in the Bookmark 4. Case studies 85–110 pane to the far left of the screen. Click the plus sign next to a topic to expand sub-topics – clicking a topic will take you directly to it. You can print the whole document or portions (specifying the page numbers) of the document by choosing Print from the Acrobat File menu 5. Standards and links 111–122 or by clicking on the printer icon Print, which is provided at the beginning of each section. External links are shown as red or blue – these links will open on a separate window and will take you to related material and further detail 6. Glossary 123–129 located on external Web sites. In order to return to this document close the window once you have finished viewing the relevant Web site or document.Version 2.0 (21-02-06) © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  3. 3. ICT Toolkit Introduction (3–29) Back to main contents page Print Back Next Introduction This introductory section outlines the purpose and scope of the Toolkit, the reasons to use it, how to use it and it provides answers to frequently asked questions (FAQs). The section presents the Background rationale for the Toolkit and the principles it follows. Most importantly, it identifies the benefits to both Purpose and scope local authorities (public sector) and construction developers (private sector or public-private Reasons to use it partnerships) of closer working using the Toolkit, and thereby the reason that investment has been How to use it made in bringing this Toolkit to publication. FAQs This section is structured as follows:Assurance checklists Section* PagesGuidance Background 4–6 Purpose and scope 7–19Case studies Reasons to use it 20–21Standards and links How to use it 22–26Glossary FAQs 27–29 *Click on the above sections (in blue) or on the menu items on the left to go to the relevant sections. Alternatively, you can use the Next and Back arrows to navigate through the pages one at a time. You can also click Back to main contents page at any time to return to the main contents page. The bookmark pane can also be used to navigate through the various sections.Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 3 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  4. 4. ICT Toolkit Background Back to main contents page Back Next Introduction The Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Toolkit was commissioned by the East Midlands Development Agency (emda) in September 2004 for use by planning authorities and Background construction developers. Subsequently, the South East of England Development Agency (SEEDA) Purpose and scope funded an update of the Toolkit in January 2006. Reasons to use it The Toolkit is intended to ensure that new property developments (from individual properties right up How to use it to major urban developments) are planned, designed and built with ICT in mind, based on FAQs established best practice. This will result in an improvement in the property stock and it will bring the benefits of ICT to communities and businesses.Assurance checklists To help the user, the Toolkit:Guidance – offers informed discussion about ICT in property development, highlighting benefits and raising issuesCase studies – prepares you to ask appropriate questions – helps you to decide what ICT might be neededStandards and links – provides clarity about the steps to take that enable the specification of your requirements1Glossary The Toolkit has been produced by a leading independent ICT consultancy, the Analysys Mason Group. The group advises users, providers and regulators of ICT services, including local authorities and construction developers. Further information explaining ICT in the context of planning and regeneration is available from the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister’s (ODPM) Web site. 1The Toolkit does not provide the specifications for you; such detail depends on the size and scale of any particular development, the funding arrangements and the user requirements, i.e. it is for the reader to decide the ICT requirementsVersion 2.0 (21-02-06) 4 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  5. 5. ICT Toolkit Background (Contd.) Back to main contents page Back Next Introduction The Toolkit is promoted by emda and SEEDA, which will encourage its intentions and contents to be incorporated into ongoing activities in their regions and, in particular: Background Purpose and scope – regional planning activities including: Reasons to use it How to use it » the Regional Spatial Strategy (RSS) documents known as the East Midlands FAQs Regional Plan and the South East Plan, prepared by the East Midlands Regional Assembly (EMRA) and the South East of England Regional Assembly (SEERA)Assurance checklists respectively » the Regional Economic Strategy (RES) documents, prepared by emda and SEEDAGuidance – Sub-regional Spatial Strategies, Local Development Frameworks of local planningCase studies authorities and Supplementary Planning DocumentsStandards and links – construction developer practices, in particular, significant construction developments benefiting from public-sector intervention will be encouraged to use the ToolkitGlossary An overview of how the ICT Toolkit could be positioned within the statutory planning guidance hierarchy is shown in Exhibit 1 on the following page.Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 5 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  6. 6. ICT Toolkit Background (Contd.) Back to main contents page Back Next Introduction RESPONSIBLE BODY KEY PLANNING GUIDANCE OTHER GUIDANCE/INFLUENCERS Background Purpose and scope National European Directives Reasons to use it ODPM Planning Policy Statements National Planning Legislation How to use it FAQs Regional Economic StrategyAssurance checklists Statutory Consultee Role Regional RegionalGuidance Assembly Regional Spatial Strategy for Significant DevelopmentsCase studies ICT Supplementary Planning TOOLKIT DocumentsStandards and links (Local Authorities)Glossary Local Local Public sector involvement Authorities Local Development Frameworks in developments, e.g. Regional Development Agency, Urban Regeneration Companies Exhibit 1: Flow diagram overview [Source: Analysys Mason Group]Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 6 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  7. 