Native Plants for Oregon’s Willamette Valley<br />Linda R McMahan, Ph.D.<br />Botanist and Community Horticulturist<br />O...
Why native plants? <br />The most reliable species<br />Different plants for different purposes<br />Which species attract...
Why Native Plants<br />Native Plants are:  <br />Already adapted to our weather and soils<br />Reminders of our natural su...
Trees in the Landscape<br /><ul><li> Structure
 Shade
 Protection
 Vertical Interest</li></ul>Grand fir, Abiesgrandis and western red cedar, Thujaplicata<br />
Oregon ash – Fraxinuslatifolia<br />
Oregon ash<br />Tree to 80 ft <br />Tolerates moist / seasonally wet soils<br />Wildlife value:<br />Food<br />Cover<br />...
Oregon oak<br />Quercusgarryana<br />
Oregon oak<br />Tall, deciduous, slow-growing <br />Fallen leaves can suppress weeds & work well in compost<br />Cannot to...
Bigleaf maple<br />Acer macrophyllum<br />
Big Leaf MapleAcer macrophyllum<br />Stately tree<br />Use large leaves for weed suppression or compost<br />Once establis...
Ponderosa pine – Pinus ponderosa<br />
Ponderosa pine<br />Tall, but usually ok near structures<br />Full sun<br />Dry sites east of Cascades<br />West of Cascad...
Western red cedar – Thuja plicata<br />
Western red cedar<br />Grows near but not in water<br />Sun, part sun<br />Mature tree can be very tall<br />
Vine maple – Acer circinnatum<br />
Vine maple<br />Graceful understory tree, prefers part shade<br />Slow growing<br />Readily available<br />
Osoberry(Indian plum) – Oemleriacerasiformis<br />
Osoberry<br />Light shade<br /><ul><li>Drier areas
March blooms
“Plums” bird food
Easy to grow
Available at nurseries</li></li></ul><li>Shrubs in the Landscape<br /><ul><li> Shelter
 Erosion Control
 Wildlife Value
 Eye Level Interest</li></ul>Red flowering currant, Ribessanguineum<br />
Mock Orange<br />Philadephuslewesii<br />
Mock orange<br />o  Fragrant, <br />    good nectar <br />    source<br />o  Fast grower,<br />    drought <br />    toler...
Nootka Rose – Rosa nutkana<br />
Nootka rose<br />Full sun in drier areas<br />Bank stabilizer, spreads underground<br />Flowers provide nectar, hips food ...
Oregon grape – Berberis aquifolium<br />
Oregon grape<br />Evergreen, forms colonies<br />Berries and nectar support wildlife<br />State flower of Oregon<br />Wide...
Blue elderberry – Sambucusmexicana<br />
Blue elderberry<br />Tall, multi-stalked<br />Sun, part sun<br />Average to dry site<br />White, flat-topped flower cluste...
Red flowering currant – Ribes sanguineum<br />
Red flowering currant<br />Blooms Feb/Mar<br />Shade/part-sun, banks and drier areas<br />Fast growing,  readily available...
Red osier dogwood – Cornus sericea<br />
Red osier dogwood<br />Occurs naturally along streams but tolerates drier conditions<br />Full to part sun<br />Red winter...
Snowberry - Symphoricarpusalbus<br />
Snowberry<br />Spreads to stabilize banks<br />Spreads to increase cover<br />Bluish, soft foliage<br />Fruits provide foo...
Groundcovers and Herbaceous Plants in the Landscape<br />Garden interest<br />Protection for compaction by rain<br />Hidin...
Sword fern – Polystichummunitum<br />
Sword fern<br />Part or full shade<br />One of the best plants for bank stabilization<br />Great landscape ornamental<br /...
Wild strawberries – Fragaria—3 native species<br />Ground cover, spreading by runners<br />Some species prefer shade; othe...
Lady fern – Athyriumfelix-femina<br />Unfurling spring fronds<br />
Lady Fern<br />Prefers sun or part sun, good soil moisture<br />Good for bank stabilization<br />Winter deciduous<br />Del...
