The Implementation of the NSSGA Mineral
Identification and Management Guide for the
Aggregate Industry
2RJ Lee Group
3RJ Lee Group
 Background
 Getting identification correct
 Why is it important to get it correct?
 Where does it apply...
Background
• Not an industry standard.
• One tool in a toolbox of ways to address the issue
• Meant to be modified by indi...
5RJ Lee Group
Getting Identification Correct
Importance of getting it correct
• The non asbestos variety of these minerals occur throughout the
United States in aggreg...
Aggregate Uses
• Concrete
– Bridge beams, buildings,
homes, roads, runways,
etc..
• Asphalt and Roadstone
– Roads, runways...
8RJ Lee Group
Where does it apply?
9RJ Lee Group
With Asbestos Occurrences
10RJ Lee Group
Preventative Steps…
Preventative Steps
• Periodic on-site inspections by a qualified geologist
11RJ Lee Group
 Walking visual inspection of
q...
12RJ Lee Group
• Settled dust collection and analysis
Preventative Steps
 Collection of settled dust in
different areas w...
13RJ Lee Group
If asbestos minerals fibers are found…
Qualitative Geologic Survey
14RJ Lee Group
Mineralogical Site Assessment
15RJ Lee Group
• Literature and digital data research
• Locate source of asbestos by detaile...
16RJ Lee Group
Essential components of an actual
mineral assessment report….
17Mineralogical Assessment – ABC QuarryRJ Lee Group
Overview of Pertinent Regional Geologic Features
Diabase Dikes
ABC Fau...
18Mineralogical Assessment – ABC QuarryRJ Lee Group
Picture Of Diabase Dike On South Wall As Taken From This LocationPictu...
19RJ Lee Group
• Settled dust collection program initiation
Settled Dust
 Regular collection of settled dust
for analysis...
20Mineralogical Assessment – ABC QuarryRJ Lee Group
DRILL CORE LOG: CH 4-2010 Camak, Georgia 1/20/10
Location: N 33 28’ 44...
21Mineralogical Assessment – ABC QuarryRJ Lee Group
Known and estimated
Diabase Dike Locations
in current pit and north,
n...
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The implementation of the NSSGA mineral identification

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A proper way to address the presence of asbestos in your mining operation.

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The implementation of the NSSGA mineral identification