7. ICT Toolkit Purpose and scope Back to main contents page Back Next Introduction The purpose of the Toolkit is to help planners and developers better understand the part that ICT has to play in construction developments. Background Purpose and scope The Toolkit provides a framework for an appropriate approach to ICT advancement within construction developments. This section covers the following aspects: Reasons to use it How to use it – the possibilities that ICT offers (8–11) FAQs – benefits of ICT as an enabler (12–13)Assurance checklists – identifies commercial opportunities that may be exploited (14)Guidance – highlights risks and issues that can be avoided (15)Case studies – outlines the aspirations and objectives for the Toolkit (16) – acknowledges the challenges that exist (17)Standards and links – identifies the target users of the Toolkit (18)Glossary – highlights the benefits of using the Toolkit (19) *Click on the above sections (in blue) to go to the relevant sub-sections. Alternatively, you can use the Next and Back arrows to navigate through the pages one at a time. You can also click Back to purpose and scope list to return to this contents page. The bookmark pane can also be used to navigate through the various sections.Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 7 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  8. 8. ICT Toolkit Purpose and scope: possibilities that ICT offers Back to main contents page Back Next Introduction The possibilities that arise from the provision of advanced ICT infrastructure are introduced through a number of interconnected hierarchies. Exhibit 2 below provides an overview of the different levels Background in this hierarchy: Purpose and scope Benefit Reasons to use it How to use it Other More family benefits time FAQsAssurance checklists Level 3 Other EmploymentGuidance services (tele-working)Case studies Level 2 Other ICT Internet accessStandards and links infrastructure (broadband)Glossary Level 1 Advanced ICT infrastructure Exhibit 2: Interconnected hierarchy overview of ICT possibilities [Source: Analysys Mason Group] The above hierarchy can be used to demonstrate many different benefits, supported at its foundations by advanced ICT infrastructure; this is the reason why ICT infrastructure is of such interest. In what follows, we provide an overview of some of the possibilities that ICT offers at each of these levels.Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 8 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  9. 9. ICT Toolkit Purpose and scope: possibilities that ICT offers (Contd.) Back to main contents page Back to purpose and scope list Back Next Introduction Level Possibilities that ICT offers Background Purpose and scope Level 1 At Level 1, the advanced ICT infrastructure provides the foundations to support the delivery of services, both from an individual and from a wider social perspective. The possibilities that ICT Reasons to use it offers at this level are shown in Exhibit 3 below, with Internet access (broadband) highlighted to How to use it connect to the next level. FAQs Access control Environmental controls Internet access (broadband) MonitoringAssurance checklists Intrusion Flood CCTV alarms alarms Fire alarms Telephony Video/audio Warnings ControllingGuidance Protection ProtectionCase studies (security) (safety) Content TransactionsStandards and links Building coverage Personal useGlossary External/social Internal/individual Advanced ICT infrastructure (Level 1) Exhibit 3: Possible uses of advanced ICT infrastructure [Source: Analysys Mason Group]Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 9 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  10. 10. ICT Toolkit Purpose and scope: possibilities that ICT offers (Contd.) Back to main contents page Back to purpose and scope list Back Next Introduction Level Possibilities that ICT offers Background Purpose and scope Level 2 At Level 2, the delivery of services supports the use of ICT. Exhibit 4 below shows the possibilities for use of the Internet access (broadband), with employment (tele-working) highlighted to connect Reasons to use it to the next level. How to use it FAQs Employment Private sector (tele-working) e-commerce Content (language)Assurance checklists Public Education & Employment Content Content sector Community skills (new) Marketing Networking (new) (disability)Guidance To information ToCase studies and services opportunities Business Personal development developmentStandards and links Improved accessibility Improved useGlossary External/social Internal/individual Internet access (broadband) (Level 2) Exhibit 4: Possible uses of Internet access (broadband) [Source: Analysys Mason Group]Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 10 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  11. 11. ICT Toolkit Purpose and scope: possibilities that ICT offers (Contd.) Back to main contents page Back to purpose and scope list Back Next Introduction Level Possibilities that ICT offers Background Purpose and scope Level 3 At Level 3, the uses support the achievable benefits. Exhibit 5 below shows the possibilities for the benefits that could be achieved by employment (tele-working) at this level. ‘More family time’ Reasons to use it appears highlighted to demonstrate that advanced ICT infrastructure is ultimately connected to a How to use it personal benefit, as originally shown in Exhibit 2 on page 8. FAQs Reduced road Reduced road Reduced travelling Reduced travelling building accidents costs costsAssurance checklists Reduced Reduced Reduced Reduced Higher More More pollution noise asthma stress productivity flexibility family timeGuidance Reduced ReducedCase studies environmental costs health costs Improved Improved employer benefits employee benefitsStandards and links Reduced congestion Improved businesses and commutingGlossary and lifestyles External/social Internal/individual Employment (tele-working) (Level 3) Exhibit 5: Possible benefits of employment (tele-working) [Source: Analysys Mason Group]Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 11 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  12. 