Wood sorrel – Oxalis oregana<br />
Wood sorrel<br />Aggressive groundcover<br />Full to part shade<br />Once established, difficult to remove<br />Will toler...
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Native Plants For Oregon’S Willamette Valley

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A show to introduce members of the public to selected native plants of Oregon's Willamette Valley that are good species for landscapes, gardens, and restoration projects.

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Transcript of "Native Plants For Oregon’S Willamette Valley"

  1. 1. Native Plants for Oregon’s Willamette Valley<br />Linda R McMahan, Ph.D.<br />Botanist and Community Horticulturist<br />Oregon State University Extension Service<br />linda.mcmahan@oregonstate.edu<br />
  2. 2. Why native plants? <br />The most reliable species<br />Different plants for different purposes<br />Which species attract the wildlife you want to encourage and enjoy<br />What You Might Like to Know <br />Native camas, Camassia sp.<br />
  3. 3. Why Native Plants<br />Native Plants are: <br />Already adapted to our weather and soils<br />Reminders of our natural surroundings<br />Support for local insects, birds and other wildlife<br />Beneficial for stream health<br />Hardy and relatively disease free<br />Beautiful<br />Western mock orange, Philadelphuslewesii<br />
  4. 4. Trees in the Landscape<br /><ul><li> Structure
  5. 5. Shade
  6. 6. Protection
  7. 7. Vertical Interest</li></ul>Grand fir, Abiesgrandis and western red cedar, Thujaplicata<br />
  8. 8. Oregon ash – Fraxinuslatifolia<br />
  9. 9. Oregon ash<br />Tree to 80 ft <br />Tolerates moist / seasonally wet soils<br />Wildlife value:<br />Food<br />Cover<br />Nesting sites <br />
  10. 10. Oregon oak<br />Quercusgarryana<br />
  11. 11. Oregon oak<br />Tall, deciduous, slow-growing <br />Fallen leaves can suppress weeds & work well in compost<br />Cannot tolerate summer irrigation<br />
  12. 12. Bigleaf maple<br />Acer macrophyllum<br />
  13. 13. Big Leaf MapleAcer macrophyllum<br />Stately tree<br />Use large leaves for weed suppression or compost<br />Once established requires no added water, but can support a shady lawn<br />
  14. 14. Ponderosa pine – Pinus ponderosa<br />
  15. 15. Ponderosa pine<br />Tall, but usually ok near structures<br />Full sun<br />Dry sites east of Cascades<br />West of Cascades, the Willamette Valley form withstands wetter sites<br />
  16. 16. Western red cedar – Thuja plicata<br />
  17. 17. Western red cedar<br />Grows near but not in water<br />Sun, part sun<br />Mature tree can be very tall<br />
  18. 18. Vine maple – Acer circinnatum<br />
  19. 19. Vine maple<br />Graceful understory tree, prefers part shade<br />Slow growing<br />Readily available<br />
  20. 20. Osoberry(Indian plum) – Oemleriacerasiformis<br />
  21. 21. Osoberry<br />Light shade<br /><ul><li>Drier areas
  22. 22. March blooms
  23. 23. “Plums” bird food
  24. 24. Easy to grow
  25. 25. Available at nurseries</li></li></ul><li>Shrubs in the Landscape<br /><ul><li> Shelter
  26. 26. Erosion Control
  27. 27. Wildlife Value
  28. 28. Eye Level Interest</li></ul>Red flowering currant, Ribessanguineum<br />
  29. 29. Mock Orange<br />Philadephuslewesii<br />
  30. 30. Mock orange<br />o Fragrant, <br /> good nectar <br /> source<br />o Fast grower,<br /> drought <br /> tolerant<br />o Sun, part <br /> shade<br />o Butterfly host<br />
  31. 31. Nootka Rose – Rosa nutkana<br />
  32. 32. Nootka rose<br />Full sun in drier areas<br />Bank stabilizer, spreads underground<br />Flowers provide nectar, hips food for wildlife<br />