  1. 1. The Implementation of the NSSGA Mineral Identification and Management Guide for the Aggregate Industry
  2. 2. 2RJ Lee Group
  3. 3. 3RJ Lee Group  Background  Getting identification correct  Why is it important to get it correct?  Where does it apply?  Preventative Steps  Qualitative Geologic Survey Contents
  4. 4. Background • Not an industry standard. • One tool in a toolbox of ways to address the issue • Meant to be modified by individuals to best fit current needs • Developed to assess whether asbestos is present at an aggregate mining site or other fibers of asbestiform habit. • Does not address other mining safety concerns. • Amphibole group minerals’ asbestiform varieties regulated by the US EPA, OSHA, MSHA include: – Chrysotile, Actinolite Asbestos, Crocidolite (Riebekite Asbestos), Amosite (Cummingtonite-Grunerite Asbestos), Anthophyllite Asbestos, Tremolite Asbestos. 4RJ Lee Group
  5. 5. 5RJ Lee Group Getting Identification Correct
  6. 6. Importance of getting it correct • The non asbestos variety of these minerals occur throughout the United States in aggregate operations. • Aggregate material is used in a wide variety of applications and products. • To refute poor geologic work and reports of false positives at your quarry or S&G pit. • To uncover an undocumented occurrence which leads to worker exposure and potential future litigation. 6RJ Lee Group
  7. 7. Aggregate Uses • Concrete – Bridge beams, buildings, homes, roads, runways, etc.. • Asphalt and Roadstone – Roads, runways, School playgrounds, parking lots, footpaths, cycleways, constructional fill, armor stone, gabion stone, etc… • Railroad Ballast • Mortar • Agricultural uses • Other – Flue-gas de-sulphurisation in coal fired power plants, whitening agent or filler in paper, adhesives, roof shingles, paint, plastics, PVC, toothpaste, medical tablets, make-up, cleaning products, etc… 7RJ Lee Group
  8. 8. 8RJ Lee Group Where does it apply?
  9. 9. 9RJ Lee Group With Asbestos Occurrences
  10. 10. 10RJ Lee Group Preventative Steps…
  11. 11. Preventative Steps • Periodic on-site inspections by a qualified geologist 11RJ Lee Group  Walking visual inspection of quarry or S&G pit to uncover suspect areas where asbestos might be found.  Closer examination of such areas with carefully documented collection of rock samples to be analyzed by a qualified laboratory for the presence or absence of asbestos.  Understanding of geologic environment from literature
  12. 12. 12RJ Lee Group • Settled dust collection and analysis Preventative Steps  Collection of settled dust in different areas within the plant.  Collection of hand samples of rock with suspect mineralogy throughout the quarry or pit.
  13. 13. 13RJ Lee Group If asbestos minerals fibers are found…
  14. 14. Qualitative Geologic Survey 14RJ Lee Group
  15. 15. Mineralogical Site Assessment 15RJ Lee Group • Literature and digital data research • Locate source of asbestos by detailed field assessment and develop a geologic model to show its distribution • Commencement of a settled dust monitoring program • Further targeted collection of rock samples and core (if available) for analysis • Recommendations
  16. 16. 16RJ Lee Group Essential components of an actual mineral assessment report….
  17. 17. 17Mineralogical Assessment – ABC QuarryRJ Lee Group Overview of Pertinent Regional Geologic Features Diabase Dikes ABC Fault Degrees of Metamorphism (Isograds) Folded Beds On State Geologic Map Base 1:500,000
  18. 18. 18Mineralogical Assessment – ABC QuarryRJ Lee Group Picture Of Diabase Dike On South Wall As Taken From This LocationPicture Of Diabase Dike On North Wall As Taken From This Location Samples of Diabase Dike taken from this location Site 1 Site 2 Pictures and Sample Collection
  19. 19. 19RJ Lee Group • Settled dust collection program initiation Settled Dust  Regular collection of settled dust for analysis in areas throughout the plant. This will usually include sampling points at the primary and secondary crushers as a starting point. Mineralogical Assessment – ABC Quarry
  20. 20. 20Mineralogical Assessment – ABC QuarryRJ Lee Group DRILL CORE LOG: CH 4-2010 Camak, Georgia 1/20/10 Location: N 33 28’ 44.6” W 82 38’ 41.3” Interval (in feet) Description______________________ 0.0 – 10.0 Overburden; no recovery 10.0 - 22.0 Weathered porphyroblastic biotite gneiss; 50% recovery. 22.0 – 35.1 Porphyroblastic biotite gneiss; very weak foliation with shallow dip; porphyroblasts to 1 cm with local elongation to 3.0 cm; most are white but a few contain pink cores and the largest appear flattened and irregular microcline patches with irregular white feldspar rims. There are no coherent biotite zones and foliation is imparted only by preferential flattening of porphyroblasts. Weathered 26.5 - 27.5, 30.8 – 32.3 35.1 - 36.0 Microcline pegmatite. 36.0 - 146.8 Fresh porphyroblastic biotite gneiss as above. Microcline becoming less obvious at about 100 feet but where present, is in larger irregular masses. “Mafic” band 1 cm thick at 110.8; 2 cm quartz vein dipping 25 degrees at 129.6. 146.8 – 148.1 Mafic unit; fine-grained and uniform; hard; unfoliated. Contact with gneiss does not appear intrusive; contacts are near horizontal. Core at upper contact retained after box photographed. 148.1 – 152.0 Porphyroblastic biotite gneiss as before. 152.0 - 155.2 Microcline pegmatite. 155.2 – 159.5 Porphyroblastic biotite gneiss as before. 159.5 - 160.3 Microcline pegmatite. 160.3 – 202.0 Porphyroblastic biotite gneiss as before. 202.0 T.D. DRILL CORE LOG: CH 4-2010 Camak, Georgia 1/20/10 Location: N 33 28’ 44.6” W 82 38’ 41.3” Interval (in feet) Description______________________ 0.0 – 10.0 Overburden; no recovery 10.0 - 22.0 Weathered porphyroblastic biotite gneiss; 50% recovery. 22.0 – 35.1 Porphyroblastic biotite gneiss; very weak foliation with shallow dip; porphyroblasts to 1 cm with local elongation to 3.0 cm; most are white but a few contain pink cores and the largest appear flattened and irregular microcline patches with irregular white feldspar rims. There are no coherent biotite zones and foliation is imparted only by preferential flattening of porphyroblasts. Weathered 26.5 - 27.5, 30.8 – 32.3 35.1 - 36.0 Microcline pegmatite. 36.0 - 146.8 Fresh porphyroblastic biotite gneiss as above. Microcline becoming less obvious at about 100 feet but where present, is in larger irregular masses. “Mafic” band 1 cm thick at 110.8; 2 cm quartz vein dipping 25 degrees at 129.6. 146.8 – 148.1 Mafic unit; fine-grained and uniform; hard; unfoliated. Contact with gneiss does not appear intrusive; contacts are near horizontal. Core at upper contact retained after box photographed. 148.1 – 152.0 Porphyroblastic biotite gneiss as before. 152.0 - 155.2 Microcline pegmatite. 155.2 – 159.5 Porphyroblastic biotite gneiss as before. 159.5 - 160.3 Microcline pegmatite. 160.3 – 202.0 Porphyroblastic biotite gneiss as before. 202.0 T.D. Although logged as ‘mafic’ at ~110’ depth, no such zone is seen. Analysis of Current Data
  21. 21. 21Mineralogical Assessment – ABC QuarryRJ Lee Group Known and estimated Diabase Dike Locations in current pit and north, north-east of current pit. There is a high probability that additional diabase dikes occur within the mining boundaries of the ultimate pit. Vertical drill holes are unlikely to contact any dike because of the near vertical dip. Some additional angled drilling would be recommended to test for the presence of diabase within the next 5 year mine plan footprint. Possible extension of previously mapped diabase dike Known Diabase Dike Interpretation of Data

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