12. ICT Toolkit Purpose and scope: ICT as an enabler Back to main contents page Back to purpose and scope list Back Next Introduction ICT is an enabler to meeting requirements such as: Background • Objectives of the European Union i2010 initiative2 to ensure that businesses, governments Purpose and scope and citizens throughout Europe make the best use of ICT in order to improve industrial competitiveness, support growth and the creation of jobs, as well as to address key societal Reasons to use it challenges, for example: How to use it – aiming to have 50% of all EU households connected to high-speed broadband networks FAQs with a performance of at least 10Mbit/sAssurance checklists – providing better and more accessible ICT-enabled public services for citizens such as using ICT to help care for the elderly in the homeGuidance – defining e-business policies to encourage ICT adoption, particularly by SMEs • Objectives of the ODPM’s Planning Policy Statement 1 for creating sustainable communitiesCase studies with high-quality design and satisfying environmental requirements. Such objectives are achieved through, for example:Standards and links – meeting economic aims of planning authorities such that they have regard to the importance of encouraging industrial, commercial and retail development if the economyGlossary is to prosper and provide for improved productivity, choice and competition, particularly when technological and other requirements of modern business are changing rapidly – providing safer environments in which to live, frequently supported by the use of Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) enabled by ICT – satisfying the EU Energy Performance of Buildings Directive using building-control systems enabled by pre-installed ICT infrastructure 2 http://europa.eu.int/information_society/eeurope/i2010/index_en.htm.Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 12 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  13. 13. ICT Toolkit Purpose and scope: ICT as an enabler (Contd.) Back to main contents page Back to purpose and scope list Back Next Introduction • Objectives of Regional Plans published by Regional Assemblies, which outline the regional priorities for ICT, for example to: Background – enable and promote the take up of ICT by businesses, the public and voluntary sectors, Purpose and scope and the local communities, and to encourage the innovative use of ICT to improve Reasons to use it productivity and competitiveness and flexible working practices How to use it – promote and support the introduction of accessible, effective and socially inclusive e- FAQs services and e-education • Objectives of Regional Economic Strategy plans published by Regional DevelopmentAssurance checklists Agencies to:Guidance – improve competitiveness, growth and productivity by encouraging businesses, particularly SMEs, to take up ICTCase studies – increase ICT access to, and usage by, communities living in deprived and rural areas – provide access to next-generation technologies and servicesStandards and links – increase ICT skill levels, building employability and entrepreneurial capabilities by providing business support and training servicesGlossary – ensure that appropriate levels of ICT infrastructure are deployed for employment-related land and development schemes by promoting the development principle that all new build projects should consider the ICT connectivity needs as part of the design process • User needs in business (improved economic performance) and residential (improved social interaction and flexible working options) spaces by, for example: – conducting business using electronic media (e-business) – using broadband Internet for self-learning, access to government services and remote working .Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 13 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  14. 14. ICT Toolkit Purpose and scope: commercial opportunities Back to main contents page Back to purpose and scope list Back Next Introduction There are a number of commercial opportunities that may be exploited through ICT: Background • Through ICT, a number of tenant or site services can be extended, for example: Purpose and scope – alarm monitoring Reasons to use it How to use it – combined telephony and broadband services FAQs • ICT can also increase, or at least maintain, the attractiveness of properties or sites3 by, for example:Assurance checklists – achieving higher sale/rent prices to purchasers/tenantsGuidance – improving occupancy rates – reducing voidsCase studies – increasing speed of occupationStandards and linksGlossary 3“Does connectivity add value to commercial real estate? The case of managed conventional offices,” The College of Estate Management, September 2005, http://www.cem.ac.uk/research/reports_2005.asp.Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 14 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  15. 15. ICT Toolkit Purpose and scope: risks and issues Back to main contents page Back to purpose and scope list Back Next Introduction If planned early in the development process, ICT can help avoid known risks and issues such as: Background – costly retrofit and disruption after development completion, for example: disruption caused Purpose and scope by the installation of telecommunications cabling infrastructure in a building after Reasons to use it occupancy; disruptive trench digging after landscaping has finished How to use it – poor economic performance through lack of ICT, for example: missing out on business FAQs relocationsAssurance checklists – meeting possible future mandatory requirements, for example: ODPM’s Building Regulations Draft Q; mandatory ducting to the buildingGuidanceCase studiesStandards and linksGlossaryVersion 2.0 (21-02-06) 15 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  16. 16. ICT Toolkit Purpose and scope: aspirations and objectives Back to main contents page Back to purpose and scope list Back Next Introduction The aspirations and objectives of the Toolkit are outlined below: Background – all developments will include consideration of ICT in the early planning stages as part Purpose and scope of ‘business as usual’ Reasons to use it How to use it – all developments will incorporate ICT infrastructure as a standard service component FAQs like water and electricity such that the ICT Toolkit influence can be reduced to a minimumAssurance checklists – ICT infrastructure and service providers will make strategic investment decisions to support strategic regional planning aimsGuidance – ICT will become a part of continuous professional development for the town andCase studies country planning communityStandards and links – ICT will be used to help automate the planning process itself The public sector has a vested interest in seeing these aspirations and objectives met and so hasGlossary invested in developing this Toolkit as part of its wider commitment to ICT and to ease the barriers that exist with incorporating ICT in developments.Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 16 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  17. 