  33. 33. Oregon grape – Berberis aquifolium<br />
  34. 34. Oregon grape<br />Evergreen, forms colonies<br />Berries and nectar support wildlife<br />State flower of Oregon<br />Widely available<br />
  35. 35. Blue elderberry – Sambucusmexicana<br />
  36. 36. Blue elderberry<br />Tall, multi-stalked<br />Sun, part sun<br />Average to dry site<br />White, flat-topped flower clusters<br />Blue berries feed wildlife<br />
  37. 37. Red flowering currant – Ribes sanguineum<br />
  38. 38. Red flowering currant<br />Blooms Feb/Mar<br />Shade/part-sun, banks and drier areas<br />Fast growing, readily available<br />Drupes in late summer for birds <br />Hummingbird pollinated<br />
  39. 39. Red osier dogwood – Cornus sericea<br />
  40. 40. Red osier dogwood<br />Occurs naturally along streams but tolerates drier conditions<br />Full to part sun<br />Red winter twigs<br />Host for native butterflies<br />Look for local plants<br />
  41. 41. Snowberry - Symphoricarpusalbus<br />
  42. 42. Snowberry<br />Spreads to stabilize banks<br />Spreads to increase cover<br />Bluish, soft foliage<br />Fruits provide food through the winter<br />
  43. 43. Groundcovers and Herbaceous Plants in the Landscape<br />Garden interest<br />Protection for compaction by rain<br />Hiding places for small creatures<br />Helps prevent erosion<br />Ladyfern and oxalis<br />
  44. 44. Sword fern – Polystichummunitum<br />
  45. 45. Sword fern<br />Part or full shade<br />One of the best plants for bank stabilization<br />Great landscape ornamental<br />Easy to find<br />Easy to transplant and relocate<br />
  46. 46. Wild strawberries – Fragaria—3 native species<br />Ground cover, spreading by runners<br />Some species prefer shade; others sun<br />Nectar for butterflies and other insects<br />Butterfly caterpillar hosts<br />
  47. 47. Lady fern – Athyriumfelix-femina<br />Unfurling spring fronds<br />
  48. 48. Lady Fern<br />Prefers sun or part sun, good soil moisture<br />Good for bank stabilization<br />Winter deciduous<br />Delicate soft foliage<br />2-4 feet tall<br />
  49. 49. Wood sorrel – Oxalis oregana<br />
  50. 50. Wood sorrel<br />Aggressive groundcover<br />Full to part shade<br />Once established, difficult to remove<br />Will tolerate dry shade and go dormant in dry summers<br />
  51. 51. Camas - Camassia species<br />
  52. 52. Camas<br />Commercially available bulb<br />Spring blooming<br />Needs spring moisture<br />Needs summer dry<br />
  53. 53. Oregon iris – Iris tenax<br />
  54. 54. Oregon iris<br />Reliable native iris, late spring blooms<br />Tolerates drier sites<br />
  55. 55. Yellow monkey flower – Mimulus guttatus<br />
  56. 56. Yellow monkey flower<br />Moist soil<br />Sun/part-shade<br />Spreads to become a ground cover<br />Nectar <br />Seeds provide food for wildlife<br />
  57. 57. In Summary<br />Natives add or enhance wildlife habitat<br />Look at all levels-trees shrubs, herbaceous plants and groundcovers<br />Match the requirements of the plant to its new habitat<br />Plant directly into native soil<br />Wild bleeding heart, Dicentraformosa<br />
  58. 58. In Summary<br />Take care of plants for the first 2-5 years after planting—some will require additional irrigation during this time<br />Group plants with similar needs together<br />Enjoy your new connection with Oregon native plants <br />Wild bleeding heart, Dicentraformosa<br />
  59. 59. Thank You<br />Photos by the author<br />Presentation may be used freely for educational purposes<br />For all other purposes, contact the author at linda.mcmahan@oregonstate.edu<br />Stream violet, Viola glabella<br />
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