The Education of Immigrant Students

559 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
559
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

The Education of Immigrant Students

  1. 1. Chapter 11 Marie McAndrew THE EDUCATION OF IMMIGRANT STUDENTS IN A GLOBALIZED WORLD: POLICY DEBATES IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE
  2. 2. <ul><li>Immigrant students have not always received the same education as native or majority students due to the inconsistent views of immigration. </li></ul><ul><li>Parents of immigrant students often established their own schools to ensure retention of their language, culture, and religion (McAndrews, 2007). </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>Ethnospecific institutions were created due to the emerging ideas that public schools were not preparing minority students properly. </li></ul><ul><li>Common schools provide students with the knowledge and skills needed to succeed and social interactions for growth, but are not specifically geared toward one culture or minority. </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>According to McAndrew’s essay, </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Common schools were seen as playing a double role in the integration of newcomers; one on hand, they propagated an explicit curriculum, which consisted of shared values and minimal knowledge needed to be a productive member of society; on the other, they were vehicles for intergroup contact and friendships among children at an early age when identities and attitudes are developed” (Suarez- Orozco 2007, p. 234). </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Immigrant students have faced many challenges in public education systems including; language barriers, culture differences, stereotyping, and at one time, segregation </li></ul><ul><li>In the past, active segregation of minority students was a common practice, but immigrant parents often established their own schools to ensure their language, culture, and religion was not lost </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>In today’s globalized world, we are striving for cultural integration and equal education for all students. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Globalization—which has weakened the nation-state, heightened the importance of individual choice, and encouraged a tendency to look at education as a global market commodity—has certainly played a role in school segregation. </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Globalization also holds benefits for today’s students; allowing access to an international network and greater recognition of immigrant languages. </li></ul><ul><li>Language diversity in school systems can benefit all students and influence positive social communication. </li></ul><ul><li>This segregation between immigrant and native students is lessened when school systems recognize the diversity. </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Accommodation of diversity is needed in schools in order to benefit all students involved. </li></ul><ul><li>The incorporation of immigrant cultures, through practices that meet the needs of all students, is a positive way to teach a diverse student population. </li></ul>

×