17. ICT Toolkit Purpose and scope: challenges Back to main contents page Back to purpose and scope list Back Next Introduction Some telecommunications operators and developers view that they have no incentives to install ICT in developments, only the need to meet their minimum or obliged requirements, for example: Background Purpose and scope – telecommunications operators have code powers and so can dig up the streets to provide Reasons to use it a requested service at any time How to use it FAQs – health and safety or environmental legislation does not specifically require ICT infrastructure or services, so developers can minimise costs by not installing ICTAssurance checklists infrastructureGuidance – whilst the normal expectation of property users and owners is that developers pre-install utility services such as water and electricity, this is not currently the case for ICT inCase studies general, other than basic telephony and televisionStandards and links The telecommunications operator BT has a universal service obligation (USO) to provide access to the public telephony network for all reasonable requests, which means it may provide its own cabling infrastructure despite the existence of pre-installed facilities. This can be a barrier toGlossary investment by developers. Local authorities charge business rates to telecommunications operators for fibre-optic based services, reducing the likelihood of multiple operators providing services to a development. This can be a barrier to investment by operators.Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 17 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  18. 18. ICT Toolkit Purpose and scope: target users Back to main contents page Back to purpose and scope list Back Next Introduction The Toolkit is aimed at those with an interest in ICT in developments, in particular to: Background – the public sector, such as Purpose and scope » local authority planning Reasons to use it » economic development How to use it » regeneration and building control departments FAQs – developers and their ICT partners or suppliersAssurance checklists But the Toolkit is also aimed at:Guidance – organisations involved in economic development and regeneration, both public and private, such as Urban Regeneration Companies and other local delivery vehiclesCase studies – ICT operators and service providersStandards and links It is important to note that the Toolkit, in its entirety, is designed to be used by:Glossary – local authorities on their own, or construction developers on their own; but ideally, local authorities and construction developers togetherVersion 2.0 (21-02-06) 18 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  19. 19. ICT Toolkit Purpose and scope: benefits of using the Toolkit Back to main contents page Back to purpose and scope list Back Next Introduction The Toolkit will provide the following for those involved with ICT in developments: Background – an information source that is necessary and sufficient to be used directly, but with onward Purpose and scope references for full details or background Reasons to use it How to use it – a development aid that can be the starting point for newcomers and is an assurance FAQs mechanism for all usersAssurance checklists – a means of creating audit records for assurance exercisesGuidanceCase studiesStandards and linksGlossaryVersion 2.0 (21-02-06) 19 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  20. 20. ICT Toolkit Reasons to use it Back to main contents page Back Next Introduction The Toolkit will assist those involved with ICT developments to improve the following: Background • Economy – in how cheaply such activities are determined and established by providing a Purpose and scope concise and logical overview of the key aspects directly and by reference to other aspects. The Reasons to use it subject of ICT in developments is a complex area that has not been brought together in a single How to use it place like this before, and so the economic advantage of using this Toolkit should be considerable. FAQs • Efficiency – in how well such activities are agreed and progressed by providing a commonAssurance checklists reference framework for planners and developers, with a set of fair and reasonable checklists and examples to use.Guidance • Effectiveness – of any ICT that they include within their future activities by providing a focus onCase studies the aspects that are: – essential, such as the ‘lower-level’ telecommunications elements (civil engineering,Standards and links wireless and wireline) on which all the ‘higher-level’ telecommunications and IT systems dependGlossary – urgent, such as the earlier (concept and design) stages where key decisions are made and upon which the later (build and commission) stage depends – of significant importance, reducing the possibility of waste that might result from an inappropriate focus on those elements that are not essential, not urgent or simply inappropriateVersion 2.0 (21-02-06) 20 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  21. 21. ICT Toolkit Reasons to use it (Contd.) Back to main contents page Back Next Introduction By using the Toolkit, it is intended that there should be an ongoing increase in the potential of ICT to benefit: Background Purpose and scope – public sector organisations (planners and others) – such as those targets set in Reasons to use it regional and local economic planning and strategy documents and meeting overall How to use it objectives for sustainable developments FAQs – private sector organisations (developers and others) – such as supporting the commercial ambitions and potential for developmentsAssurance checklists – the public (residential and business users) – such as allowing improved access to aGuidance wider range of servicesCase studies The key focus of the Toolkit is, therefore, to allow:Standards and links – opportunities to be maximised – risks to be minimisedGlossary As with all things, the benefit of the Toolkit is in using it; those that use it well will benefit the most.Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 21 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  22. 22. ICT Toolkit How to use it Back to main contents page Back Next Introduction The Toolkit consists of this interactive PDF and four checklist documents for creating audit records for assurance exercises. The documents work together as shown in Exhibit 6 below. Background Purpose and scope There are three assurance checklists for developers, one for each of the key periods of the Reasons to use it development process (pre-application, planning and building control). Planners are provided with a single checklist that combines the pre-application and design stages. How to use it FAQs PLANNERS CHECKLIST DEVELOPERS CHECKLISTS KEY PERIODS FOR CHECKLIST USEAssurance checklists Stage 1: Pre-application Pre-application Examples Questions PlanningGuidance Stages 1 and 2: discussions Pre-application and Checklist Assurance DesignCase studies Examples Stage 2: DesignStandards and links Checklist Planning Examples Questions ApplicationGlossary Checklist Assurance Stage 3: Build and commission Building control Examples Questions Application Checklist Assurance Exhibit 6: The ICT Toolkit and its use by planners and developers in the development processVersion 2.0 (21-02-06) 22 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  23. 