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Shakespeare intro 2013
Shakespeare intro 2013
Shakespeare intro 2013
Shakespeare intro 2013
Shakespeare intro 2013
Shakespeare intro 2013
Shakespeare intro 2013
Shakespeare intro 2013
Shakespeare intro 2013
Shakespeare intro 2013
Shakespeare intro 2013
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Shakespeare intro 2013

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This is a basic introduction to sonnets and the play Much Ado about Nothing.

This is a basic introduction to sonnets and the play Much Ado about Nothing.

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  • 1. INTRODUCTION TO SHAKESPEARE  We will study the following: Sonnets Basic terms to remember Much ado about nothing by Linda Rubens
  • 2. Born April 23, 1564 - Died April 23, 1616
  • 3. Learning intentions  In Shakespeare’s Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer’s Day, the writer has perfected a comparison of something he loves to another beautiful or enticing object. For this assignment, students should understand the workings of sonnets, and also draw a similar comparison with something they love . After reviewing and analysing the original poem, students will compose their own personal sonnet to imitate, yet not copy, Shakespeare’s idea of bliss.
  • 4. Flipped classwork  Your prep before the next lesson is to read through the sonnets and look for any characteristics that are similar Eg: Look at sentence length number of sentences rhyme scheme… Gathering
  • 5. Shall I compare thee to a summers day Sonnet 18 ( Petrarchan)  Shall I compare thee to a summers day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate. Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summers lease hath all too short a date. Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimmed; And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance, or natures changing course untrimmed. But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou owst; Nor shall death brag thou wandrest in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou growst, So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.
  • 6. My mistress eyes are nothing like the sun (Sonnet 130) (Shakespearean) My mistress eyes are nothing like the sun;Coral is far more red than her lips red;If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.I have seen roses damasked, red and white,But no such roses see I in her cheeks;And in some perfumes is there more delightThan in the breath that from my mistress reeks.I love to hear her speak, yet well I knowThat music hath a far more pleasing sound;I grant I never saw a goddess go;My mistress when she walks treads on the ground.And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rareAs any she belied with false compare.
  • 7. Terms to remember: Iambic pentameter: Unstressed/ stressed (U_)Alternate rhyme scheme: abab cdcd efef ggOctet and sestetQuatrainRhyming coupletPetrarchan sonnets ProcessingShakespearean sonnets
  • 8. Success criteria  Students should choose to EITHER write a serious sonnet, comparing their love to something concrete and tangible…as with Summer’s day. OR Write a sonnet as a parody, concluding with a serious rhyming couplet. Applying
  • 9. Structure of Shakespeare’s plays  Act I: Introduction Act II: Rising action Act III: Climax Act IV: Falling action Act V: Denouement
  • 10. Much Ado About Nothing is a comedy  Benedick and Beatrice are engaged in a "merry war"; they both talk a mile a minute and proclaim their scorn for love, marriage and each other. In contrast, Claudio and Hero are sweet young people who are rendered practically speechless by their love for one another. “Nothing“ is a pun on "noting,“ which is gossip, rumour and eavesdropping. Dogberry, a Constable is a master of malapropisms The villain is the bastard Don John. Don Pedro is the prince.
  • 11. Now…  View the film version of Much Ado about Nothing. THEN: It’s time to start reading Act I where we are introduced to all the main characters.

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