23. ICT Toolkit How to use it (Contd.) Back to main contents page Back Next Introduction As shown in Exhibit 6 above, there are three assurance checklists for developers, one for each of the key periods of the development process (pre-application, planning and building control). Background Planners are provided with a single checklist that combines the pre-application and design stages. Purpose and scope Reasons to use it The four checklists share the following structure in common: How to use it FAQs Checklists StructureAssurance checklists Examples Used as input. Each set of examples is intended for use towards the start of assurance toGuidance inform and focus the questions, and to provide a common reference for mutual understanding and assurance. A set of questions, supported by reasoning, areCase studies posed along with example guidance/evidence that might reasonably be expected to be available or made available.Standards and links Checklists for Used as output. assuranceGlossary Each checklist is intended for use towards the end of assurance to capture the answers to the questions and record the guidance/evidence, which by that time should be available. The checklist provides mutual understanding and assurance. The checklists do not form an integral part of this document but they are downloadable (as Word documents) from the Assurance Checklists section. The next two pages provide an overview of when in the development process each of the checklists should be used.Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 23 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  24. 24. ICT Toolkit How to use it (Contd.) Back to main contents page Back Next Introduction Checklists for Summary Background developers Purpose and scope Stage 1: This is the time within the development process when ideas begin to develop, Pre-application and for the developers to seek to assure themselves that there could be sufficient Reasons to use it profitability through land use. How to use it Therefore, the focus at this time is around concepts in terms of high-level FAQs questions about key aspects, setting boundaries and establishing arrangements that fundamentally influence the direction of ICT in a development.Assurance checklists An example deliverable for this stage would be an outline business case.Guidance Stage 2: Design This is the time within the development process when ideas are refined into plans, and for the developers to seek to assure themselves that there should beCase studies a sufficient profitability through land use. Therefore, the focus at this time is around design in terms of agreeing detailedStandards and links aspects, arrangements and plans for build and commission within the ICT concept previously established.Glossary An example deliverable for this stage would be a full business case. Stage 3: Build and This is the time within the development process when plans are executed within commission acceptable tolerance, and for the developers to seek to assure themselves that there can be a sufficient profitability through land use. Therefore, the focus at this time is around build and commission in terms of implementing the ICT design and establishing the arrangements as planned. An example deliverable for this stage would be a delivered business case.Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 24 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  25. 25. ICT Toolkit How to use it (Contd.) Back to main contents page Back Next Introduction Checklists for Summary Background developers Purpose and scope Stages 1 and 2: This checklist focuses on the key ICT aspects from the planners’ perspective Pre-application and throughout the pre-application and design stages of the development process, Reasons to use it Design prior to submitting a planning application. It does not focus on the project and risk How to use it management aspects, which are primarily the concern of the developer. FAQs Planners will seek to assure themselves that ICT aspects have been addressed by the developers prior to giving planning approval.Assurance checklistsGuidanceCase studiesStandards and linksGlossaryVersion 2.0 (21-02-06) 25 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  26. 26. ICT Toolkit How to use it (Contd.) Back to main contents page Back Next Introduction In addition to this introductory section and the assurance checklists, this interactive PDF contains the following sections: Background Purpose and scope Section Summary Reasons to use it Guidance This section describes the key elements required within ICT systems along with How to use it good practice, design principles and other useful information. The key benefits and FAQs developments of well-considered, designed and implemented ICT systems are also presented.Assurance checklists Case studies This section provides case studies that highlight the opportunities and risks associated with good and bad ICT development respectively. It also identifiesGuidance some of the public-sector initiatives that have, or plan to, incorporate ICT.Case studies Standards and links This section provides summary details of the key standards on which the guidance stands and sources from which further details and advice may be obtained.Standards and links Glossary The glossary contains a list of the most common technical terms and their respective definitions that appear within this document.GlossaryVersion 2.0 (21-02-06) 26 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  27. 27. ICT Toolkit FAQs Back to main contents page Back Next Introduction 1. Why do we need an ICT Toolkit? Background ICT is increasingly recognised as a key economic enabler and is pervasive in its application for Purpose and scope business and the community. The Toolkit is intended to assist and accelerate the emerging Reasons to use it utilitarian nature of ICT services and highlight opportunities to add value to new urban and rural developments. How to use it FAQs 2. What is in it for me?Assurance checklists The Toolkit offers free advice and guidance to use to commercial advantage, which should helpGuidance you create value from ICT in your planning and property projects.Case studies 3. What are the wider advantages of using it?Standards and links The regions and counties that use the ICT Toolkit will be recognised as sympathetic to the ICT needs of business and the community. Taking a commercial and mature approach toward theGlossary provisioning of ICT infrastructure will help to make locations more appealing to inward investors, better able to accommodate high-growth industry, in-tune with location and flexible work-based strategies, as well as being supportive of a ‘being connected’ culture and all the benefits that can bring to the community. It will also help address forthcoming energy directives that encourage an integrated system-based approach to energy management and building efficiency.Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 27 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  28. 28. ICT Toolkit FAQs (Contd.) Back to main contents page Back Next Introduction 4. Will it answer ‘all’ my questions? Background It will answer the questions that are of the most benefit and provide a platform from which to develop Purpose and scope further. Reasons to use it How to use it 5. Isn’t it just more government red tape and intrusion? FAQs It is well-intentioned encouragement that draws together existing practice in industry.Assurance checklists 6. Is use of the Toolkit mandatory?Guidance No. However, developments with ICT of the sort described in this document are already happeningCase studies and sooner or later competition will require you to address these matters anyway.Standards and links 7. Is the Toolkit biased toward specific suppliers, solutions and products?Glossary No. Advice and guidance in the Toolkit is independent of technology and supplier. 8. Can I be sure that the Toolkit’s advice and guidance is valid? The Toolkit has been developed by the Analysys Mason Group, which are ICT practitioners and leading independent consultants. Its development was completed in consultation with planners and developers across the region. At key points, the Toolkit includes links that both expand the information provided and endorse what is said through reference to the related industry lead body.Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 28 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  29. 29. ICT Toolkit FAQs (Contd.) Back to main contents page Back Next Introduction 9. In what formats are the Toolkit documents available and where can I find them? Background The Toolkit has been formatted into an interactive Adobe PDF format document, which can be read Purpose and scope using the freely available Adobe Acrobat Reader software. The checklists are available as Microsoft Reasons to use it Word documents. The Toolkit and the Checklists can be found on the emda Web site www.emda.org.uk. How to use it FAQsAssurance checklists 10. I have further questions about the Toolkit – who can I contact? For further information please send an email to ict.toolkit@emd.org.uk.GuidanceCase studies 11. How can I offer feedback on the Toolkit?Standards and links Feedback should be sent to ict.toolkit@emd.org.uk.GlossaryVersion 2.0 (21-02-06) 29 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  30. 30. ICT Toolkit Assurance checklists (30) Back to main contents page Print Back NextIntroduction There are separate assurance checklists for planners and developers and all of them are downloadable (as Word documents) by clicking on their respective boxes below.* Once downloaded, Assurance checklists you will need to save them into your local server, from where you will be able to use them as standard Word documents.Guidance Developers PlannersCase studies Stage 3: Stages 1 & 2:Standards and links Stage 1: Stage 2: Build and Pre-application Pre-application Design commission and DesignGlossary The assurance checklists share the following structure in common: Examples – each set of examples is intended for use towards the start of assurance to inform and focus the questions, and to provide a common reference for mutual understanding and assurance. A set of questions, supported by reasoning, are posed along with example guidance/evidence that might reasonably be expected to be available or made available. Checklists for assurance – each checklist is intended for use towards the end of assurance to capture the answers to the questions and record the guidance/evidence, which by that time should be available. The checklist provides mutual understanding and assurance. *The colours used reflect the colour scheme applied to the various checklists in the Word documents to make them easily recognisable.Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 30 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  31. 31. ICT Toolkit Guidance (31–84) Back to main contents page Print Back NextIntroduction This section describes the key elements required within ICT systems along with good practice, design principles and other useful information. The key benefits and developments of well-Assurance checklists considered, designed and implemented ICT systems are also presented. The structure of this section is as follows: Guidance • ICT systems: introduction Section* Pages • ICT systems: essential elements ICT systems: introduction 32–33 • ICT systems: desirable ICT systems: essential elements 34–63 elements • Maintaining and deepening ICT systems: desirable elements 64–82 knowledge Maintaining and deepening knowledge 83–84Case studiesStandards and linksGlossary *Click on the above sections (in blue) or on the menu items on the left to go to the relevant sections. Alternatively, you can use the Next and Back arrows to navigate through the pages one at a time. You can also click Back to main contents page at any time to return to the main contents page. The bookmark pane can also be used to navigate through the various sections.Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 31 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  32. 32. ICT Toolkit ICT systems: introduction Back to main contents page Back NextIntroduction Operational ICT systems are built using a number of elements, which, for the purposes of the Toolkit, have been divided as shown in Exhibit 7 below.Assurance checklists Ducting system Guidance Chambers Civil engineering • ICT systems: introduction Cabinets and street furniture (external plant) Telecommunications operator access • ICT systems: essential elements Equipment rooms • ICT systems: desirable Essential Civil engineering Horizontal containment elements elements (internal plant) Backbone containment systems • Maintaining and deepening knowledge Wireless systems Wireless and cablingCase studies Vertical and horizontal cabling (physical medium)Standards and links ‘Trends and futures’ of ICTGlossary Desirable The ICT value chain elements Arrangements for developers using agents Design and procurement principles Exhibit 7: Elements of an ICT system [Source: Analysys Mason Group]Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 32 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  33. 33. ICT Toolkit ICT systems: introduction (Contd.) Back to main contents page Back NextIntroduction The elements on an ICT system are illustrated in Exhibit 8 below.Assurance checklists Guidance Riser Office applications LAN • ICT systems: introduction 6th Floor Vertical Horizontal • ICT systems: essential subsystem subsystem elements 5th Floor WLAN • ICT systems: desirable Fire alarm Application WAN panel server Router elements Riser Wireless hub 2nd Floor closet Office • Maintaining and deepening Equipment block 1 room knowledge Wireless Radio Mast Office block 2 broadbandCase studies Telecommunications operator exchange Network switch Street House 2 cabinet House 1Standards and links WAN UndergroundGlossary Main duct Ducting System Residential broadband Terminal Fibre chamber services and telephony Sub duct Business voice and data services Co-axial cable Copper Exhibit 8: ICT system overview diagram [Source: Analysys Mason Group]Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 33 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  34. 34. ICT Toolkit ICT systems: essential elements Back to main contents page Back NextIntroduction The key elements of an ICT system are the physical or infrastructure components that provide the essential foundations for an ICT network in developments. They have the following characteristics:Assurance checklists Characteristics Examples Guidance • ICT systems: introduction Longevity Civil infrastructure typically has a lifespan of over 20 years. • ICT systems: essential Indoor cabling installations typically have a 15-20 years’ manufacturer’s elements warranty. • ICT systems: desirable elements Low operating costs Limited maintenance and repair requirements. • Maintaining and deepening Least difficult for Skills required are similar to the core competencies in construction. knowledge developers to embraceCase studies High cost to retrofit Installing civil infrastructure post completion could be up to ten times more costly than during the build.Standards and links Commercial viability Least risk aspects of ICT for a developer.GlossaryVersion 2.0 (21-02-06) 34 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  35. 35. ICT Toolkit ICT systems: essential elements (Contd.) Back to main contents page Back NextIntroduction As shown in Exhibit 7 on page 32, the essential elements of an ICT system are:Assurance checklists – ducting system (36–37) – chambers (38–39) Guidance • ICT systems: introduction – cabinets and street furniture (40–41) • ICT systems: essential – telecommunications operator access (42) elements • ICT systems: desirable – equipment rooms (43–49) elements • Maintaining and deepening – horizontal containment (50–51) knowledge – backbone containment systems (52–53)Case studies – wireless systems (54–56)Standards and links – vertical and horizontal cabling (57–60)Glossary *Click on the above sections (in blue) to go to the relevant sub-sections. Alternatively, you can use the Next and Back arrows to navigate through the pages one at a time. You can also click Back to essential elements list to return to this contents page. The bookmark pane can also be used to navigate through the various sections.Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 35 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  36. 36. ICT Toolkit ICT systems: essential elements – ducting system Back to main contents page Back NextIntroduction Ducting systemAssurance checklists Requirement A ducting system is required around developments to link buildings and locations of other ICT system elements and possibly to allow access by telecommunications Guidance operators. • ICT systems: introduction Definition Ducts are pipes that aid cable installation, which provide a protected and secure underground route to premises. • ICT systems: essential elements Good practice and Cables may be installed in ducts by a variety of methods: ‘blown’ through using • ICT systems: desirable useful information compressed air; winched; pulled by hand, etc. (Duct sizes vary but are typically elements about 100mm of diameter.) • Maintaining and deepening External ducts are often made of UPVC or Polyethylene to ensure longevity and low knowledge cost, but may emit harmful gasses (particularly UPVC) if subjected to fire, hence they should not enter any buildings.Case studies Lubricant is often used to assist the cable installation and to minimise friction; excess lubricant should be avoided.Standards and links Ducts should be laid as late in the construction phase as practical to prevent damage from subsequent construction.Glossary ‘Nests’ of ducts should be installed where there is sufficient requirement, as the incremental cost is low compared with the cost of installing a single duct, and the potential future benefits are high such as ease of expansion and choice of operator.Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 36 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  37. 37. ICT Toolkit ICT systems: essential elements – ducting system (Contd.) Back to main contents page Back to essential elements list Back NextIntroduction Ducting system (Contd.)Assurance checklists Design principles Multiple ducts should be provided or ducts should be large enough to be sub-ducted with three, or possibly four, sub-ducts to minimise disruption to existing cables when Guidance installing new cables. Sub-ducts can also be useful where cables are installed or owned by multiple parties as they give some degree of physical separation and a • ICT systems: introduction contractual boundary. • ICT systems: essential ‘Pull or turn chambers’ may be needed at intervals to assist the installation. elements ‘Terminal chambers’ are usually placed outside buildings to allow the external ducts • ICT systems: desirable to join up to the internal ducts for the building. elements Diverse routing of ducts is recommended, where the scale of the installation allows, • Maintaining and deepening facilitating resilience in the overall cable system. knowledge The positioning and colour of ducts should comply with the National Joint Utilities Group (NJUG) recommendations.4Case studies Duct systems should include suitable drainage to ensure that they can empty if flooded; telecommunications cables will withstand some water immersion butStandards and links should not be subjected to water for continuous periods.Glossary All ducts should contain a draw rope to assist future cable installation and should be sealed after installation to prevent the ingress of rodents or silt. 4NJUG guidelines on the positioning and colour coding of utilities apparatus www.njug.org.Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 37 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  38. 38. ICT Toolkit ICT systems: essential elements – chambers Back to main contents page Back to essential elements list Back NextIntroduction ChambersAssurance checklists Requirement Chambers are required for access and inspection across a development site at periodic intervals on the ducting system. Guidance Definition Chambers are underground enclosures that allow access to ducts for the installation • ICT systems: introduction of cables and/or provide a suitable location for the fixing of cable joints. • ICT systems: essential elements Good practice and Chambers are usually classed as ‘confined areas’, and appropriate safety useful information precautions should be taken, e.g. gas testing prior to entry. • ICT systems: desirable elements Joint chambers are similar (often identical) to pulling chambers and are used to house in-line joints. • Maintaining and deepening knowledge Good cable management is required in chambers to prevent damage. Care should be taken not to over-tighten cable ties, as the performance andCase studies reliability of the cable can be affected. Joints should be raised off the bottom of the enclosure and out of the way of anyStandards and links duct entry point, and are often mounted on the side of the chamber. Covers fitted to a chamber must be suitable for the above-ground environment, e.g.Glossary withstand road vehicles or pedestrians, etc. Lockable covers should be provided where services may be prone to tampering. Entry points to the building from terminal chambers should be sealed to maintain fire protection, the entry of any gasses, water ingress and entry by rodents, etc.Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 38 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  39. 39. ICT Toolkit ICT systems: essential elements – chambers (Contd.) Back to main contents page Back to essential elements list Back NextIntroduction Chambers (Contd.)Assurance checklists Good practice and External grade UPVC ducts and accessories are not suitable for internal use due to useful information the potential for emission of toxic gasses during fires. Guidance Fittings should be provided to assist access and for securing cables and joints; any • ICT systems: introduction metal fittings should be galvanised to prevent corrosion. • ICT systems: essential Design principles Terminal chambers are usually placed outside buildings to allow the external ducts elements to join up to the internal ducts for the building. • ICT systems: desirable Ducts should enter and exit chambers from opposite ends where possible to elements minimise cable bends and to maximise installation capability. • Maintaining and deepening Chambers may be needed at intervals along duct systems to assist with cable knowledge installation: – blown installation, straight run (every 2km maximum)Case studies – winched installation, straight run (every 500m maximum)Standards and links – hand-pulled (every 250m maximum) – where there are tight bends or changes of directionGlossary Chambers need to be sufficiently large to allow cables to be installed without bending below the cable’s specified minimum-bending radius and to allow suitable access if utilising a winch. Sufficient space should be allocated for re-termination loops (short coils of cable that allow re-termination without having to re-install the cable) to be stored in the chamber without bending below the specified minimum-bending radius.Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 39 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  40. 40. ICT systems: essential elements –ICT Toolkit cabinets and street furniture Back to main contents page Back to essential elements list Back NextIntroduction Cabinets and street furnitureAssurance checklists Requirement Cabinets, or perhaps other street furniture, may be required to house ICT equipment at regular intervals throughout a development. Guidance Definition A cabinet is an enclosure designed for ICT equipment that may house connection • ICT systems: introduction devices, terminated cables, splices, apparatus and wiring; street furniture includes • ICT systems: essential non-ICT fixtures such as lamp posts, signs, kiosks etc., which may be used to house and disguise ICT equipment. elements • ICT systems: desirable Good practice and There are many styles of cabinet and street furniture for external use, dependent on useful information the type of use and size required. elements • Maintaining and deepening Cabinets typically need security and/or protection from prevailing conditions such as weather, vandalism or accidental damage. knowledge Security is paramount, cabinets should be fitted with a suitable lock or require aCase studies special tool for access. Cabinets should be rated for appropriate levels of ingress protection, in accordanceStandards and links with IEC International Standard 60529, e.g. IP55 or IP65. Design principle Size and use considerations should include an allowance for future expansion.Glossary An appropriate style and considerate location should be selected in keeping with the surrounding environment (visual impact). Access for maintenance or upgrades is required.Version 2.0 (21-02-06) 40 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
  41. 41. ICT systems: essential elements –ICT Toolkit cabinets and street furniture (Contd.) Back to main contents page Back to essential elements list Back NextIntroduction Cabinets and street furniture (Contd.)Assurance checklists Design principles Cable ingress and egress – ducts usually terminate in a nearby chamber with cables running into the cabinet via short lengths of duct/conduit. Guidance Electrical power requirements need to be considered if active equipment is to be • ICT systems: introduction installed. • ICT systems: essential Cabinets should be provided with ventilation to prevent corrosion or to provide a elements suitable environment for active equipment. • ICT systems: desirable elements • Maintaining and deepening knowledgeCase studiesStandards and linksGlossaryVersion 2.0 (21-02-06) 41 © Copyright 2006 – East Midlands Development Agency (emda)
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